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Zabaione problem - Page 2

post #31 of 36

interesting recipe with the raspberry beer...why is it called a gratin? because you put it under a salamander? personally i think zabaglione is better with a mix of fresh berries not tropical fruits...figs are wonderful, but to me seem an odd pairing with the papaya and pineapple..oh well, "to each his own", said the farmer as he kissed his cow! for hollandaise i don't use a bain marie, but for zabaglione i always do, but i am usually making making larger amounts for catered dinner parties of 75 and up. between making zabaglione and polenta i practically need rotator cup surgery afterwards! have been toying with a savory zabaglione lately to top fish, salmon in particular. looking to make something with a little more oompf than a beurre blanc, not as heavy as a hollandaise, and fluffy...champagne or buerre blanc sabayon? capers? fresh thyme or dill....has this been done under a different name that i don't know? any ideas anyone?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #32 of 36

Joey,

 

If I am not mistaken, I think figs were the original fruit to go with sab. but Siduri would have alot more input on this .....I am a tad mainstream on this, any fruit in season, and if I can add a new flavor or twist , I will.

 

Were you thinking of Beurre Nantais ?

 

@ Chris, I think its fascinating that you have such talent as languages and Cheffing, "es maravilloso". 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #33 of 36

thanks petals,

 i'm not familiar with buerre nantais, but then again i'm not very french cooking savvy in the first place. you,on the other hand, are all things french, and i pay close attention to your posts for sure. i will definitely try the sauce as it sounds so lovely decadent and a perfect pairing for salmon. i think i am looking for something fluffier...kinda like buerre nantais meets sabayon...maybe lemon, capers, mait oui?...again, thanks mucho...

oh,about the figs with the sab...it's not about the figs, which i adore, just not sure about them with papaya (which i have been eating every day the size of footballs)!

when i boot up everything is in spanish...how do you suppose 'they' know that i am in mexico?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #34 of 36

Sabayon is easier than you're making it seem. It was my first egg sauce when I was 13.  Forget egg shells. That sounds like a pain. I understand that it could be considered traditional, but people were using spoons back then too.

 

Anyway. Your ratios are fine. If I'm making a bigger batch, I'll use 8 oz wine/ liquor, 10 yolks, and 8 oz sugar. But equal ratios are fine. Remember, a yolk is almost one oz.

 

Port makes an awesome Sabayon, as does any liquor. I use Grand Marnier or even most types of whiskey. Traditionally, they would use medeira or marsala....It's 2011, Use what you want.

 

Put your mixing bowl over the double boiler.Add liquor first. let it reduce just a bit. Add in your sugar and mix. Add in your eggs...not whipped like crazy....now whip like crazy until ribbons form. This is when you can see defined lines in what your sauce. Then cool and whip. This is technically a sabayon.

 

If you want: After its cooled a bit, fold it into some half whipped cream. For your 2 yolks,2oz sugar, 2 oz liquor I would use 4 oz cream.

 

Honestly, You're making a small batch and some times egg sauces are harder to make in a small batch. I suggest you double your batch. It's your first time, don't worry about wasting that much. After you get this down, then try out a smaller batch.

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

thanks petals,

 i'm not familiar with buerre nantais, but then again i'm not very french cooking savvy in the first place. you,on the other hand, are all things french, and i pay close attention to your posts for sure. i will definitely try the sauce as it sounds so lovely decadent and a perfect pairing for salmon. i think i am looking for something fluffier...kinda like buerre nantais meets sabayon...maybe lemon, capers, mait oui?...again, thanks mucho...

oh,about the figs with the sab...it's not about the figs, which i adore, just not sure about them with papaya (which i have been eating every day the size of footballs)!

when i boot up everything is in spanish...how do you suppose 'they' know that i am in mexico?

joey



Joey , I have a few sauces for your fish when you get back. Orange and caper is one then watercress cream is another.....enjoy your holiday. Your a True Chef at Heart. Bonne Nuit.

 

@ Something Tasty, You did a terrific job on your first Zabaione ! The picture looks amazing, well done.

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #36 of 36
Thread Starter 

Thank you Petals and everyone :)

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