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i need help with a report on the 5 mother sauces. - Page 2

post #31 of 64

The President says the economy is getting back on track. How's that working for ya?

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post #32 of 64

knorr

mccormick

hidden valley ranch

minor's

lipton

 

That's American though, not sure about mother sauces in other countries.

post #33 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

I'm just sitting back laughing at you guys. Poor technique? who judges that.

Cosa Nostra..Really...Really

The only thing this thread has proved to me is that you guys have been corrupted by the WWW.

You guys have become so friggin anal!!!

 

If you look hard enough you will find something that makes you happy.

Do you realize you're trying to tell this old chef that mayo and vinegarette are mother sauces.

Then you want me to be open minded.

This whole board has become one big pissing match on who can look something up.

Pull the plug on google, get a beer, and we can start to talk about cooking.

We didn't have the WWW We waited for the next Thuries magazine to come out. Yea, look that one up!

The only foam he knew was on a cold one.

OK, return to normalcrazy.gif



If I taste something that is s**t, I assume a big part of that is due to poor technique, regardless of whether you are old-school or embrace new techniques. The techniques which a chef chooses to use aren't of prime concern here, what is important is that they implement them soundly. Now I know what you mean is that the "correct" technique is highly subjective, we have all worked for different chefs who each use "the best way" of doing something but I'm equally sure if we sit down to a dish that has any selected techniques implemented badly we can spot them a mile away.

 

Personally I have taught all the guys in my kitchens the classical way of doing a particular task and the more modern way. This way, they have a sound understanding of multiple ways of doing something and that what technique you choose depends on the desired result you are looking for. Also It means that they can walk in to any kitchen able to do a top job regardless of the equipment that kitchen will have. I have had young guys coming for trials from Michelin backgrounds who have been brought up on water baths, planchas, thermomix's etc who don't know how to cook anything without these tools. When you ask someone to cook you a piece of meat without a water bath or a creme anglaise without a thermo and they look at you like you're from Mars and these people are coming for a CDP or Sous chef position you become under no illusion as to the importance of a training in classical technique. For me, I don't let anyone use a waterbath or thermo or pacojet or hydrocolloids etc until they can prove they can do the job without one.

 

I remember vividly while doing a bit of Temp work, I was in a very famous kitchen, every award under the sun. Fully booked, half an hour into service, the water baths go down. They had a very young brigade, it was the sous chef's night off and the only people in the kitchen that knew how to cook without one were myself (who was on pastry that night) and the head chef. Instead of jumping on that section himself, the HC decides it's a better idea to talk the kid on sauce through everything. You can imagine how that went. By the end of service the poor guy on sauce had been in tears most of the night, completely stripped of any confidence, the food leaving his section was completely abysmal and it turned out an inspector was on the receiving end of some of this disaster. The HC solution? Did he realise the importance of teaching his brigade fundamental cooking techniques? Did he f**k. He bought another 3 water baths the next day "just in case" 1 or 2 went down. Oh dear. This was the wake up call for me of the importance of training your team properly.

 

I never said anything about what sauces were or were not "mother" or "basic" or whatever. Frankly, I don't really care. Call Mayo a basic sauce of you want to, as long as you can make it well, who cares? As for looking things up on the net. If there is anyone on this forum who has not used a recipe from the net with terrible results and from then on not vowed to take everything on the net with a bucket of salt, well there is no help for them. But it is a great way for chefs to share knowledge with each other and you would be foolish to turn down such an opportunity.

 

There is nothing wrong with being "anal" about stuff that is important, in fact I encourage it. What is or is not a mother sauce, however, isn't one of them.

 

Sorry for rambling on but the training of people coming into the industry is a subject I am very passionate or "anal" about.

 

A cold beer always sounds good. smile.gif

 

.......................and breathe.

 

post #34 of 64

.......breathe, oh I'm sorry chef were you saying something. Well I guess I didn't realize just how anal you are.

