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"Green Hare"

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I was chatting to a 'foody' the other day and one of the things she was saying is that there is a group of people in Europe that kill then bury a domestic animal underground for storage. Apparently they treat it a particular way...and by that I mean nothing that you would consider hygienic.

The animal is literally put in a hole and covered with dirt or mud, left there for months and then dug up and eaten later on. Has any one else heard of such practice?

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post #2 of 12

Which 'group of people' in Europe'?

 

I'm in Europe, but a different place to Siduri, who is also in Europe, and a different place to Welshchef who is also in Europe or KK's family who are in another part of Europe.....

post #3 of 12

Gravlax (buried Salmon) were buried in the sand (middle ages) and consumed later. The only food in Europe I can think of.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

I will try to dig up more info....

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post #5 of 12

It's a bit like us Europeans saying that ALL Australians live on Wichetty grubs!

 

(Having visited there quite a few times, I know that's not true - but the Australian addiction to adding 'colour' to drinks and food is all too common)

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Ishbel it's nothing like, not even close. A group could be enthusiasts, a community, scientists and yes I have also travelled so I know how big Europe is. As I said I will try to find out some more about the topic.

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post #7 of 12

Perhaps you will acknowledge that, as a 'European' I've got a right to be concerned at your comment?

 

You may have travelled, but your post was pretty weird.

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

I thought the same thing. Who in their right mind would kill an animal, bury it then dig it up months later. Have they not heard of fridges? I know that there is a group of "scientists / nutritionists / (researchers) studying the technique that these people use. What is of interest is the bacteria and why don't these people get sick. 

 

The comment was not aimed at you or any other European person. It was a statement that simply gave a geographical location to this mysterious group of people that practice some rather interesting techniques. The fact that I mentioned Europe (rather than Australia) should make it more believable, for humidity, temperature are one your side and cultural practice are far more alive there than here in Australia. We are Australian so we do have "a culture", but we simply copy what every one else is doing.

 

A great indicator is the activity that surrounds market places in Europe. What a wonderful vibe, here in Oz we are still "cutting our teeth" when it comes to cultural activities.

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post #9 of 12

There appeared to be plenty of street markets around when I last visited Australia - great produce at The Rocks in Sydney, ditto Melbourne and rural NSW at Mogo.  Good produce, cheeses and other comestibles like home-made chutnies and jams.

post #10 of 12

You would not by any chance talking about antiquated freezing processes which were practiced  would you ? and if so it was not only in Europe.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

Chef B,

Not sure, I will chat to Jodi again in the next week or so. Jodi works for Tetsuya which is where she first herd of the whole thing. I will post some more when I have chatted to her.

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post #12 of 12

Icelandic Hákarl (from a type of shark) is the only thing I can think of that is still made this way today. The reason for the burying is to remove toxic substances from the flesh, both via the pressing out of fluids and through fermentation. It reportedly smells very bad but tastes OK. I personally would want to try it if I got the chance and don't consider it particularly unhygienic compared to, for example, most appallingly-farmed chicken you would buy in the supermarket.

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