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Looking for desserts found in diners in the 50s

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Hello,

Yes, I already have the book Diner Desserts. But other than that book I cannot find any other desserts that people ate at diners in their childhood and would like to see again. Ive already started quizzing our older guests and thought Id post here too. So far Ive gotten "Sundae" by a variety of people.

Thanks in advance.:chef:
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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post #2 of 28
Shawty cat.

if you have some patience I can help you with that. For the moment I have to send an article to Nicko and to organse a non-party ... LOL Pretty busy for the week-end

I will check Cornell's database. I find Cornell's system complicated so, if any other member knows how to use this sophisticated data base quickly and effectively...be my guests and if it requires password, send me a PM I will pass you mine :)
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks Athenaeus:) ,

I have lots of patience. Thanks for searching for me. Cant wait to hear the results of the search.:bounce: :bounce: :bounce:
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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post #4 of 28
Wayne Harley Brachman!!!!!!!!
Cakes and Cowpokes and
Retro Desserts

Look for them at your local library. He's the bestest.:D
post #5 of 28
Retro Desserts is really the very best! :p
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #6 of 28
PIE PIE PIE!!!!!!! Cakes too....Brownies ala mode, probably some jello shtuff, cobblers....pie pie pie
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #7 of 28
Shawty - Take a look at Junior's cookbook (Junior's of Brooklyn); he's got some awesome stuff in the book, and they've been around forever.

Also, not exactly desserts, but killer muffins, danish pastries, etc.

Shroom - 'jello shtuff'?? LOL - reminds me of my hubbie's family reunions in NC!!
__________________
"Like water for chocolate"
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"Like water for chocolate"
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post #8 of 28
I was just a girl then but I do remember Cherries Jubilee, Strawberries Romanoff and Peach Melba. And what about those Black & Whites that were sold at bakeries and delis all over the New York area.

And Fruit-Cocktail Gelatin was another expression meaning Jello for grown-ups! :rolleyes:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 
Ill definately go look up those books at B&N. Ill give you a list of what we offer now:

Banana Splits
Boston Cream Pie
Fruit Pies
Chocolate & Banana Cream Pie
Jello
Rice & Bread Pudding
Black & White cookies
Oatmeal, Walnut, Chocolate Chip Cookies (thats one cookie)
Peanut Butter Cookies
Danishes
Banana Caramel Pudding
Chocolate Pudding
Brownies a la mode
Sundaes
Italian Icebox Cake (I personally make this since no one else knows how) :rolleyes:
Egg Creme
Floats

The fruit pies, danishes, cookies, puddings, sundaes and brownies are a staple and I usually rotate in other things. I wasn't sure if we were selling most of the authentic diner desserts people love. :blush: I guess I should stop worrying. Ive started taking requests from customers.

Sometimes I think we have too many desserts! But most people like to order burgers, fries and dessert or coffee and dessert. The truckers order a complete meal and dessert. So we cannot get rid of any of them since everyone always orders something.

Thanks for the replies and the heads up on the books. Im off to B&N.
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #10 of 28
LOL marmalady...I was going to recommend Junior's cookbook...but I see you beat me to it!

Best cheesecake in the world...and love the other recipes too!

Nancy
post #11 of 28
Shawty -
Coconut cream pie
A mile high coconut cake
Devil's food cake - or a 'Brooklyn Blackout cake
Mile-high lemon meringue pie
Strawberry pie
Carrot cake
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"Like water for chocolate"
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"Like water for chocolate"
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post #12 of 28
What's kinda interesting are the diners that become known for one specialty, they may or maynot have other selections but they are reknown for one thing....Junior's cheesecake, Natichodaes(?) meat pie place has gingerbread with custard and topping, THERE are more but I'm running out of time....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 
I guess we are now known for my brownies and "oatmeal, walnut & chocolate chip cookies". I have people coming from MO just to get them. I bake em fresh. No box here. CIA recipe for Fudge Brownies.
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #14 of 28
Richard Sax's book Classic Home Desserts would also be a great reference, Shawtycat -- plus, it's a fabulous read. Some of the desserts he mentions are famous recipes from noted diners or restaurants; all of them are good, neat, yummy examples of traditional down-home cookin', of many nationalities.
post #15 of 28
What? No malteds or soda concoctions like rootbeer floats? Rather than with my meal, I love these for desserts at diners.
SmartGirl to the rescue!
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SmartGirl to the rescue!
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post #16 of 28
Oo, yes! I have this great little cookbook, I forget what it's called, and it's the entire menu of a Classic Soda Counter! The fancy sandwiches, every kind of float and malted and fizz and sundae... how to make the syrups...

It has very cute illustrations, and quotations from old-time soda jerks, too. Just a tiny little thing, a hundred pages maybe, but it is very cool, even though it certainly makes it sound as though going for the classic soda fountain offerings takes great dedication and attention to detail.
post #17 of 28
Shawtycat do you own the book "Blue Plate Special- The American Diner Cookbook" by Elizabeth McKeon and Linda Everett? I've made several recipes from this book and REALLY really like it!
It has many fountain drinks...too many to list, parfaits, malts and fizzes which of course... I'd like to taste all of those too.