I have to tell you, I've herd what you are saying 3, maybe 400 times. Well I'm not going to"insert career here" as most

on the boards do.

   You have a nice way of trying to paint a picture of my career. You don't have a clue how I feel about training. Here in the states

we have let this industry implode.

The last half of your post backs everything I was trying to express.  I scan new posts and if I see something that I may be able to help someone with

I will respond. I respond because I have the blisters and the scars from making mistakes. Inevitably someone will google something

and pop on with it. There is so much misinformation on the www it's criminal. Almost all of it has an agenda. These young chefs

do believe most of what they read.

Somehow you got that I care what to call a sauce or what. Wrongo bongo. I came to ChefTalk 10 years ago. There was always intelligent

banter about cooking. Now it has become www references. If you don't believe that then oh well. I have always thought that we should be

required to post a bio to be in the professional forum. Real or not who cares. It's just getting old reading copy and pastes.

  Now I don't understand too much what you do with all that fancy equipment and brigades and such. I did it for a while and quickly figured

out it was not for me financially. I still respect it though as I do someone working at Ronanld Mcdonalds. If you read into that

that the money is important, YES!!! IT IS! You might say I'm anal about it.

Now let's talk about you name:>D

Do you know what a Shiner is?

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post #35 of 64

Panini And Kuan  ! 

          AMEN  You guys said it all..  Us old guys are talking classical cuisine and terms and definititions, Not the Cutesy Lemongrass confitt and  Pork Jowls Vol Au Vent that someone dreams up to put on menues  today..Some of the things that are put on are simply put there because you can't really compare them to the other guys to see just how good or bad they are. 

            Learn the basics first then be creative with the rest, but please don't tell me vinaigrette is a mother sauce or a variation of one.. Sorry  because I can only shake my head at your school and your instructors, and yes that is my opinion.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #36 of 64

Cosa Nostra,

  You know partly I jest. I guess I was feeling a little old.

I'm still very confused. Now this is coming from an old hippie. This attitude of non confrontation is something I'm not familiar with.

OK, an educator gets up in front of a class and tells you he is enjoying the rain.  You look over and see a dog peeing on his leg.

You best believe I'm going to confront him or her on that. That's basically what my secondary education was based on. My son is in college

and I would never tell him to conform to something he knows is wrong.

Is that what happened?

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post #37 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

.......breathe, oh I'm sorry chef were you saying something. Well I guess I didn't realize just how anal you are.

I have to tell you, I've herd what you are saying 3, maybe 400 times. Well I'm not going to"insert career here" as most

on the boards do.

   You have a nice way of trying to paint a picture of my career. You don't have a clue how I feel about training. Here in the states

we have let this industry implode.

The last half of your post backs everything I was trying to express.  I scan new posts and if I see something that I may be able to help someone with

I will respond. I respond because I have the blisters and the scars from making mistakes. Inevitably someone will google something

and pop on with it. There is so much misinformation on the www it's criminal. Almost all of it has an agenda. These young chefs

do believe most of what they read.

Somehow you got that I care what to call a sauce or what. Wrongo bongo. I came to ChefTalk 10 years ago. There was always intelligent

banter about cooking. Now it has become www references. If you don't believe that then oh well. I have always thought that we should be

required to post a bio to be in the professional forum. Real or not who cares. It's just getting old reading copy and pastes.

  Now I don't understand too much what you do with all that fancy equipment and brigades and such. I did it for a while and quickly figured

out it was not for me financially. I still respect it though as I do someone working at Ronanld Mcdonalds. If you read into that

that the money is important, YES!!! IT IS! You might say I'm anal about it.

Now let's talk about you name:>D

Do you know what a Shiner is?


