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Is it possible to salvage poorly cured hams?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Every year we purchase a half a hog from a local farmer. Overall we are very happy with the product but this year we had a major disappointment. The processing plant that farmer uses to break down the hogs also handles the curing of the bacon, hams and sausage preparation (breakfast, brats, etc).

 

The first time we purchased a hog we opted for breakfast sausage from the scraps and we cured the bacon ourselves. When we picked up the meat we noticed that one of the ingredients used in the breakfast sausage was MSG. Going forward to avoid this we just opted for ground pork and made them ourselves.

 

This year the farmer used a different processing plant that offers organic (aka: no msg) when curing hams, bacon, and sausage preparation. As a result we opted to have the plant cure the hams for us. What we (and other friends) ended up with were grey, tastless hams. It is truly unfortunate because it is a lot of meat that just doesn't even taste good. 

 

Does anyone know if you possibly soak the hams in a brine again to give it some flavor? There is some smoke on the meat because it was smoked but other than that it is just a big grey hunk of meat.

 

Thanks,

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #2 of 10
Thread Starter 

Beuhler... Beuhler.. Anyone, anyone????

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #3 of 10

I wish I could help you Nicko....

 

You invest all that money to have that happen. I asked my father about it but he has never re-brined. It would be interesting to know though.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 10

If they're gray, the didn't use the nitrates/nitrites.  For a wet cured ham, i wouldn't trust these as nitrates protect against bacteria growth.  If it was a dry cured ham I'd still be pretty leery of it.

 

I think I'd go back to the processor and complain about the product and demand a refund, at least a partial one. Mention it to your grower too, not for a refund of course but so he knows.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 10

Be extremely careful, if not cured correctly they could be harboring all kinds of bacteria. In particular if no nitrtes or nitrates were used, and based on the change of color I do not think they were as both are the things that keep meat red along with saltpeter.      

 

  Mushroom girl works a lot with hogs perhaps she could guide you better. But Remember  "If in doubt throw itout'' and better safe then sorry.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 10

That truly sucks, but I agree with everyone else, toss it out.  I wouldn't risk it.  And I agree, it sounds like they didn't use any nitrites and nitrates and without those, and in such a large piece of meat, you can run into serious bacterial concerns.

post #7 of 10

Nicko, what has the producer to say about this? Can he guarantee it will have no negative effect on you health, or not?

 

Also, gray color isn't always bad. It means indeed like Phatch said the absence of nitrates/nitrites which are used to preserve the color but are in fact very bad for your health!

I would ask the producer what to do with it.

post #8 of 10

Nitratesand nitrites are bad but then so is sodium benzoate which for years has been used in almost every product as a preservative. In fact if over 1/10 of 1% is used it could really make you sick and  is classified as a poison.

Years ago babies who suffered from not being able to down food were given minute forms of arsenic to open the valve pathway to their stomachs.. For that matter milk could also be bad for health if to much ingested. As could anything. Moderation is the key . I still would not use that ham and would make the guy take it back or tell him I was taking it to the health dept for their opinion.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 10

 

Quote:

 It means indeed like Phatch said the absence of nitrates/nitrites which are used to preserve the color but are in fact very bad for your health! 

 

They are better than the alternative which is the possible presence of botulism or other food borne pathogens in cured meat products.  As far as I know there is no alternative product that prevents possible botulism contamination in the curing of meats.

post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete View Post

 

 

They are better than the alternative which is the possible presence of botulism or other food borne pathogens in cured meat products.  As far as I know there is no alternative product that prevents possible botulism contamination in the curing of meats.


that  is~~

 

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