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ranges with infrared grills

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
we're looking to redo our kitchen and replace our current range (a bosch gas model, which has has reliability issues). one of the things i would like is an infrared grill, which would give me the ability to grill year 'round.

so far, i've looked at viking, bluestar and wolf, but i've heard conflicting things regarding reliability. i was even considering a french range from lacanche or la cornue (but the price is definitely an obstacle) or a bertazzoni.

ideally, we'd like to stay under $6k.

so, is there a "perfect" combination of reliability, high BTUs and infrared grilling capability?

/btw, i have searched on this subject, and i know there are a lot of threads on viking vs. wolf, but i didn't see anything about grills.
post #2 of 11

Not in what I've found. I'd skip it and use a cast iron grill on the burner. And get a very good extraction hood that vents to the outside.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 11

Hi there, I just bought a wolf srt364c, 36", 4 sealed-burner, with infrared charbroiler grill. It's currently being held at our retailers warehouse till our remodel is ready. I've read on another thread here, and many other places, mixed reviews about the charbroilers but I know it's what I want.

 

My concern is the ventilation. Searing can create a good amount of smoke and vapour.  I want to know if there's more advice re the range hood.

We are looking at several others right now, inserts, and are trying to shave some cost off our huge reno bill by not going with Wolf hoods (seem over-priced). Looking currently at a Best , PIK33 (36"), with a 900 CFM external blower, 6 plus sones ~ $1328, and another Best, CP47E362SB with 900 cfm ext blower 6 plus sones. ~ $1828. Also looking at the Faber, inca pro 38 (1100) cfm internal fan, 3.5-6.5 sones, for around ~$1899. Finally, the Tornado II, 38", 1000 cfm. (8 sones max) ~ $1778. Any help from all of you would be appreciated.

They each have their own little features. My concerns is to have one that is easiest to keep clean, that is as quiet as is realistically possible, and one that canautomatically shut off or increase speed through sensors.

 

Thanks, River

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by redriverbluespa View Post

Searing can create a good amount of smoke and vapour.  I want to know if there's more advice re the range hood.

We are looking at several others right now, inserts, and are trying to shave some cost off our huge reno bill by not going with Wolf hoods (seem over-priced). Looking currently at a Best , PIK33 (36"), with a 900 CFM external blower, 6 plus sones ~ $1328, and another Best, CP47E362SB with 900 cfm ext blower 6 plus sones. ~ $1828. Also looking at the Faber, inca pro 38 (1100) cfm internal fan, 3.5-6.5 sones, for around ~$1899. Finally, the Tornado II, 38", 1000 cfm. (8 sones max) ~ $1778. Any help from all of you would be appreciated.

They each have their own little features. My concerns is to have one that is easiest to keep clean, that is as quiet as is realistically possible, and one that canautomatically shut off or increase speed through sensors.

 

Thanks, River


i've heard that for a charbroiler, you need at least 1,000cfm, if not 1,200.
post #5 of 11

Almost,  nay, just as important as the exhaust capacity is provisions for make up air, commonly provided for in commercial installations but many times overlooked in home installations.

 

Remember, 1,200 cfm is 1,200 cubic feet per minute, that is the volume of air in a 10'x15' room with 8' ceilings!

 


If you're exhausting that much air every minute, you need to supply that same amount from somewhere.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 11

Thanks BSCepter and Pete,

yes, most of the fans we're looking at are 900 cfm and some boast higher equivalency. As far as the air situation, we've been told we shouldn't require an extra air supply as our 50's home certainly isn't as tight as today's homes. There should be enough air just from the leaks of the home. We'll sure be watching for this though, to make sure it's true.

Keep the info coming,

thanks,

River

post #7 of 11

Many home exhaust vent out but unlike commercial applications the amount of return of air is in a lot of cses overlooked. As Pete points out in his post it 1200 cfm pulls out all the air from a very large room. Trick now is to replace it.  Most home exhaust don't do it correctly.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 11

Thanks you two,

I'm really going to have to address this issue with my salesman. He swears that he feels we'll be fine without. I wish I knew someone in a similar situation who could advise me. I'm going to look into air returns.

thanks again,

River

post #9 of 11

Salesman will tell you anything to sell it. Stop in to a restaurant supply place and ask one of them. Or call up a local engineering school and ask them. They will be happy to answer you.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #10 of 11

Thanks, Chefedb

I can see a spot behind my furnace where an old clean-out shoot must have been. It will be easy to supply a fresh air vent to the floor by the furnace. I'm going to talk to a friend about the return air situation at his house (similar size/design).

looking into it.

River

 

post #11 of 11

We have a 36 inch Wolf duel-fuel range with the grill that we purchased in 2006.  The grill is terrific and we bought it because our appliance guy in Essex Vermont said it was the best residential indoor grill on the market.  Though it only has a "high" setting, you can move the food around for cooler spots when necessary.  

We have enjoyed grilling red peppers, beef tenderloins and salmon, etc....  Other more fatty foods can create quite a smoky situation.

For a hood, we have a "vent-a-hood" which again the appliance guy said was the best and most quiet - albeit, no hoods are quiet! 

I hope our positive experience with the Wolf range helps in your decision. 

PS.  The broiler never gets hot enough (!)

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