Panini

 

You seem to be taking a lot of things I'm saying as if they are a personal attack on you. If you feel this way I apologise. It was not my intention. I have made no assumptions about you or your career. Any assumption I would have made would have been in your favour judging by your willingness to offer advice. I wouldn't trust anything I found on the net and assumed most other chefs were of the same opinion, perhaps I am wrong on this. When I refer to "old-school" I don't mean that in a derogatory way it's just my way of saying classical. When I say "dinosaur" I mean in mentality rather than in age. You can be a young old-school chef and a young dinosaur, just like you can be an older new-school chef or an older innovator.

 

I haven't spent much time on this forum as I usually post on a UK one so I will trust you know more of its intricacies than I. If I didn't think I had anything to add about a topic I wouldn't post on it, simple. If someone disagrees with me, great, maybe I've been doing something wrong all these years and am about to learn something, maybe not.

 

The reason why I mentioned my experiences was because I felt they painted a picture of an industry based on short cuts and of chefs who have been trained properly by their Head chefs but are not passing on that knowledge when they become Head chefs. The attitude I see so often now is "I don't need to train my chefs how to cook because I have a water bath, I don't need to teach someone how to make an anglaise or hollandaise etc because the thermomix will do that, I don't need to teach my chefs how to butcher meat or prep fish because my suppliers will do that and so on and so on.

 

Of course money is important, to be a good chef you have to be a good businessman, you can't have one with out the other. I have just taken up a new position, completely different to anything I have done before because I was fed up of fine dining and totally burned out. I've just spent the last year travelling and generally bumming about due to this so I have a lot of respect for guys who have been in this industry a long time. The first person I call with any questions I still have about cheffing, or life for that matter, is my first Head chef so I in no way mean to belittle experience. The truth is there are very few experienced chefs in this industry any more. I don't know what happens to chefs after the age of 40 but they all seem to disappear. I'm 29 and feel 129 after some services so anyone still in the trenches later on in life has my respect.

 

One of the best chefs I ever trained came to me from Mcdonalds. He could work quickly, cleanly and efficiently, pretty soon after I hired him, I couldn't say that about too many of the kids I get with their fancy culinary diploma's and self important attitudes. I can never be bothered filling out my Bio's on these things but if you're that interested PM me and I'll send you my CV and references.

 

My name real name is Dom, my username is because I'm part Italian and everyone at school thought I must therefore be in the mafia. It kind of stuck after that. 

 

A shiner? Is it a black eye?

 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

Cosa Nostra,

  You know partly I jest. I guess I was feeling a little old.

I'm still very confused. Now this is coming from an old hippie. This attitude of non confrontation is something I'm not familiar with.

OK, an educator gets up in front of a class and tells you he is enjoying the rain.  You look over and see a dog peeing on his leg.

You best believe I'm going to confront him or her on that. That's basically what my secondary education was based on. My son is in college

and I would never tell him to conform to something he knows is wrong.

Is that what happened?



Trust me, after a Saturday service I'll feel older than you. I'm not sure what you mean here. If you're talking about my experience of college then everything I got taught at college, my head chef would immediately tell me that it was a load of rubbish. If I went in the next day and told my lecturer what my HC said, it wouldn't go down to well. If I used techniques I was taught at work, I was marked down for them, If I wrote in an exam the way I would do something at work I was marked down for this etc etc. I learned just to have the attitude of "when in Rome" by the end of the course and was glad when it had finished so my real education could begin.

 

I teach my chefs to question all their pre-conceived ideas about food and if they can show me a better way of doing something I'll always listen. Although usually I am right all along. smile.gif

 

I have walked into many kitchen on trials, interviews etc that have been run appallingly. If I didn't like the way it was run I wouldn't tell the chef I thought he was s**t, I'd just leave.

post #38 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosanostra View Post

I teach my chefs to question all their pre-conceived ideas about food and if they can show me a better way of doing something I'll always listen. Although usually I am right all along. smile.gif

I teach my COOKS, so that they have a reasonable chance to gain the experience and knowledge that might qualify them to earn the title of CHEF (Chef=Chief=Manager of section, station, kitchen)


 

 

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post #39 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Panini And Kuan  ! 

