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Spanish Dish Pastel de Conejo: Rabbit Pie

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I came across this dish, casually mentioned, in a Time/Life book of the Cooking of Spain and Portugal.  A google search revealed recipies printed only in Spainish which I can't read.  Can someone please provide a recipe for this dish that's been translated into English?

 

TIA and Best,

 

-T

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 5

I translated a recipe from this website; http://www.directoalpaladar.com/recetario/pastel-de-conejo

So, all credits for the recipe to these people.

 

Looks like a delicious rabbit pâté and quite easy to make! As they say on the website, it's eaten as a hors d'oeuvre at festive days. Enjoy.

 

Ingredients;

1 rabbit of around 1 kilo (2lbs) with its liver, 250 grams pork chin, 4 slices of pancetta 50mm (1/5th inch) thick and another less thick portion of pancetta, just enough to cover the mold (a rectangular terrine with a lid), 200 grams of flour, 2 shalots, 1 egg, 1/2 cup of brandy, 2 laurel leaves, 1 sprig of thyme, 1 small teaspoon of mixed spices, a little salt and pepper

 

Preparation;

To save time and work, when buying the rabbit, ask the butcher to debone it and to cut it in cubes. Put the cubes in a big bowl and add the chopped liver, laurel and the chopped shalots, the thyme, the spices, salt and pepper.

Moisten all that with the brandy and mix well, cover the bowl with clingfilm and put in the fridge for 4 hours.

Mince the pork chin and pancetta very finely. Mix both meats with the rabbit preparation and add the beaten egg. Stir well.

Prepare the terrine; cover the bottom and sides with the rest of the pancetta. Fill with the rabbit preparation. Press gently with a spoon and close the terrine.

Mix the flour with 2 spoonfulls of water, mix and form into a dough roll and close the terrine using this dough and pressing the lid in.

Cook au bain marie (hot water bath) in the oven pre-heated at 180°C (350°F) for 70 minutes. Take the terrine out of the oven and let cool entirely before putting it in the fridge. It has to stay at least 12 hours in the fridge before you can de-mold it and serve.

 

 

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

@ChrisB: thanks!  Pork chin, dunno' if that can be procured in the U.S..  Would chicken liver be a suitable substitute for rabbit liver?  And I'm wondering what could be substituted for pork chin.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

And one more comment that I'll quote from the book:

 

"...At night, during San Fermin, a pastel de conejo  (rabbit pie) us served, the meat sunk in a light potato paste that has been tinged with the flavors of wild rosemary and thyme..."

 

I wonder what the light potate paste consists of.  And again thanks very much for all of your time.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 5

Pork chin is often used to make pork minced meat that you buy in any supermarket. In fact, you simply need quite fatty pork minced meat, a little more coarse than usual.

Pâté needs fat to hold together and above all for the taste. Also, rabbit is very lean meat, so it needs fat. A good pâté is a matter of delicat and exact seasoning and adding spices and herbs, often a family secret... 

A good trick is to prepare your meat, take a teaspoon of meat and fry in a pan. How does it taste? That's the criterium.

I would add a little chopped parcely, a few crushed all-spice corns, a few juniperberries, thyme. 

 

You do need the rabbit liver, it's so delicious! When you buy a whole rabbit, mostly it's offered with the liver, kidneys and heart. All of them are used! Chickenliver is no substitute. Better no liver at all than chickenliver in this recipe, imo.

 

I have no idea what they mean with potato paste. Could be anything.

I would serve this more as a tapa, just a small slice of pâté on a toasted piece of bread.

Some deluxe pâtés are baked in a pastry crust, maybe something similar?

 

 

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