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Trying New Foods

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

Yesterday, we had lunch at this great bakery/sandwich joint.  On Fridays they bake Chocolate Babka.  Neither my husband nor I had ever had this type of bread (that's not a big thing in Hawaii).  So we decided to try just a “baby babka” for breakfast this morning.  I gave it a quick heat up and slathered my piece in loads of sweet butter (hubby doesn’t care for any dairy). 

Man-o-man alive, what have we been missing?!

It’s a good thing they only make this on Friday. 

That was delicious. 

Now we need to find brioche.

post #2 of 28

I take it you're rather new to Arizona then?

post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 

... four years here in AZ

.... the rest was in Honolulu...

Hawaii 2009 011.jpg

 

post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
Now we need to find brioche.


Forget brioche. Find yourself a Filipino bakery and get some ensaymada. It's like brioche x100. The first one will blow your mind.Try the macapuno and ube versions too.

 

post #5 of 28

It's amazing how different parts of the U.S. have such diverse culinary offerings.  I live in NY and I wouldn't recognize a babka if it was sitting in front of me, though I'm pretty sure it's something I can find here.  You have inspired me to seek it out. 

 

I remember when I first moved to NY and discovered what a real bagel was all about.  It was an unforgettable experience, I still love those little evil round things. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 28

When I lived in NY over 25 years ago every Jewish Bakery made Babka.  The best Bagel Bakery was H&H uptown NY. And Pizza was best at any dirty Brooklyn place.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 28

"And Pizza was best at any dirty Brooklyn place. "" "'  """    

 

Hey! Watch it! My Family resembles that comment!lol.gif

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #8 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by thetincook

Find yourself a Filipino bakery and get some ensaymada. It's like brioche x100. The first one will blow your mind.Try the macapuno and ube versions too.

 



Oh yeah yeah, that took me awhile, I even had to "google" that (we've been away too long).

Those are very tasty.  I seem to recall this Asian Market that we found carries those.

 

What I have started in our household is to try new dishes and re-try foods.  

Maybe something we've never had or made a different way of the things that we don't care for. (we now enjoy brussel sprouts)

 

So, I asked the question:

What have you tried that was new for you?

 

 

post #9 of 28
Thread Starter 

... and heh, how about that photo above??

post #10 of 28

Too much salt in the water, and a touch to much magnesium!  XD

post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

It's amazing how different parts of the U.S. have such diverse culinary offerings.  I live in NY and I wouldn't recognize a babka if it was sitting in front of me, though I'm pretty sure it's something I can find here.  You have inspired me to seek it out. 

 

I remember when I first moved to NY and discovered what a real bagel was all about.  It was an unforgettable experience, I still love those little evil round things. 


 

I had an honest-to-goodness bagel in NEW YORK CITY years ago and it was FAB-U!! 

Notch with all the trappings, heavy on the cream cheese, no measly schemer for me, thank you.

 

And as for Babka, I also googled that and found many different images, and I assure, the one here was not pictured. 

I guess different foods in different parts of the country are made differently,

and as my girl MARTHA says, “that’s a good thing”. 

 


 

 

post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Longcolts View Post

Too much salt in the water, and a touch to much magnesium!  XD



you know salt water is great for your skin!

 

post #13 of 28

I moved to Seattle about a year ago now and I tried Indian food for the first time and I LOVED it. I also had very traditional Thai food in our international district and that was an amazement for the taste buds. I love to try new things, unfortunately with my salary as a line cook here, I am not able to adventure out as much as I could in Phoenix. I make a very good wage for what I have heard here for my experience also. I do not know how you all do it personally, however I do live in a very nice part of town. Good thing I have a suga-momma! lol.gif

 

All in good time I suppose. 

post #14 of 28
Thread Starter 

Man RGM2, I wish we were in the greater Phoenix area!!  I miss going out to eat sssoooooo much. Maybe some goof take out food!!  Where we are now, ugh!! 

I make three squares a day.  You should see my recipe "binder" of recipes that I've collected from other people so that I can cook our favs. 

Food, or maybe I should say eating here is just a necessity, surely nothing "fancy". 