          AMEN  You guys said it all..  Us old guys are talking classical cuisine and terms and definititions, Not the Cutesy Lemongrass confitt and  Pork Jowls Vol Au Vent that someone dreams up to put on menues  today..Some of the things that are put on are simply put there because you can't really compare them to the other guys to see just how good or bad they are. 

            Learn the basics first then be creative with the rest, but please don't tell me vinaigrette is a mother sauce or a variation of one.. Sorry  because I can only shake my head at your school and your instructors, and yes that is my opinion.



Very true. The problem is that these guys you speak of have usually skipped a classical training and gone straight into composing dishes without any understanding of what makes a classical dish a classic. Why has this dish stood the test of time when others have not? what can I learn from these dishes to help me create my own? Just like Picasso learned to draw before he started doing all his whacky stuff a great chef must learn the classics before he can create classics of his own.

 

I don't think these chefs do it out of fear but usually out of a need to feel different from other classical chefs and to give them an ego boost. In my first Head chef job I did some real howlers, all out of an obsession to innovate and be original and different. In short I had a "look at me and what I can do attitutde".

 

Poached and grilled duck breast with foie gras ice cream and orange air and snow with a garnish of duck confit lasagne made with warm orange jelly, baby spinach and chestnut puree topped off with an earl grey dougnut filled with duck confit and chestnut puree and a bit of five spice duck sauce to finish it all!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Yes, not one of my proudest moments. Now a days I have the confidence to let the ingredients do the talking and believe food should be made to please rather than impress. But we all have to get a certain amount of s**t out of our systems. 

post #40 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post



I teach my COOKS, so that they have a reasonable chance to gain the experience and knowledge that might qualify them to earn the title of CHEF (Chef=Chief=Manager of section, station, kitchen)


 

 

Ok,ok. In the UK we have Commis chef, Demi Chef, Chef de Partie, Snr Chef De partie, Jnr Sous Chef, Sous Chef, Head Chef. I'm sure I probably missed out a few there. A cook over here is seen as an unskilled position so no one likes calling themselves that. At the end of the day though we are all just cooks, so sorry if my jargon offends you.
 

 

post #41 of 64

True what can I learn from these dishes as you stated. But lets stop and learn those dishes first. 

Today it's all ego trips .Is it impossible for a person to say" I am an average guy, in an average world, doing an average thing.? 

     I had a girl from The CIA on an extership program, after a busy night I asked her to grab a broom and give US (I clean to as does the Sous) a hand cleaning up as everyone was shot and wanted to go home. She said to me "I go to the Culinary Institute and I pay to learn,  not to sweep"  Needless to say the following season we terminated our extern program. Years ago we peeled tons of potatoes and onions, today they come peeled cleaned and chopped or cut.. I remember the first time I saw shrimp come already breaded, we thought God sent it., but if we did not get it in we knew how to do it because we learned everything from scratch. Thank God

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #42 of 64

Cosa Nostra,

No. I take very few things personal. I guess I had you lumped with us guys and not those guys.  I do get a little frustrated trying to figure out who I'm talking to, or actually if it's

worth my time. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy some of these kids making asses out of themselves. I will sometimes edge them on. I don't take too much here seriously. I've grown to hate

the word passion. This thinkng that I'll work cheap because I'm passionate about what I do is rediculous. It's stupid. This type of thinking has held back our industry for years.

   For the last dozen years I have been involved in a completely unconventional place. No titles, no schedules,no job descriptions. Some have been with me for over 25 yrs. We share

profits. Everyone has put their children through private school and are now in college. Everyone has a piece of it for retirement. We do everything a corporate executive will tell you

will close a business. I certainly don't need to have my ego boosted.

Well Cosanostra, nice to meet you.