Their desserts are as follows:
Applesauce cake, apple-raisin rum cake, apple spice cake, raw apple cake, banana cake, chocolate cake, black forest, carrot, lemon, orange, sour cream, mississippi mud, pineapple upside down, angel food, velveteen, strawberry, pound, chocolate brownies, diner cheesecakes, black & white cheesecake.

Then they have a section on pies: strawberry cream cheese pie, apple ppie, banana cream pie, caramela pie, chocolate chiffon pie, choc, custard pie, choc, cream pie, choc. marshmellow pie, key lime pie, lemon meringue, lemon chiffon, fresh peach, pecan, peach upside down, peanut butter, pumpkin, raisin, raspberry, custard.

Going into cobbler: apple, peach, apple pan dowdy, apple crisp.

Apple studel, blueberry strata, blackberry slump, jello, choc. pudding, lemon pudding, rice pud., custard, tapioca, chocolate banana tapioca.

It kind of looks like diner desserts are very similar to Amish recipes...lots of overlaping with pies, cake and cobblers. I also own alot of older baking books from name brands product and companies (like Hersheys, Jello, Pillsbury, Betty Crocker). There's quite a rang of desserts to work from and it's really a fun topic.
This book also contains some diner slang phrases which are amusing....anyway I high reccomend this book.

Looking at your menu....what I might do.....loose the danish and make donuts (very pop. and authentic)...I'd go with a chocolate peanut butter pie (always a big seller) on gram. crust. Maybe some layered jello paraits in float glasses just for looks in your case (provided you have a show case)...maybe switch out some fruit pies for slumps and crisps because crisps and such are far easier to make, hold and serve in different qanitities. Also they love that hot fruit crisp ala mode.....hey what about fudge wrapped in wax paper, it holds well and is true to that time period...


etc.... I have no limits of opinions and ideas when your talking desserts.......
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #18 of 28
Shawty Cat obviously you don't need me :)

The topic is very interesting though and I made a small research,generally on the food of the 50ies thanks for the inspiration.

More in Repast from the Past !!
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
Reply
post #19 of 28
Sorry, did I shut this conversation down....didn't mean to.
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 

What wuz that??

Compass Rose, What's the title of your book??? You never said and it sounds very interesting. Ive been dangling the idea about going back to authentic (but lower cal & fat) diner dishes. Great food with half the grease.

Wendy I will look that up at Amazon (cheaper than B&N). Thanks for the title. Maybe the Good Cook has it. I think I have enough points for a freebie. :)

Jodi
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #21 of 28
"What's Happening at Moody's Diner"

a cook book that takes you back to the 30's when the famous diner opened!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #22 of 28
Um,

Was Ambrosia from the 50's?

Wait a minute, This is not American right?:confused:
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #23 of 28
Thread Starter 
I found a "What's Cooking at Moody's Diner by Nancy Moody" for $8.95 at B&N and Amazon.

CC what's Ambrosia???:confused:
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
post #24 of 28

duh

sometimes my brain does not function! yes, "what's COOKING at moody's diner"
see if you can get one used! i got mine at kitchen arts and letters in NYC.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #25 of 28
Ambrosia is what Cape Chef feeding his clients with :)
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #26 of 28
~A~,

I don't know if that was supposed to be a compliment or not! :)

Shawntycat,

Ambrosia is the food of the gods in classical mythology. ( so American it is not).
The term may mean food in the narrow sense of eatables,in which case it is the counterpart of Nectar, the drink of the gods, or it may mean food in the wider sense of sustenance, when it embraces drink also.

What the gods were actually supposed to eat is a matter of conjecture.

In the English language any especially delicious food may be called ambroisia, but this has become pretty uncommon.

I think most think a over sweetned fruit, coconuts and marshmellows:eek:

Anyway Shanwtycat, I hope that answers your question ;)
cc
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #27 of 28
To add a detail.

Ambrosia was the food and drink with which the Olympian Gods preserved their Immortrality.
It supposed to be extraordionnary fragant and it was probably conceived of as a purified and idealized form of honey.

It was accompanied with nectar the wine of Gods.
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
Reply
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
Reply
post #28 of 28
Thread Starter 

Ahhhh

I knew about the Ambrosia of the Gods (passed greek mythology at the top of my class. And my sons are named Antonis and Dimitrious). I just thought that maybe CC came up with a decadent dessert. :blush:

Hey CC!,

Maybe you can come up with something decadent. We can call it "CC's Ambrosia". That could sell don't you think. Then when the customers ask Ill just recommend your place. Where is your place anyway? You know I actually don't know if you are a chef or pastry chef? :eek: :lol: Just kidding CC. BTW post more recipes. I love yours.

Jodi
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
Reply
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