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First Time Knife Buyer

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Well this is my first post.  Kinda exciting..I've been into cooking for a few years. I'm a personal trainer and I cook for my clients as well.  I basically try to come up with healthy, diet friendly dishes..lots of chicken and meat, haha.

 

So I'm looking to buy my first knife set.  I'd like to purchase from bed bath and beyond, simply because I need them in a hurry and I have a ton of those 20% off coupons.  I can spend about $450 right now on everything.

 

I don't have a knife block either, so I would need that as well.  I am leaning towards the Wusthof, but there are so many choices it's confusing the heck out of me.

 

Any guidance would be much appreciated :)

post #2 of 13
Thread Starter 

Slight change..I was looking at Cutlery and More and they have a much larger selection.  I noticed the MAC Superior set had a lot in it for a really good price. How does that stand against Wusthof?

post #3 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryanism View Post

Slight change..I was looking at Cutlery and More and they have a much larger selection.  I noticed the MAC Superior set had a lot in it for a really good price. How does that stand against Wusthof?

I'd go for the MAC personally. Then again, I LIKE MACs!
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #4 of 13

I like Mundial. My 10 inch chef's knife cost my 20 something US$ at a restaurant supply. In general, I would go for a decent, yet still cheap, stamped blade. Once you figure out the length and style you like, and get a hang of sharpening and steeling, then consider upgrading to a forged blade.

 

You don't need a full set either. I'd stick with:

Essential:

Chef's Knife/Cleaver/Santuku (depending on which style you like)

Paring Knife

Steel

 

Nice Optional:

Offset serrated (for bread, tomatoes, pastries, etc)

Flexible Boning (If you need to deal with whole fish or chicken)

Round tipped scalloped edge slicer (roast meats, etc)

 

You don't need a knife block. Get edge guards/sheathes instead. EdgeGuardKnifestorage.jpg

 

 

Knife blocks are doubly useless for you because they aren't portable. Get a knife roll/bag.

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

Any other suggestions on that site for my price range?

post #6 of 13

Generally speaking, Forschner/Victorinox rules the bang for the buck point. You can get a good 8 or 10" chefs knife for $40-$50 bucks. It performs on a par with the Wusthof/Henkels quality lines. If you get into cooking and want something with improved edge holding, then you get into knives in the 100+ dollar category and specialty japanese, will outperform the comparably priced Wusthof Hekenkls and even the Shuns.

 

You go up from there but the improvements are incremental rather than exceptional. As a general rule, experienced cooks advise against sets. You need a chefs, a serrated bread knife and a paring knife. Some would add a 6-8" petty in the mix too.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

I did plan on spending more than that, and I do like forged. The sets just seem good because I need a knife block as well.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
post #9 of 13

A 10 inch Chefs is more efficient. It can be awkward at first but I strongly suspect you'll come to prefer the larger size if you give it a chance.


 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #10 of 13

I just checked. I'm packing a Mundial 8 incher. I feel so inadequate now... I got it because it's easier to carry in my backpack. My old 10 would get dislodged from the sheath and poke holes.

 

 

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

haha. Jeez, there are too many choices, makes it hard to choose..almost as bad as car shopping haha

 

This is somewhat of a gift to me and my girlfriend.  I know she wants the block, and we need sheers as well..that's why I'm looking at sets.

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryanism View Post

haha. Jeez, there are too many choices, makes it hard to choose..almost as bad as car shopping haha

 

This is somewhat of a gift to me and my girlfriend.  I know she wants the block, and we need sheers as well..that's why I'm looking at sets.


Two or three good knives are better than six or seven mediocre knives. Blocks take up valuable counter space. You are also going to need to have some way to sharpen them, and I don't mean the steel or ceramic rods that come with most sets. These rods are useful for straightening the edge of an already sharp knife that has folded to one side through use. They cannot sharpen a dull knife.

 

I know you feel an urgency to "get something", but I suggest that you step back and do some research. There are plenty of websites to get information from. One of the best is Chad Ward's "Edge in the Kitchen" blog - http://www.chadwrites.com/ He has written a very good book of the same name, available at Amazon, and I highly recommend it.Get the book, read it, and you should now have enough information to make good decisions about the knives you need. http://www.amazon.com/dp/0061188484/

 

Best of luck,

 

Rick

 

post #13 of 13

I'm getting a little redundant on these knife threads, but I know If I like it, someone else will. I went to my local Asian market and got a $4 Kiwi brand knife. So light, so if that's something you might be into. Good luck on this quest.

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