Jeff

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post #43 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

True what can I learn from these dishes as you stated. But lets stop and learn those dishes first. 

Today it's all ego trips .Is it impossible for a person to say" I am an average guy, in an average world, doing an average thing.? 

     I had a girl from The CIA on an extership program, after a busy night I asked her to grab a broom and give US (I clean to as does the Sous) a hand cleaning up as everyone was shot and wanted to go home. She said to me "I go to the Culinary Institute and I pay to learn,  not to sweep"  Needless to say the following season we terminated our extern program. Years ago we peeled tons of potatoes and onions, today they come peeled cleaned and chopped or cut.. I remember the first time I saw shrimp come already breaded, we thought God sent it., but if we did not get it in we knew how to do it because we learned everything from scratch. Thank God


Agreed, I always help get cleaned down with the rest of the guys, if the KP's getting pounded and I'm free I'll help with the dishes. A lot of Kids these day think cooking is glamorous. There is NOTHING glamorous about cooking for a living. These types never last long though. Out of my college class of 30, 3 of us are still chefs. To be honest I find it really difficult to buy anything in. I was brought up to think that it was a cop out to do this and In my first HC job I made all my guys work 16/17 hour days for a pittance just so that we could say everything was made in house and so I can inflate my ego buy winning awards and banging out all this "original" intricate food. During this time I lost touch with all my friends out with the industry, split up with my long term girlfriend, hardly saw my family. In the end you take a look in the mirror at 2am and think "is it all worth it". That's when I handed in my notice and took off. 

 

Since then I see things pretty differently but still feel guilty now and again if I buy in some bread instead of making it or buy my fish already filleted. I guess like a catholic schoolgirl you're always left feeling guilty even if you do nothing wrong. smile.gif

 

post #44 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

Cosa Nostra,

No. I take very few things personal. I guess I had you lumped with us guys and not those guys.  I do get a little frustrated trying to figure out who I'm talking to, or actually if it's

worth my time. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy some of these kids making asses out of themselves. I will sometimes edge them on. I don't take too much here seriously. I've grown to hate

the word passion. This thinkng that I'll work cheap because I'm passionate about what I do is rediculous. It's stupid. This type of thinking has held back our industry for years.

   For the last dozen years I have been involved in a completely unconventional place. No titles, no schedules,no job descriptions. Some have been with me for over 25 yrs. We share

profits. Everyone has put their children through private school and are now in college. Everyone has a piece of it for retirement. We do everything a corporate executive will tell you

will close a business. I certainly don't need to have my ego boosted.

Well Cosanostra, nice to meet you.

Jeff


Jeff, we're a lot closer in outlook than you think. Yeah my first job I was working an 80 hour week for £10,000 a year, about $16,000. So what's that $3.85 ish an hour. At the time I loved it, looked forward to going into work every day, was learning something new all the time but now after 7 years of these hours it just breaks you down. My first priority is to the owners to run a profitable business the second to my staff and third to my customers. I know the customer is meant to be king and all that, but I haven't changed that much. 

 

To be honest I usually only use the word passion to try and excuse myself when I am being an Ahole. Strange thing is I treated all my chefs (sorry cooks, to keep Pete happy) pretty harshly but every single one of them has asked me for a job at my new place. Strange. To make Pete even more angry I've always got the guys to call me Dom and not Chef. Horror of Horrors!

 

post #45 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosanostra View Post... To make Pete even more angry I've always got the guys to call me Dom and not Chef. Horror of Horrors!

Nooo, doesn't make me "angry", or even upset. crazy.gif that's the boss's prerogative.

 

Now that I have been informed by "cosanostra" of his location and customary practices for kitchen titles, the matter becomes moot.

 

I DO take issue with U.S. culinary schools inferring that 9 months to two years of their "training" qualifies one for the title of chef.

 


 

 

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post #46 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post



Nooo, doesn't make me "angry", or even upset. crazy.gif that's the boss's prerogative.

