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Cooking chicken to safe temp

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

I grilled a bunch of half breast today to mass produce alot of spicy chicken corn chowder from the food network recipe.  I figure with bone and skin on it has more flavor and the skin helps it not stick to the grill.

 

To the point.

 

Sometimes in the middle of meat you see dark red blood splotches, small, this is not a sign of undercooking I think but just happens right.

 

If in question when you make the final soup mix could you not let if boil or simmer for a good ten minutes to increase the likelyhood you had cooked the chicken completely.  Not that I think I undercooked it but in doubt that should help right.

 

Are there any clues that chicken is undercooked like a rubbery feeling?

 

Another point if you dont mind or two actually,

 

I ran out of containers so I can just put the soup in gallon freezer bags and freeze like that right.

 

Do you usually let food cool in the fridge for a while before hitting the freezer to not melt the frozen stuff.  I think this is pretty simple to figure out but some might have a good method.  I was putting it outside in the 45 degree temp for a while today to get the initial heat off.

 

The only way I can save time in the kitchen or one way is to mass produce. 

 

Thanks for the help.

post #2 of 4
Quote:

Originally Posted by kevin20422 View Post

 

Sometimes in the middle of meat you see dark red blood splotches, small, this is not a sign of undercooking.

 

No, this is a sign of poor chicken butchering. Before you put your chicken on the grill, grab your knife and take away all nerve endings, blood spots etc...

 

 

Quote:
If in question when you make the final soup mix could you not let if boil or simmer for a good ten minutes to increase the likelyhood you had cooked the chicken completely.  Not that I think I undercooked it but in doubt that should help right.

 

No. Overcooking your chicken is a poor way to "help" it not being undercooked. Just cook it to the proper temp on the grill, and you won't have to worry about it afterwards. Think of cooking it the same way you would if you were to serve it to your guests right off the grill.

 

 

Quote:

Are there any clues that chicken is undercooked like a rubbery feeling?

 

The muscle feels soft when undercooked, firm when cooked through. The color also changes. You shouldn't see any trace of pink in the muscle.

 

 

Quote:

I ran out of containers so I can just put the soup in gallon freezer bags and freeze like that right.

 

Sure, why not.

 

 

Quote:

Do you usually let food cool in the fridge for a while before hitting the freezer to not melt the frozen stuff.  I think this is pretty simple to figure out but some might have a good method.  I was putting it outside in the 45 degree temp for a while today to get the initial heat off.

 

That's a good idea. The colder the item when it goes in the freezer, the faster (thus better) it will freeze. It's also a good idea not to stuff your freezer with 5 gallons worth of hot (or even cold) soup at once. Look at your freezer manual, it will tell you what freezing power you're working with (how many lbs of cold stuff you can freeze in a 24 hour period).

 

post #3 of 4

Hey Kevin - I be no expert.  I would expect that if you cooked it on the bone there could be some blood splotches which is just the bones letting off moisture, but if they were fillets I'd say they are a bit under.  But, if you are freezing them then cooking them further - no probs.

 

You've got to cool before you freeze.  It really is not good to cook then freeze immediately.  The plastic bags are fine, in fact they are good as you can rest them on a bed of ice to cool before you freeze.  Try to get as much air as you can out of the bag before you seal/tie a knot in the end, however you do it. Just bung some ice cubes in a tray and put the sealed bags flat over them, turn them once one side is cooled, then into the freezer when the second side is cooled.

 

It's odd about the rubberiness.  Normally it means overcooked.  Cooked right is still softish.  Dunno.

 

Hope some of this helps :)

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 

Both replies help and thanks to you very much for the valuable time you have taken to assist me.

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