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Raw egg prevention needed

post #1 of 60
Thread Starter 

Hi.. I have a family recipe for a cake that I would like to try out, but it's an older one and it includes raw eggs in its filling. I tried thinking out a way to cook the eggs but then I saw it also included whipped whites, so I would require your help.

 

First of all, the yolks. It says to cream 250 gr. butter with 125 gr. powdered sugar and then add 7 yolks one by one. How can I do this in a double boiler? I've done various things in a double boiler but not a cake filling, do I put all things at once, or first cream butter and sugar and then add the yolks? There must be a way and I am sure you know it.

 

Also, the whites. It says to beat 7 whites with 125 gr. powdered sugar and then mix the two fillings and add 200 gr. grated toasted walnuts. However, before we get to that, how can I replace the whites? I would be guessing heavy cream, although how much heavy cream (whipped) is equal to 7 whites and 125 gr. powdered sugar (whipped)?

 

I can't find such thing as preserved eggs or whatever so I will have to use the aforementioned way, hopefully getting some help on how to cook the yolks and substitute the whites. Thanks a lot! :)

post #2 of 60

You can't put butter in a double boiler.  You can get pasteurized eggs though.  Yep, in the shell, pasteurized.

 

 

post #3 of 60

Question to confusing for me.... Good Luck

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 60
Thread Starter 

Yeah, pausterised was the word. Can't find them around here.

 

Anyway, why can't I put creamed butter and sugar in the double boiler? It sounds stupid, but why not, or perhaps the yolks? There must be a way

post #5 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingTasty View Post

 

Anyway, why can't I put creamed butter and sugar in the double boiler? It sounds stupid, but why not, or perhaps the yolks? There must be a way


Because butter melts at little over 98.4 degrees.

 

post #6 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingTasty View Post

I tried thinking out a way to cook the eggs


Why? confused.gif

 

post #7 of 60
Thread Starter 

You know what I mean, cooking the yolks over a double boiler so that we kill the salmonella.

 

Kuan, I forgot that....

post #8 of 60
Thread Starter 

What about cooking the yolks for a bit and then adding as I would add the raw ones?

post #9 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingTasty View Post

You know what I mean, cooking the yolks over a double boiler so that we kill the salmonella.

 

Kuan, I forgot that....



Samonella normally comes off of the shells and if you buy good fresh eggs from a reputable company that's usually not a problem.

post #10 of 60
Thread Starter 

Still, I have paid attention so far and I would rather keep that way.

 

But I think it shouldn't be a problem to cook the yolks over a double boiler for a little time and then just add them to creamed butter when they have cooled?

post #11 of 60

What LongColts said. However, if you're serving an Immune compromised crowd you need other options. Powdered egg whites and yolks are also safe to use for this purpose, same as pasteurized.

post #12 of 60
Thread Starter 

I wouldn't have posted this if there was a chance to find powdered, pasteurised or any other alternative. All I can get is eggs from various companies which are not guarantee for their safety if eaten raw.

post #13 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingTasty View Post

I wouldn't have posted this if there was a chance to find powdered, pasteurised or any other alternative. All I can get is eggs from various companies which are not guarantee for their safety if eaten raw.


This begs the question of, Where are you located?

 

post #14 of 60

This isn't something that can be substituted really.

 

Pasteurization of eggs is not something that can be done at home, or substituted.

 

Order online and keep the powdered supplies on hand for future use. Or take the slight risk with eggs you have.

post #15 of 60
Thread Starter 

Macedonia. Where we don't have pasteurised eggs, powdered eggs, vanilla beans, pure vanilla extract, corn syrup and a long list of other stuff. :)

post #16 of 60

What Phatch said.  Or be sure that the eggs you can aquire are just coming from under the chicken.  Btw cooking them in the cake proper would lend to temperatures high enough to killing salmonella would it not?

post #17 of 60
Thread Starter 

They are a part of the filling that is added on the baked sponge. Of course baking at 200 degrees would kill it, salmonella is killed at 75 degrees Celsius.

 

It's okay what you say, but couldn't I simply cook the yolks, cool them and add to creamed butter?

post #18 of 60

I don't believe you can as they must be tempered first to prohibit scrambling or coagulation.

post #19 of 60
Thread Starter 

What about zabaione, when you do exactly that - cook the yolks?

post #20 of 60

Do you never have mayo? eek.gif

post #21 of 60

Venturing a guess I would say that the acidity of the wine may stop the coagulation process in the cooking of it.

post #22 of 60

Actually the best thing I know to do is if you want to take a chance on wasting a couple of eggs.  Give it a try!  :P

post #23 of 60
Thread Starter 

Well, you are right about that :) And how would I substitute the whites, I need to know how much "cream" comes out of 7 beaten whites...

 

FF, I personally don't eat it but there is regular pasteurised in the shops :)

post #24 of 60

You're probably going to have to look for powered egg whites or possibly a shelf stable substitute online.  The whites if I understand you correctly are to be beaten raw.

post #25 of 60

Does your Country have a problem with salmonella?  and are really fresh eggs not available?

 

post #26 of 60

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingTasty View Post
FF, I personally don't eat it but there is regular pasteurised in the shops :)

Hmmmmm, pasteurized mayo from the shops! Much, much better for your health than anything you could make yourself at home with fresh egg (oooooh the incredible risk of killing yourself).

 

Maybe in the future food preparation will be left to scientists in laboratories, you know, to reduce health risks. Let's hope so.

post #27 of 60

Guys, I think maybe we're over thinking this a little bit. The recipe is basically a meringue based butter cream.

 

I think we can use the same recipe, but use the Swiss butter cream method. 140 deg F should be enough to deal with the bugs. You'd have to leave out the egg yolks, so you'll lose the extra richness, but that is a  compromise you'll have to make.

 

To be really extra safe, you could do an Italian butter cream, but that would require alterations to the recipe and it's more technically challenging.

post #28 of 60

Two suggestions to achieve your goal ---

  

1)  Put the 7 egg yolks in a mixer and whip to fluffy.  Use regular sugar instead of powdered and cook it with a little water to 240 degree F.  Pour the hot sugar into the whipping yolks - this will heat the yolks enough to essentially cook them.  Whip until cooled to room temp, then add the softened butter a little at a time.  Do the same thing separately with your egg whites, then fold them together with the chopped nuts.

 

2) If you would rather do it in a double boiler, try this.  Use granulated sugar instead of powdered, and mix it with an equal amount of water.  Bring to a boil to dissolve sugar, then temper into egg yolks.  Whisk this together over simmering water as you would a sabayon.  It will become thick and lighten quite a bit and should reach about 180 F.  Take off the heat and add the butter in small amounts, folding in until incorporated.  For the whites - leave out the water and just whisk the whites and granulated sugar over simmering water until they reach 140F.  Fold together.

post #29 of 60
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot thetincook and Jellly, finally an answer. I am sure this would help me get the same results but without raw eggs in it.

post #30 of 60

Then either import it or don't make it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
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