 

Now that I have been informed by "cosanostra" of his location and customary practices for kitchen titles, the matter becomes moot.

 

I DO take issue with U.S. culinary schools inferring that 9 months to two years of their "training" qualifies one for the title of chef.

 


 

 


I jest. The graduates of these schools have to think they are getting something for their money though or who would pay the inflated fee's? If you want to be a Chef, go work for a Chef. People would be better doing apprenticeships working their way around the sections and learning on the job rather than in a school setting. I remember I had an applicant for a sous position once who had just finished culinary school. I got them in for a trial just to take the p**s and so the guys in the kitchen could have a laugh, a bit cruel but really, applying for a sous job straight out of school, seriously? I'm starting to repeat myself so I will only say it once more and leave it for the kids themselves to decide.

 

Culinary School is a complete waste of time and money! 

 

post #47 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by cosanostra View Post

Culinary School is a complete waste of time and money! 

For the student! laser.gif
 

 

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post #48 of 64


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post



For the student! laser.gif
 

 


biggrin.gif Indeed.

 

post #49 of 64

Ok, I have something to confess, I visited one of the Culinary schools in my area. It was one of the expensive ones.

They have been sort of courting me for a while. The first impression I got was that this was a paper mill. I was shocked at

the amount of career changers. The syllibus was quasi classical. puff, danish and a few products made with that. I audited

a Spanish Cuisine class. Saw some  very basic Tex-Mex being made.

Where are these people going to go? There seemed to be no sence of ergency.

  Most instructors were part time. It did not look as though they were active outside school.

Wifey thought it would be good to slow down. I am 1/2 way through writing a cookbook and getting ready

to risk the farm again to open a wholesale kitchen. I don't know, anybody here want to open a kitchen?

jeff

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post #50 of 64

Who comes up with the syllabus in these places?

 

The thing I don't get is why they try to teach a little bit of everything and don't just concentrate on techniques that the student will use on a daily basis, this will make them much more employable. If I have to teach someone from a culinary school how to do everything as if I just picked them up off the street, then what is the value in their education? If you try to be all things to all people you end up being nothing to none

 

I know some of you will think, here we go, he's rambling on about technique again. But bare with me. If you take a look at the cuisines of the world, the basic techniques used in all of them aren't very different. How to make stock, how to prep meat, fish, fruit and vegetables, how to make dough's, how to braise, saute, bake, grill, fry, poach etc. How to make sauces, emulsions, consomes, soups etc The style of food isn't important at this stage.

 

And colleges/schools of all places should be teaching students that there is always another way of doing something. If I went into a college and told the lecturers I make my stocks in a pressure cooker now, they'd faint, or that I make a consomme in a centrifuge or by freezing and drip feeding through muslin, they'll look at you like you're an alien.

 

When I was at college my main lecturer worked part time in one of the biggest s**tholes in that city. What sort of a role model is that? I was actually asked to do one morning a week at the local college in my city. I was kind of split on it because I've not been a head chef very long and am still learning how to do it myself and so would feel a bit weird lecturing a class about how to become one. However, at the same time when I go into these places and the first thing I see is the stock pot being used as a dustbin, with students throwing all kinds of s**t in there It put me right off. If they can't even teach students to have a bit of respect for their stocks what hope is there? If I started teaching in a place like that I'd rub so many people up the wrong way but if people who actually care about these students and training them, rather than seeing them as a pay cheque,  are put off then how can these places improve?

