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What is your favorite thing to grill? - Page 2

post #31 of 55

Bone-In Prime Rib (More Pictures to come)

We, are cooking up a Bone in Prime Rib for Mother's Day. I took a few pictures of the Rib so you guys could see how to order it from your butcher. You want to ask that the Chine and feather bones be removed, have them tied back on if you like. I had my whole cow processed so I didn't have them tied back on. The objective is so you could cut a slice of prime rib thats still on the bone. My butcher didn't do a real good job on leaving me a fat cap on top of the rib, if I knew this earlier I could have got some pieces of fat to protect and cover the exposed meat. These are a few pictures to show the cut and how it should look.........More pictures to come
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 Ready for the BBQ, heavily seasoned with Cajun spices, seasoned salt, granulated garlic, salt and pepper.........
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 This is the Prime Rib at 1 3/4 hrs about 100 on the end cuts and 70 degrees in the ctr. I'll be looking for 110 in the center, that will still give me thick cut end pieces at Mr and the ctr will be Rare.
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 The Prime Rib turned out real good, melt in your mouth tender, all I needed was horseradish sauce. It was Red from end to end, Cooked on the BBQ for 2 1/2 hrs, nice crust on the outside, I could not have asked for anything better. Prime Rib is all about beef flavor, this did not disappoint.
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The Prime Rib turned out real good, melt in your mouth tender, all I needed was horseradish sauce. It was Red from end to end, Cooked on the BBQ for 2 1/2 hrs, nice crust on the outside, I could not have asked for anything better. Prime Rib is all about beef flavor, this did not disappoint.
 
 
 
post #32 of 55

ChefBilly, what lucky mother got to feast on this?!  I'm drooling, what a great idea.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #33 of 55

The Mother of my Children and my Wife for the last 34 years..................Mom, Wife, Friend, lover, Doctor, Gardener, Window washer, Painter,Care Giver, Chauffeur,Dog Groomer, Dishwasher, Bed maker, Duster,Cook, Shopper, and also works in my Business.................

post #34 of 55

Loin lamb chops.  Rub them with Dijon, fresh pressed garlic, fresh thyme, salt and pepper and grill to medium rare.  We get Sonoma lamb from our local butcher and I can't think of any meat more tasty or tender.  Great with side of pesto pasta or a pea and potato and mint salad dressed just with white wine vinegar and olive oil.  Makes my mouth water just remembering the last time...

post #35 of 55

Welcome to Cheftalk, glwestcott.

 

Comparing lamb chops to anything else is kind of unfair, donchathink? I mean, whether grilled or otherwise prepared, not much holds a candle to sitting down in front of a very large platter filled with very small lamb chops. thumb.gif

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #36 of 55

Whatever meat is on sale cheap that looks good lol.gif pulled pork, ribs, chicken leg quarters, the seasoning changes with what I have on hand and what I am in the mood for. Now this guy was insane, he grilled an entire cow butterflied http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704187604576289162282275474.html?mod=ITP_AHED

post #37 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

Whatever meat is on sale cheap that looks good lol.gif pulled pork, ribs, chicken leg quarters, the seasoning changes with what I have on hand and what I am in the mood for. Now this guy was insane, he grilled an entire cow butterflied http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704187604576289162282275474.html?mod=ITP_AHED



Now by golly that was an interesting read, but I'll be darned if I give that a go.  Even though here in AZ the bad weather ain't likely to happen.!

post #38 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by abefroman View Post

I love Bulgogi on the grill.


 

You inspired me Abefroman!

I finally found an “asian grocery” here and they cut their own meats.

I found the bulgogi meat in the freezer case, and it was quite reasonably priced.

So last night I made up my marinade and put up the meat to soak all night and then all day long today.  Also I am going to make Kong Namul (bean sprout salad) and a quick cucumber kim chee, not to mention a fresh pot of rice to cap this feast off!!

ONO-licious!!


 

 

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #39 of 55

Only two things come to mind really...lamb and veggies..specifically squash, zuc., eggplant, and tomatoes.

 

 

post #40 of 55

 

I really enjoy lamb basted with some olive oil, dusted with herbes de provence, salt and freshly ground black pepper and a squeeze of fresh lemon.

Large shrimp fresh from the market , covered in olive oil , minced garlic then sprinkled with course salt and grilled..........sublime .

Of course it is a dish that must be eaten with your fingers and savored .

.........all seafood in between......

 

 

Grilled mushrooms , endives, asparagus, zucchini, artichokes, eggplant, corn, .........so many flavors.

 

My favorite app would be oysters with horseradish cream on the grill and served hot .

 

The humble potato adorned in Greek, Italian, or Peruvian flavors are welcome, in fact just about most flavors are.....its so humble. Oh and yes, sweet potato  gently roasted...

