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What is a starter? - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:

Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

 

1. Soup.

2. Salad (possibly)

3. Everything else (main dishes, side dishes, maybe salad, bread)

4. Desert

 

 

WHAT? No cheese? lol.gif

 

Thanks KYH. It's interesting to see differences in customs between different cultures.

post #32 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

 

WHAT? No cheese? lol.gif

 

Thanks KYH. It's interesting to see differences in customs between different cultures.


Not only differences in cultures, but variations from home to home!  There are no hard and fast rules and even if they are they all depend on who's making them up and why.

 

For example, salad at our house is served along with the other dishes.  But my mother always insisted that we put salad on our plates first, not because it was some form of etiquette but she wanted the salad to occupy most of our plates and wanted to make sure we eat it.  As dinner went on she continually directed us to "eat our salad" and often tried to get us to finish our salad before we ate anything else on the plate.  Why?  Not because of a rule but she wanted to get us into the habit of enjoying vegetables more than meat and starch.  I value this because it has indeed made me into a healthier eater, I'm sure of it. 

 

My husband's family on the other hand are from western greece, very close to Italy.  Their eating sequence follows more the Italian sensibility of eating salad as the last course before dessert.  I have often heard my FIL instruct my husband to "finish eating the meat" before reaching for the salad which my mother would keel over and die if she ever heard it lol!  It's a bit odd but I can't adjust the way I eat now, I have grown accustomed to intermittently eating cold crisp salad between mouthfuls of meat. 

 

I just realized that I can't eat in courses lol!  I much prefer to have it all on my plate at once and bounce back and forth from one thing to another. 


 

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #33 of 40
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post




Not only differences in cultures, but variations from home to home!  There are no hard and fast rules and even if they are they all depend on who's making them up and why.

 

For example, salad at our house is served along with the other dishes.  But my mother always insisted that we put salad on our plates first, not because it was some form of etiquette but she wanted the salad to occupy most of our plates and wanted to make sure we eat it.  (My mother doesn't even know who Michael Pollan is but she subscribes to his philosophies to a T). As dinner went on she continually directed us to "eat our salad" and often tried to get us to finish our salad before we ate anything else on the plate.  Why?  Not because of a rule but she wanted to get us into the habit of enjoying vegetables more than meat and starch.  I value this because it has indeed made me into a healthier eater, I'm sure of it. 

 

My husband's family on the other hand are from western greece, very close to Italy.  Their eating sequence follows more the Italian sensibility of eating salad as the last course before dessert.  I have often heard my FIL instruct my husband to "finish eating the meat" before reaching for the salad which my mother would keel over and die if she ever heard it lol!  It's a bit odd but I can't adjust the way I eat now, I have grown accustomed to intermittently eating cold crisp salad between mouthfuls of meat. 

 

I just realized that I can't eat in courses lol!  I much prefer to have it all on my plate at once and bounce back and forth from one thing to another. 


 

 



 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #34 of 40

Soup was also often served as a starter to fill the estomachs before the rest of the meal was served! And, many times soup was part of a preparation split in two. They still do it in France for some fishsoups where the broth is served separate from the fish but still at the same moment.

 

I often heared my grandparents talk of funeral lunches. Family and close friends were invited at lunch after funerals, a moment to share memories and to get on with life. They mostly served what we called "bouillie", nothing more than a soup or light stock made with the toughest meats of beef, simmered until tender with aromates. As a first course or starter, they served the soup which was the stock with finely cut veggies. A bit like a light consommé abundantly filled with vegetables. For the main dish they served the meat from which the soup or stock was made, together with strong mustard, simply boiled potatoes and carrots and a white sauce, also made with the stock or even no sauce at all, just mustard. I had a few of those funeral meals when I was very young, let's say around 50 years ago!

 

Even nowadays people still make that dish, however never when inviting people. It's nostalgic, it's very humble but above all, it's so delicious! 

post #35 of 40

We used to have that often, it was a very tuscan thing to do i think (where my parents came from) and they'd sometimes make a wonderful salsa verde thing - lots of parsley and some crushed garlic, oil and vinegar mixed with the cold boiled beef and left to get some flavor before serving.  Otherwise the boiled chicken and beef, cartrots and celery would be eaten with mustard or whatever (oil, or even ketchup for the kids).  (Welll there was little taste in it by then). 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #36 of 40

I have seen all these terms mixed and matched on printed menus. Especially from uninformed sales people.

Sometimes used as upsell. I personally think you only need to name a course

if it's in print.

I only hope someone will email me when dessert isn't dessert anymore.

My starter is breadwink.gif

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

In the UK the courses are known as

 

starter

main

pudding

cheese

 

Starters can be anything from melon/proscuttio, a broth, eggs mimosa, small amount of pate with melba toast, prawn cocktail (very retro!).  It's usually a small amount of food.



All of those examples are very retro (read 1970s) nowadays don't you think? Haven't seen melba toast on a menu in forever.

post #38 of 40

I find melba toast the ideal thing to go with a liver mousse.  It's strong enough to spread the mousse without breaking, it's thin enough not to overpower it.  Crackers won't do, and bread doesn't set off the softness of it. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #39 of 40

Cultures do vary very much!  If we have a soup with bread, it's generally a lunch for a weekend day, not as a nightly event.  I'd go mad(der :)  ) if I had to make soup every night.

 

Our general nightly routine is  family style, i.e. big dishes of food on the table, plates pre-warmed, serve yourself, a salad, some bread and butter.  Then more than likely, a simple dessert in front of the TV later once the chat has quitened down.  But I do love to sit at the table with everyone and dig in, chat about how''s your day been and share jokes, insights - whatever they may be.  Or on occasion, to bring up problems when needed, finding solutions, etc etc.  This gives several solutions or a concensus and helps that person from different points of view.  I think in always that should be done more often for the benefit of the family.

 

Ok, off my soapbox now :)  Enjoy your dins.....with or without starter!

 

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #40 of 40

Definitely the family together and talking and enjoying each other's company is the best main course!

We feel lucky that though our kids live far away, when they come here they enjoy sitting out till late on the terrace just hanging out and chatting. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
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