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Sweet spheres and 'caviar'

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Anyone using this stuff?

 

I just tried a batch using agar and the cold oil method. It's easy, and uses common ingredients available in every kitchen. Regular old gelatin should work ok, as well as pectin.

 

1) Agar up some juice. I used about 2%, but I think you could go as low as 1%.

2) Drip the mixture into a container of cold vegetable oil (chill in fridge). If you're doing big batches, I guess you could use an ice bath to keep the oil cold.

3) Sieve out, and rinse.

 

The big issue seems to be storage. You're supposed to store them in water, but there is a loss of flavor from diffusion. I'm thinking of storing them in an un-agared version of the base, to prevent this.

 

There is also another version of the cold oil method I've been read about. You pour the warm mix into the cold oil while whisking. The whisking action breaks the mix up into little droplets. Seems to be much faster then the ol drip drip drip method. Supposedly you can get tobiko egg level fineness from this process.

 

Of course, there's the big question of all molecular gastronomy items: That's neat, but what can I do with it?

 

Well, It makes a really nice looking garnish for ice cream, and the way has already been paved with boba tea and mochi nuggets on ice cream.

 

Sweet caviar would make an interesting inclusion to creams and mouses.

 

I also think the smaller grades of pearls could be used like crumbs or coconut to coat the sides of pastries and desserts.

post #2 of 17

The finished product of the agar stores fine on a sheet tray and covered in the refrigerator.  If you make the spheres using calcium and sodium then you store them in liquid so they do not burst because it is a small membrane surrounding the liquid center.  At the same time the solution that you storing them in helps make the spheres rounder over time.

post #3 of 17

<<Of course, there's the big question of all molecular gastronomy items: That's neat, but what can I do with it?>>

 

Better yet, "does it taste good?"

post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks CBM4!

 

Wilson, in this case they do. They taste just like what they were made of. Sometimes, if you're using a alginate calcium method, depending on the calcium salt you use, it can have a slight bitter taste.

post #5 of 17

Bl think of the spheres as tiny pieces of jello.  The small alginate spheres you don't notice the skin but if you make larger ones some times the skin can be a turnoff to most people because it doesn't dissolve in your mouth.

 

One application for them are to put them in a item that you are baking because they are heat stable when baked.  When you go to bite into your item you now have small spheres of a juice that usually could not be put in them.  Such as a cupcake instead of scooping out the center and filling with lemon curd you can make lemon spheres to put in the batter.  

post #6 of 17

OK, I'm molecularly challenged.

I am making homemade vanilla bean ice cream tomorrow.

I am very fortunate to have a very special Balsamic vinegar.

After reading Tins post, I got to thinking that I would like to add balsamic spheres to the Ice cream.

Possible?? Will only attempt this is does not alter the flavor at all.

 

I have my sugar box here so I'm sure I have just about any additive I might need.

pan

oh my, i am sipping this balsamic as we speak

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post #7 of 17

I found balsamic affects agar differently then most things the other day when making a fluid gel with it.  It doesn't allow the agar to set firmly enough.  I am not sure if this is because of the acid or sugar content.  By will the spheres change the flavor of the ice cream I am a bit confused because don't you want the balsamic flavor to come through while eating the ice cream?

post #8 of 17

I actually wanted them to pop as not to blend the flavor. I that not possible? I thought this way because of the quality of the balsamic.

I'm sure it's low acidity. ?? 6%

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post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Sugar tends to mask acidity. Acid can inhibit gel formation. Agar should be good to ph 2.5.

 

 

Quote:
I actually wanted them to pop as not to blend the flavor.

 

You want them with a liquid center? Agar wouldn't be my first choice for spheres with a liquid center.

post #10 of 17

In order to make spheres with a fluid center you would need to use a sodium alginate bath and calcium lactate in the balsamic.  If the spheres are made properly and handled carefully they wouldn't change the ice cream but they still could burst.  Also if you are mixing it into the ice cream and freezing it then the liquid center wouldn't help much because it would be frozen.

post #11 of 17

plz can anyone give me a good recipe for raspberry agar agar caviar

 

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

Well, how about

200g rasberry puree, strained

50ml water

2g agar agar.

 

Soak the agar in the water till hydrated. Bring raspberry puree to ~50 deg C. Simmer water and agar mixture till agar is dissolved. Combine with the warm puree. Drip into chilled oil.

post #13 of 17

hey thanks, this recipe works. i tried in the oil and it was good but the problem that i was facing was to remove the oil completely from the spheres. then i tried it with cold sugar syrup + raspberry puree, it works fantastic.

 

post #14 of 17

Is there a way to prevent these balls from completely gelling? I'd like to make a batch ahead of time for a dinner party and store them in the fridge. How long will they stay if refrigerated? Thanks!

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by jahblessed View Post

hey thanks, this recipe works. i tried in the oil and it was good but the problem that i was facing was to remove the oil completely from the spheres. then i tried it with cold sugar syrup + raspberry puree, it works fantastic.

 

To rinse the caviar, you can use warm water while the caviar is in a chinacap. Tepid water actually.  Too hot and they will disintegrate, too cold and it does no good with the oil.

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post #16 of 17

You can vacuum pack them, if you can do so.  They will stay intact for a week if they are made properly.  If you cannot vacuum pack, use a good plastic container, with a very tight lid. If they start to "bleed", you can give them a quick rinse in warm water.  I wouldn't do this more than three or four days ahead of time.  The ones I make, we keep for a week, but only when vac packed.

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post #17 of 17

I attended an event at Shady Canyon Country Club in  Irvine Ca. Beautiful evening filled with fantastic foods that pleased

every palate.

 

Served was a cheesecake dessert served in shot glasses with what I believe were sweet cavair. Beautiful colors, all shaped like large pearls of cavair. Each popping burst of flavor in your mouth.

 

Now, I would either like to know how to make sweet cavair or know where to purchase it.

 

can you help??

 

Please PM me

 

your assistance is greatly appreciated

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