 

If you can stomach it, Jeff I'd do it. It would be good for the student's to have a dissenting voice in there and getting taught by someone who is still doing it. 

post #51 of 64

Keep this in mind . Private culinary schools are there to make a PROFIT, that is # 1 aim. I taught in 3,. 2 were public  1 private. The private one told the culinary instructors" spend a lot of time on knife skills and potato prep as it is inexpensive or cost nothing""

       The last 2 classes were spent on seafood(why only 2? because it was expensive) 

     The term Chef is aquired over time, knowlege , patience, and persistance. These schools tell you refer to each other as chef ?? They place as Santa Claus does, visions of sugar plums in the students heads. Schools are basic and thats it and some do a poor job of even that.     Students are third or fourth concern, profit is first, self is second and vacations and pensions next. Let all these students face reality. I don't care what school you enroll in, you will only get out of them what you put in. It is not the school , it is you.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #52 of 64

There was a lot of mention about the American Culinary Federation and The Texas Chefs Association. I have broken

my ties with both groups.

It was strange. Like a liberal arts program within a tecnical degree.

No, I'm done mentoring. My last one left me three years ago and is now the Exec. Pastry Chef at one of the nicer hotels in the

city. I certainly don't think they want me running around speaking the truth about the industry.lol.gif

It's all about the student loans and grants.

 

   One of the biggest reasons for wanting to build a new kitchen is to incorporate the apprentice program

from the local community college. It's a great time to build something

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

Reply
post #53 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by matrix42013 View Posthave set up an appointment to talk to the chef at Le Coq au Vin tomorrow.



So how did it go?

post #54 of 64

He made an ill fated question about sauce ketchup and the kitchen is now running a special of pate de trou du cul en crout.

post #55 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by thetincook View Post

pate de trou du cul en crout.


A classic. And one of the 5 father patés (according to Es-cul-fier). 

 

post #56 of 64


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by thetincook View Post

He made an ill fated question about sauce ketchup and the kitchen is now running a special of pate de trou du cul en crout.



Hah hah!  lol.gif

post #57 of 64
Thread Starter 

just thought I'd give an update about my sauce report. i got an A. after reading a lot of your comments i realized i was miss-informed about a couple things i said earlier. the mother sauces i was to report on are:

 

Veloute

espagnole

hollandaise

vinaigrette

tomato

 

mayonnaise is not one of the 5 mother sauces but is refered to as the mother of cold emulsification.

 

anyways, thank you all for your comments and insight into this matter. if i have any more reports or questions i will definitely be posting them here. :)

 

a little side note about my school. i am attending Le cordon blu culinary school. it is a 9 month course and i have just finished my first set of classes. i had safety and sanitation and passed my safe-serve test. and also had culinary foundations 1 which i also passed. in foundations 1 we learned the history of french food, basic knife skills, basic sauces and soups, a couple dishes were demonstrated for us, though we didn't make anything but mayo in the class we will be doing actual cooking in foundations 2. my teacher is a certified master chef and a great teacher. it's a hard curriculum to do when you have safety AND foundations at the same time cause you only have 6 weeks to do it but i passed with a 92 in foundations and an 82 in safety. i just cant wait to get my hands on some real cooking. thanks again for everything guys. you truly are a fountain of knowledge.

post #58 of 64

hey matrix whats up my name is andrew salter i and i also attend le cordon bleu and have the same essay as you. Maybe we can link up and you can help me? i have chef klaus 1115

post #59 of 64

I'm happy for you Matrix. I'm glad you did well.    Good luck to you too, Salter.

 

OK. Now I'm just gonna say this, because I really feel in a "speak your thoughts" state of mind. I hope nobody gets all out of shape, even though I know that's a mistake. I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin' ... what I'm thinking. I don't now, or have I ever in the past, had any interest in the history of French food. That's just me. Yes, I can cook it, and very well at that, when called on. In all my years of putting good food on plates it's never been any burden to me not knowing this said history. As a matter of fact, the most famous classic French dish that I've put out is made by/with a recipe that I've modified/tweaked the ever-loving out of from it's, as far as I know, originality. I know it doesn't suck because I've gotten very nice compliments from even French people that have enjoyed it. Anyway, all that noise is just my opinionated thoughts. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #60 of 64

vinegerett is not a mother sauce # 5 is tomatoe

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