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Interesting Take on Alfredo

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I asked my friend Paul Goldfield who lives in Rome ( http://paulgoldfield.wordpress.com/author/paulgoldfield/ ) about Alfredo.  So he asked some of the cooks around him and he sends me this one interpretation:

 

Grated Parmaggiano, grated Fontina, and a very small amount of Gorgonzola dolce.

 

The cheeses are melted separately then combined.

 

Then add cream (or butter)

 

Add a small amount of pasta water to combine the cream and cheeses together.

 

And here I thought I was going to put an end to the debate!  :D :D

post #2 of 11

Forgive me but isn't Alfredo sauce an american invention?  Is that the debate you speak of?

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 11

No it's Italian. Those guidos will probably give Catherine Di Medici the credit or some dive this chick ate at.

The American version is different then theirs. I assume the american is made like a cheese sauce so it can sit for a bit in the window. The Italian is basically garnished with mixed cheeses. I can remember always drinking Sambucca or something like that to break the cheeses down. Like Fondue. Capish?

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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #4 of 11

Supposidly it was invented at Alfreddo's Restaurant in Rome. I . wasn't their then so I can't attest to it.   The American version is simply a take off on a Mornay Sauce.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was surprised at the Gorgonzola dolce.  I can see Fontina but Gorgonzola?  Guess I'll just have to try it.  I think what this means is that even in Italy there's a wide range of interpretations regarding Alfredo.

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

The cheeses are melted separately then combined.


Kuan, thanks for the information. How do you go about melting those cheeses? Three saucepans, put grated cheese on low heat until melted, then combine? 

 

What difference do you think it would make compared to, say, melt the butter in a single saucepan and add all three grated cheeses directly in the warm butter until melted? 

 

 

 

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post




Kuan, thanks for the information. How do you go about melting those cheeses? Three saucepans, put grated cheese on low heat until melted, then combine? 

 

What difference do you think it would make compared to, say, melt the butter in a single saucepan and add all three grated cheeses directly in the warm butter until melted? 

 

 

 


Good question.  I will have to ask.  I think it might mean added one at a time to the cream and then pasta water added to the cream and then all of that is tossed together with the pasta?

 

Sometimes stuff is lost in translation.

post #8 of 11

Ha that would make sense - if you do ask please let us know! Thanks. 

post #9 of 11

I believe that if cheeses were added to just butter and melted , butter with its low smoke point would brown before cheese melt. I cheeses are added to hot pasta,  pasta water .butter. and or cream. they will melt without browning, just by pastas heat holding capabilities.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

Ah he says bain marie.

post #11 of 11

Says 3 saucepans? Nothing about Bain Marie or double boiler.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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