We're planning a cocktail party with "heavy pupus" instead of a sit down dinner (not enough room for one thing)

and I was thinking of making things that we would have at any home you would go to in Hawaii.

Alas, that's a little too adventurous for the folks 'round these parts.

post #15 of 28
Thread Starter 

REALLY do not care for chicken breast (too dry), but gave it a nother go tonight on the grill.

They came out ok, not over done and spiced nicely.

post #16 of 28

Try brining them.

post #17 of 28

Most people overcook chicken breast one way or another. If you pound them a little first so that the breast is even in shape , it will cook evenly. Most are to well on ends and outer perimeter and not cooked enough in center. Make sure you start cooking them at room  temp NOT out of fridge., as this will take the heat longer to penetrate and hasten over cooking on outside . Marinades will help the flavor and slightly tenderize them in some cases, but the real trick is do not overcook.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #18 of 28

And forget the USDA temperature recommendations. 180F=shoe leather.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

REALLY do not care for chicken breast (too dry), but gave it a nother go tonight on the grill.

They came out ok, not over done and spiced nicely.



KG, I developed my own procedure on both chickenbreast and porkloin. Both are notorious easy to overcook and dry out. I never use a grill on these, it's always overcooked.

 

How I cook my chickenbreasts but keep them still moist?

- Flavor them first; dry them with paper kitchentowel, cut some fresh tarragonleaves and sprinkle over the meat. Use whatever herb(s) you like, but tarragon and chicken are a perfect match. Cut a clove of garlic in slices and sprinkle over. Some good turns of the black pepper mill (don't use the finest position). NO salt!! Pour a little sunflower oil over the meat, rub and and let all those flavors get transmitted by the oil into the meat for 15 minutes or longer. Time doesn't matter. If you do a longer marinating, put this preparation in a plasticbag in your fridge.

- Use a non-stick pan and bring it to a normal high heat. Add no more than a few drops of sunflower oil. Take the slices of garlic from the chicken but leave the rest on it, especially the oil. Put the meat in the pan with a small tbsp of marinating oil and DO NOT move the meat around, simply don't touch it. Turn after a good minute and leave again to get a nice crust.

- Reduce the fire to a normal low (let's say 20% of the available power) and cover the pan with a large sheet of aluminiumfoil. It does not need to be sealed entirely!! Cook this way for another 10-15 minutes. Push your indexfinger on the meat regurlarly. When it gets somewhat ferm, it's done.

- Take the aluminiumfoil and roll the chickenbreast in them for the time to make a sauce... =5 minutes at least! Your chicken will be perfect.

- Want the quickest sauce? Sweat a chopped shallot in the same pan. Deglaze your pan with a dash of white wine and maybe half a cup of chickenstock and let reduce a few minutes on high fire. If you don't have chickenstock at hand, use water instead with a tbsp of light soy sauce and/or break a small corner from a Knorr chicken bouillon cube and put it in. Add half a cup of cream and reduce. Taste for s&p. Maybe some extra tarragon in it or chives or parcely or... whatever you like. Also try spices like a pinch of ras al hanut or garam masala (delicious on porkloin!)...

 

As I said, I use the same procedure for porkloin when cooking it on the stovetop. I use fresh or dried sage on it instead of tarragon.

 

post #20 of 28
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thetincook View Post

Try brining them.



'ya know thetincook, alot of the chicken in the mega super markets today (i.e. frozen Tyson) are already brined. 

I didn't know that until I was watching a cooking program on TV and it was suggested that you read

the bag and it's ingredients.  Sure enough, "salt solution".

Granted, I could buy fresh chicken, but we don't live close to anything,

so I have a nice chest freezer that I stock about every 2 months or so.

 

post #21 of 28

They don't do this for us or for taste. They do this for pure greed and profit. Its either pumped in (Butterball) or if frozen glazed . It adds to the weight.  At $2.99 a pound they are selling you saltwater, anywhere from 5 to 18%. Another corporate rip off.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #22 of 28

KY. 

 Today was a lazy sought of day for me and I watched TV and saw a food show about famous sandwiches of the world.  They had the Chef and GM of The Brown Hotel on and they were  explaining orgin  of the Hot Brown Sandwich.  