 

Roasted bulb of garlic basted with olive oil and salt. Served with a baguette.

The sweetness of a roasted Spanish onion, or any onion.

Beef : love adding the flavor of Thai to it. Filet mignon: med-rare.

 

Enjoy many sauces, a favorite is Romesco sauce and of course Aioli (all types) and made in the mortar.

Sauce for duck: cinnamon cherry or my orange ginger that I make and use on pork as well.

Lemon honey.

 

Desserts: grilled pineapple, figs with a mix of honey and rose water and cinnamon. (brazilian or Persian flare )

 

Cap the grilling off with a fire lit ouzo and a coffee bean. OPA ! 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #41 of 55

Pulled pork.  Eat it as standard Carolina-style PP, in tacos or enchiladas, in a tomato sauce over pasta, in an Asian-style noodle soup...  Grill-roasted tri-tip, beer can chicken, RIBS RIBS RIBS homemade bacon...

The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #42 of 55

Question...why has the cost of lamb in the supermarket skyrocketed??

I love lamb anyway you want to give it to me, but gessssss ..... come on!!  It was $7.99/lb for leg/bone in at Costco for crying out loud...

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #43 of 55

Hmm? Let me think......... I got it..... Everything!

post #44 of 55

Red Meat. 

 

Since last July my favorite cut has been the "hanger steak", also called the "hanging tender". To me, if done right, it has the tenderness of a fillet with the flavor of rib eye. I got a pkg. yesterday (Sat.- Rapture day) of around 9 1/2 lbs. (4 pcs.) for $2.64/lb. I took my lolly-sweet time trimming them out losing less than 1 1/2 lbs. of waste. I'm getting much better trimming but not so much faster. Each piece trims out to what are like 2 tenderloins. The biggest difference is the grain of the meet. You need to pay attention to cutting after cooking because it's really easy to cut wrong and go with the grain instead of against it. Anyway, I season them up with healthy splashes of olive oil and worcestershire sauce, and a good sprinkle of basic steak seasonings. I let them sit while I do everything else. I have a cast iron grill plate on my grill. I love the bageebies out of that thing. I let it get screaming hot (5 mins.) before I toss on the meat. The first 4 mins. are on high flame, then I turn it down to lowest and give them 8 more mins. turning twice. Bee-U-Tee-Full! By the time I clean down the grill and set up in the kitchen they are ready to cut. 

 

I have found a really good use for a particular part of the trim. There is a very nasty connective tissue membrane running between the two chunks of meat that has to be trimmed out. No matter how good you trim this out there will be some meat left on. I take my knife and scrape the meat off the membrane and use it as instant fond, the brown bits in the pan as it were. In a small pan I saute these up with a finely minced shallot and some butter. I pour in the juice from the plate, reduce it for a few seconds and voilà, killer jus. 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #45 of 55

Thank You ChefBillyB for the pics that you have shared with us. If I may, I need everyone interested to look at the second pic as an example for something I have tried to copy. There is a fantastic over-the-top meat market/butcher shop in California that has this thing called the "rib cap". A number of people I've spoken with think this is the best thing since cooked food. That's all well and good, however these guys are going for $120 for +/- 3lbs. LOL @ Me, I can't afford that no chance. So the first time I tried to replicate this I made a big mistake and listened to a guy with no real clue. I ended up buying a pkg. of meat listed as "lifter meat". I have since found out that this cut is good for stew, pot-roast, chili or something that cooks for a couple hours. The actual cut needed is the crescent of the rib eye. You need to gently follow the natural seam of the fat and cut off the crescent, or "cap" of meat. It should look like a fatty flank steak (that is a good thing). The big chunk of meat left has since been tagged as the "Saratoga Rib Steak". I then trimmed out some of the fat so as to even out the piece for rolling. I wiped down the inside with some olive oil and gently sprinkled in some steak seasoning. I then carefully rolled and tied it up. The final piece was too big for anything I had to sear it in or on, so I cut it in half. I'm not sure I'd do that again. Anyway, I seared it up on all sides, let it relax back to room temp, then put it in the oven @ 300* until the inside hit 130* (probably 135*). It came out with a nice crust, and the juices from the pan made a really nice jus. It still turned out to be an expensive cut, but all together I had a really cool thing, and the Saratoga steaks were still yummy rib eyes w/o the crescent piece. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #46 of 55

First-time griller, new Weber gas grill.  So far EVERYTHING has been wonderful, except the slices of eggplant.  The steaks, the bbq ribs, the hunks of sweet bell pepper and the fat stalks of asparagus have been fabulous (we were fighting over the last stalk). Maybe the grill wasn't hot enough for the eggplant, or it didn't get cooked long enough.  It was yucky and rubbery.  We just brushed all the veggies with olive oil and salted on both sides.  Any suggestions about the egg plant?

post #47 of 55

This is Spanish take on an eggplant salad that's very popular all over the Med.  In addition, I've had something very like much it at every outdoor Armenian gathering I've ever been to, and I've been to plenty (long story).

