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High smoke point oil

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I am looking for a high smoke point oil.   Just using EVOO  is not working the way I want.   May be I am not giving food enough time in the pan, but I am interesting in trying something else, because there may be a better way and I am curious. 

 

So, I  found  this half gallon of canola oil from Costco in the cupboard.   My wife buys things and puts them there. 

 

  Now I read that there is a big difference between "refined" an "unrefined"  oils.  

 

What the heck does that mean???

 

If it is that important, shouldn't it be indicated on the container????

 

The contain does not mention anything about "refinement".     Check out this link.

 

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/50/Smoke-Points-of-Various-Fats

 

Someone give me an idea of what to cook with please.

post #2 of 7

Olive oil (sorry, I hate the old EVOO thing) has a very low flash point. What you have - the canola oil is fine for recipes and deep frying. The refined or unrefined doesn't make a big difference.

post #3 of 7

I guess that canola is better than the rest of the oils, especially olive oil which has the lowest smoke point. A tip that I have heard (but not tried) is to put some raw beans in it in order to extend the smoke point (I'm not sure if it works, it's just something I have heard of). Good luck

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by smokefill View Post

Olive oil (sorry, I hate the old EVOO thing) has a very low flash point. What you have - the canola oil is fine for recipes and deep frying. The refined or unrefined doesn't make a big difference.

There IS a difference between "smoke point" and "flash point"! And refining alters those points!

 

Fat     Quality     Smoke Point
Almond oil           420°F     216°C
Avocado oil           520°F     271°C
Butter           350°F     177°C
Canola oil     Expeller Press     464°F     240°C
Canola oil     High Oleic     475°F     246°C
Canola oil     Refined     470°F     240°C
Coconut oil     Unrefined     350°F     177°C
Coconut oil     Refined     450°F     232°C
Corn oil     Unrefined     320°F     160°C
Corn oil     Refined     450°F     232°C
Cottonseed oil           420°F     216°C
Flax seed oil     Unrefined     225°F     107°C
Ghee (Indian Clarified Butter)           485°F     252°C
Grapeseed oil           420°F     216°C
Hazelnut oil           430°F     221°C
Hemp oil           330°F     165°C
Lard           370°F     182°C
Macadamia oil           413°F     210°C
Olive oil     Extra virgin     375°F     191°C
Olive oil     Virgin     420°F     216°C
Olive oil     Pomace     460°F     238°C
Olive oil     Extra light     468°F     242°C
Olive oil, high quality (low acidity)     Extra virgin     405°F     207°C
Palm oil     Difractionated     455°F     235°C[1]
Peanut oil     Unrefined     320°F     160°C
Peanut oil     Refined     450°F     232°C
Rice bran oil           490°F     254°C
Safflower oil     Unrefined     225°F     107°C
Safflower oil     Semirefined     320°F     160°C
Safflower oil     Refined     510°F     266°C
Sesame oil     Unrefined     350°F     177°C
Sesame oil     Semirefined     450°F     232°C
Soybean oil     Unrefined     320°F     160°C
Soybean oil     Semirefined     350°F     177°C
Soybean oil     Refined     450°F     232°C
Sunflower oil     Unrefined     225°F     107°C
Sunflower oil     Semirefined     450°F     232°C
Sunflower oil, high oleic     Unrefined     320°F     160°C
Sunflower oil     Refined     450°F     232°C
Tea seed oil           485°F     252°C
Vegetable shortening           360°F     182°C
Walnut oil     Unrefined     320°F     160°C
Walnut oil     Semirefined     400°F     204°C
 


If you want an Excel spreadsheet, PM me with your email address...

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #5 of 7

Enrico, imo, extra virgin olive oil is not the best choice for frying things like meat, it doesn't work that well as you observed and it's much too expensive. I only use extra virgin for cold preparations such as salads, pasta etc.. There's also plain olive oil, much cheaper and most likely extracted by heating the olives first. It's the endstage of producing olive oil; they switch to this method after the extra virgin has been extracted by cold pressing.

 

For hot preparations there are a number of better options. I use sunflower oil for frying. It's also neutral in taste. Works fantastic for me. If I want to add flavor, I add a little piece of butter at the end of the frying.

post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enrico747 View Post

I am looking for a high smoke point oil.   Just using EVOO  is not working the way I want.   May be I am not giving food enough time in the pan, but I am interesting in trying something else, because there may be a better way and I am curious. 

 

So, I  found  this half gallon of canola oil from Costco in the cupboard.   My wife buys things and puts them there.

 

  Now I read that there is a big difference between "refined" an "unrefined"  oils.  

 

What the heck does that mean???

 

If it is that important, shouldn't it be indicated on the container????

 

The contain does not mention anything about "refinement".     Check out this link.

 

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/50/Smoke-Points-of-Various-Fats

 

Someone give me an idea of what to cook with please.


Yes, there is a big difference between refined and unrefined oils withe unrefined

oils usually have a higher smoke point.  I'm no expert in this stuff.  I usually use

ghee (clarified butter) if I need a high smoke point.  Coconut oil is also good, but

it doesn't agree with me as well.  Most oils (at least better brands) do indicate 

if the oil is refined or not (e.g. oils by Spectrum).  You can always send a note 

to the manufacturer and they should be able to tell you what the smoke point is.

 

post #7 of 7

Whoops, posted in a duplicate thread:

 

Generally oils are refined unless indicated, unrefined oils are usually a darker colour and more expensive (often found with the luxury ingredients or health foods in a supermarket). They are not really for use at high temperatures.

 

I generally use (refined) peanut (groundnut) oil or beef dripping for cooking at higher temperatures.

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