    He started with the traditional butter flour roux. Then added 3/4 milk  1/4 heavy cream. S & P to taste. Then Fresh Grated Parmesan Cheese only. They used and said have always used Roast Turkey Breast  placed on bread in a skillet, then poured the sauce, sprinkled more cheese  then into med. oven till slightly brown. Take out 2 wedges of Tomato 1 each side.    Thats out of the 2 horses mouths  ???

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #23 of 28

Doesn't surprise me, Ed. I remember one of Bobby Flay's Throwdowns, which was a Hot Browns challange done at The Brown, against the executive chef and, if I recollect correctly, his sous.

 

They, too, made a version that was not quite the same as the original.

 

It's kind of crazy, because this is a fully documented dish, with precise records of when and how things were done. Check the history and you'll find:

 

1. They are correct about the cheese. It was done, originally, just with parmesan.

2. They are incorrect about "always turkey." The dish started life using poached chicken, and later evolved to turkey.

3. They are incorrect as to the use of tomato as a garnish. The original used mushrooms.

4. The original was also garnished with bacon, and I've never had any version (even some gross ones using country ham & turkey swimming in an orange cheddar sauce) that didn't include it. Did they not mention that?

5. The bread isn't just dropped in. It's arranged in a precise manner. Did they mention that? The guys who fought Flay at least knew about that, and made a point of it with their version.

6. I've eaten, literally, hundreds of Hot Browns, made all sorts of ways. Not once was I served one made in a skillet. Not saying it couldn't have been done that way. But the arrangement of the bread almost dictates an oval baking dish, and not many restaurants stock skillets in that shape.

 

What I suspect is that, even at The Brown, somebody along the way modified the recipe. He passed that down to his successor, and so on. The guys working the kitchen today, therefore, make the version that was handed to them, but have never checked the records to see if it differs from the original.

 

That recipes evolve, and change, and are put a personal spin on by chefs is a regular part of our industry. Normally it doesn't bother me. But when an iconic (yes, I hate that buzzword---but, in this case I'm using it precisely) is presented at its point of origin I feel they should get it right. At The Brown I would expect a correctly made Hot Brown, just as I would expect a correctly made Waldorf Salad at the WA.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #24 of 28

Well actually the WH.crazy.gif Interned cold table 40 yrs. ago.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #25 of 28

When I served my apprenticeship  (  over 43 years ago), one of the hotels they sent me to was the Waldorf for about 8 weeks. They did serve the trditional Waldorf salad there. They insisted on green apples mixed with red delicious.. The same guys made it all the time, all the mis en plac was sent from the vegetable room where 10 or 12 older woman  all dressed in white with hairnets sitting at a long table. peeled and prepped everything.

     The new chef was Eugene Scanlon who was the first American to ever hold Ex. position. Self taught  in French language he came from doing a stint at the Fountainbleu in Miami where he was Ex. Sous. He later went on to become Corp Ex Chef and F&B manager for Hilton International . Great guy.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #26 of 28

WA=Waldorf Astoria---which, I guess, is really showing my age.

 

What is WH, Panini?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #27 of 28

I'm screwing with ya. It was actually the Waldorf Hotel. They later named it Astoria. I could be way off though.. Can't really remember what I had for B'fast. LOL Chemo Brain.

Ed is exactly right. Ed do you recall Beatrice?

I shadowed Chef Santi. Chewed me out almost every day.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #28 of 28

The original Waldorf was at 34th street, near where Empire State Building is now. It later moved to 50th Street and Park.  Astoria was named after John Jacob ASTOR the millionaire who at one time financed it. Cant recall Beatrice, but remember Claude Phillipe who was Ex Chef  before Scanlon and who used to visit the place after Gene took over as Ex. Chef. He would sit in Chefs office and have GLASSES of wine and had trouble walking out.  Do you remember an Afro American Chef named Roosevelt who made all the Ice Creams and frozen desserts from scratch ??  I then went to old Manhatten Hotel Marce Hanzler was chef  and A Jewish Guy named Herb Barrith who I learned a lot from . Herb won the medal of French Government for Garde Manger and Decorateur work and one both  Competitions  at the Nat. Hotel Show at the old Couliseum 2 years in a row , when he was at the Manhattan and the New Americana Hotels.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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