 

Anyway, here's how: 

 

Slice the eggplant (in half if it's a Japanese eggplant, or in slices if it's an Italian egglplant); salt it on the cut sides, and let it sit for a couple of hours.  Brush all the salt off, then brush the eggplant generously with olive oil.  Cook the eggplant until cooked through to very tender, and set it aside.  Grill some peppers (bell and pobolanos), and some onion slices.  Remove the peppers when they're charred and hold them in a closed paper or plastic bag until they soften.  Cook the onion until it's softened and sweet.

 

Peel most but not all of the skin off the peppers, and cut them in bite size pieces, about 3/4" long x 3/8" wide.  Cut the onion slices into quarters, and break them up into onion strings. 

 

Cut tomatoes in thick slices, brush them with oil, salt them, and grill them until they're just heated through.  Chop them coarsely.  

 

Mash the eggplant, mix in the remaining vegetables, add some capers (either dried, reconstituted in warm water, and rinsed; or bottled and drained), mix in a little (won't need much) best-quality extra virgin olive oil, and add smoked (preferably hot) paprika and salt to taste.  Chopped anchovies are optional and delightful.  Adjust for salt and pepper.  Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil (top should be glistening), a little more paprika, and plenty of freshly chopped parsley.  

 

Serve with very fresh bread or flat bread.

 

If you want a formal recipe with times and quantities, I'll write it up.  But if you keep the proportions al gusto ("to taste"), you'll be fine. 

 

Hope you like,

BDL

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post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munchie1 View Post

We just brushed all the veggies with olive oil and salted on both sides.  Any suggestions about the egg plant?

I use the same method you do, with great results! Cut the eggplants into 1"1/2 thick slices, brush both sides with olive oil, salt & pepper AT THE LAST MINUTE (otherwise the eggplants will start releasing a bitter liquid), onto a really hot grill, wait 1-2mn, rotate 90 degrees, wait 1-2mn (this creates nice cross hatch grill marks), flip and repeat, and if the slices are still not soft enough transfer to a slower part of your grill until cooked through. DELICIOUS!!!

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

I use the same method you do, with great results! Cut the eggplants into 1"1/2 thick slices, brush both sides with olive oil, salt & pepper AT THE LAST MINUTE (otherwise the eggplants will start releasing a bitter liquid), onto a really hot grill, wait 1-2mn, rotate 90 degrees, wait 1-2mn (this creates nice cross hatch grill marks), flip and repeat, and if the slices are still not soft enough transfer to a slower part of your grill until cooked through. DELICIOUS!!!

 

Some folks salt the eggplant slices 30 - 40 minutes before cooking, then rinse off the bitter liquid right before cooking.  I may have to get some eggplant and try it both ways to see if there is a difference.

 

mjb.

 

ps:  There used to be this Chinese place in town that had the BEST eggplant in a spicy brown garlic sauce that I really liked.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post

 

Some folks salt the eggplant slices 30 - 40 minutes before cooking, then rinse off the bitter liquid right before cooking.  I may have to get some eggplant and try it both ways to see if there is a difference.

There is: if you get them rid of their liquid they'll be limp, thin, dry and shapeless. I don't recommend that for that specific application. 

 

I do, on the other hand, salt them to get them rid of their liquid when preparing for example eggplant caviar. 

post #51 of 55

For the last year or so I've been going with smaller eggplants and not salting at all.   There's been NO problemmo at all. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #52 of 55

I like grilling skirt and flank steaks. Nothing to it, really, but so damn tasty.

 

off topic...this is the first year in our new home, and it's the first time we've lived in a house that has vinyl siding... and the first time we bbq'd near it...let's just say we didn't realize how easily plastic could melt.


Edited by Pollopicu - 5/28/13 at 8:34pm
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #53 of 55

One favorite of mine is flat iron steak.  A nice marinade, quickly grilled to mid rare directly over hot coals - quite tasty, don't taste like melted plastic at all.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #54 of 55

I love spareribs with a gold sauce, bone-in country ribs with a kickin' sauce  and hanging tenders with white radish. Yum!  Real brats and burgers are o.k. for the kids that can't be patient.

post #55 of 55

I love spareribs with a gold sauce, bone-in country ribs with a kickin' sauce  and hanging tenders with white radish. Yum!  Real brats and burgers are o.k. for the kids that can't be patient.

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