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Pizza dough yeast question

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

The pizza dough recipe I'm looking at calls for 3 1/2 C bread flour and, among other ingredients, "1 package of yeast" that I assume to be Fleischmann's.  The yeast that I use is SAF Red Instant Yeast.  In googling for substitutions, I come up with substituting 2 1/4 tsp SAF yeast for 1 package of Fleischmann's.  Am I correct?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #2 of 6

Yeast is very forgiving, a table spoon is plenty enough.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

I don't know what you mean by the term "forgiving".  All I want to know is how much SAF yeast is required to cause the dough to rise within the time frame set forth by the recipe - approx 90 minutes.  And btw for the past 11 years since I embarked on breadbaking, I've used SAF Red exclusively and my bread is always made using a poolish, which is a kind of preferment and therefore I know a little something concerning dough and how to work it!  8^)

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 6

According to Michael Ruhlman, "Ratio, The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking", page 6-7, a standard yeast to flour ratio is 2 1/4 ounces to 4 cups of flour. However, in actuality, 1/8th teaspoon or 1/4 gram will also raise the same amount of flour, it will just take a longer time. The more yeast used, the faster the rise.

 

What is the difference? The flavor developed is inversely proportional to the rise time, i.e. quick rise > low flavor, longer rise>more flavor.

 

Yeast, regardless of its form, is a biologic entity that thrives and reproduces when food (starches and sugars) and water are available. How fast it generates carbon dioxide depends on:

  • how much yeast one starts with, and
  • how much food and water are available, and
  • what the temperature is (cooler > slower, warmer > faster

 

From what I've been able to learn, there is NO magic and precise answer. In fact, I do not use any additional yeast when making bread products using my 25 year old sourdough starter. Then again, it may take 24-72 hours to achieve the rise I'm looking for.

 

Using yeast as a rising agent is NOT the same as using chemical leveners such as baking soda or baking powder, the process is biologic, not chemical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

I don't know what you mean by the term "forgiving".  All I want to know is how much SAF yeast is required to cause the dough to rise within the time frame set forth by the recipe - approx 90 minutes.  And btw for the past 11 years since I embarked on breadbaking, I've used SAF Red exclusively and my bread is always made using a poolish, which is a kind of preferment and therefore I know a little something concerning dough and how to work it!  8^)



 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 6

Koko,

  Your calculations are right.

 A package is 1/4 oz.... 7g....2 1/4 tsp

                            1 oz....28g....3 tblsp

 

I think Dobzre meant that it can be a little less or a little more and it won't affect the final product.

With the SAF you can use 1 to 1 with Flmens on smaller recipes.

Larger recipes are usually 75%

HTH

Panini

 

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

@Panini:

 

Thx! for giving such a simple solution and yes, having used poolishes for about 10 years, I'm well aware that even a tiny read miniscule amount of yeast can rise quite a pile of flour if given sufficient time.  But this being my first experience at pizza making, I just wanted to work within the parameters of the recipe before going off on an exploratory journey.

 

@Dobzre:

 

I reread your post and yes, 1 TBS is within the range.  THX!


Edited by kokopuffs - 4/10/11 at 9:59am

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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