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Looking for ideas/uses for semolina smeed fine flour

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I have had this flour for some time and I am looking for some ideas on how to put it to use as well as a few recipes, the place where I bought it at the owner/baker there used it for I guess you could call middle eastern savoury desserts filled with a spinach mixture among other things.

 

Any and all help/input will be greatly appreciated.

post #2 of 5

There are a few middle eastern and south asian sweet desserts that use semolina as well. Lemme know if you're interested in those.

 

You can also make pasta, of course.

 

Fresh rolled coucous is AMAZING!

 

There are also an entire class of breads that use it.

 

Myself at this moment, I'd make some carta di musica/pane carasou. It's a thin yeasted flat bread made with a blend of semolina and regular wheat flours. I season mine with olive oil and rosemary.

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Sounds good do you have any recipes that you would care to share?

post #4 of 5

Sure, but first you must snatch this pebble from my hand wink.gif

 

Off the top of my head, it's

 

50 flour, semolina

50 flour, ap
65 water. room temp

1 salt

1 yeast

 

straight dough, but I suppose you could use a sponge if you wanted to.

 

Ferment, divide, rest/proof, roll thin almost like pasta, brush with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt and chopped rosemary, short proof, bake in very hot oven.

 

Resting is very important with this dough because of the protein content. I use an autolysis on this dough, because the dough requires hard working, and this makes it easier. Some people use less semolina in proportion to regular flour. Zaatar is a very good in place of rosemary. Though I sometimes spike up my zaatar with a little citric acid if the sumac in it is weak.

 

 

No real recipe for couscous, I'm afraid. It's all in the technique. Paula Wolfort has a good explainination. The real trick is getting the rough semolina for the foundation of the couscous balls. You can substitute though. I've heard of every thing from barley or corn grits.

 

Semolina dessert is real easy. Toast your semolina in a pan with some butter. Cook it in milk with sugar and sweet spices (typ green cardoman). When done, top with nuts and raisins that have been fried in butter.

 

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thetincook View Post

Sure, but first you must snatch this pebble from my hand wink.gif

 

Off the top of my head, it's

 

50 flour, semolina

50 flour, ap
65 water. room temp

1 salt

1 yeast

 

straight dough, but I suppose you could use a sponge if you wanted to.

 

Ferment, divide, rest/proof, roll thin almost like pasta, brush with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt and chopped rosemary, short proof, bake in very hot oven.

 

Resting is very important with this dough because of the protein content. I use an autolysis on this dough, because the dough requires hard working, and this makes it easier. Some people use less semolina in proportion to regular flour. Zaatar is a very good in place of rosemary. Though I sometimes spike up my zaatar with a little citric acid if the sumac in it is weak.

 

 

No real recipe for couscous, I'm afraid. It's all in the technique. Paula Wolfort has a good explainination. The real trick is getting the rough semolina for the foundation of the couscous balls. You can substitute though. I've heard of every thing from barley or corn grits.

 

Semolina dessert is real easy. Toast your semolina in a pan with some butter. Cook it in milk with sugar and sweet spices (typ green cardoman). When done, top with nuts and raisins that have been fried in butter.

 




My baker's percentage math stinks, can you translate that plz?

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