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Secret Recipes - Page 2

post #31 of 43

ChrisBelgium,

 

The recipe is not mine, it is directly from the Time-Life recipe book, written in 1968. Both of your remarks are "spot on" IMHO, however, the OP was requesting the recipes from the source! Hence the "note" concerning cooking times for asparagus.

 

That being said, I'm seriously contemplating revising the directions of those recipes to reflect current thinking and knowledge.

 

Remember, these recipes were written in 1968 or earlier for use by American housewives, most of whom probably had no idea as to who Julia Childs was nor understood sauté, liaison, and a host of other terms.

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post #32 of 43

This thread is making me drool!

 

Welcome, Sternlight. If you get a chance, stop in the Welcome Forum to introduce yourself. For now I'll just say, Baruch ha-Bah.

 

Mezzaluna

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post #33 of 43

Sternlight, we seem to have strayed from your question, sorry.

I was thinking about this as I feel asleep last night.

Have you tried to “Google” in the different languages?

Just a thought…

My Mother’s cousin went to MIT, he did his undergrad at UH, now he’s a yoga teacher and artist… go figure…

 

Chef PeteMcCracken, now this begs the question, can I freeze both the soup and the pate?

 

I swear I heard an audible AWK! Come from my husband as I read this thread to him…

“It’s creamy, I don’t like creamy” as my grandmother use to say, Mais fica, something like more for me!!

 

…and isn’t that something… how TV has changed the culinary world and how the average person views it?  I was just reading the latest Reader’s Digest Kindle Version and there is an article about how kids are now in.   I do have to admit, I haven’t bought a cookbook in years!!  Sorry to all of you who write, but with the World Wide Web and that vast waste land called Television…

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post #34 of 43

I have little experience freezing pates.

 

For cream soups to be frozen, I prefer to use something other than a roux to thicken.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

....Chef PeteMcCracken, now this begs the question, can I freeze both the soup and the pate?...
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post #35 of 43

Chris, you are making me hungry.  I'm going to have to buy some really nice bread to go with my garden radishes!

I will try your tip about the asparagus peel in the broth.   Anything for more great flavor.  Thanks!

Donna

post #36 of 43

Chef PeteMcCracken, when you say I prefer to use something other than a roux to thicken 

what excatly do you mean?

I've never frozen a creamed soup before, mostly the broth types,

well I did recently make a big pot of Split Pea with Ham (ala Martha Stewart, my girl!),

gave half to my Mom and froze the rest for me

(AWK, it's creamy I don't like it, oh, that was my husband)

I hade bought a Honey Baked Ham a while back and still had the bone in the freezer.

When I was doing my monthly inventor check of the deep freeze, Voila!! I like finding suprises, HA!! wink.gif

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post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

Chef PeteMcCracken, when you say I prefer to use something other than a roux to thicken 

what excatly do you mean?...

I use a modified food starch such as Signature Secrets, UltraSperse, Mochiko, etal.
 

 


Edited by PeteMcCracken - 7/2/11 at 3:31pm
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post #38 of 43

Mochiko, really that sounds interesting.  You made me think, do I have any?  I guess I missed that on my grocery list, but will do so the next time we go to the "asian market" (love garlic mochiko chicken)

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post #39 of 43

Julia Child has various thickeners for her cream soups - cream of spinach soup thickened with rice, i believe a cucumber soup (do i remembe rright?) thickened with semolina (cream of wheat), potatoes are always good as thickeners.  there are tons of ways to thicken a cream soup - even just blending most stuff will thicken it. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #40 of 43

I realize I haven't been very helpful to the OP so far. Sorry David! I'll make it up with this recipe I found. They claim it's the original version since forever used in the Sacher café in Vienna. I know who posted this recipe and I trust their claim of originality. If not, I'm only the pianoplayer! I only translated from dutch into english, so all credits to Libelle who posted it. Enjoy!

 

Original recipe from the Sacher café in Vienna (in Dutch)

http://www.libelle.nl/2010/12/sachertorte-recepten-recept-van-de-dag-libelle-magazine-blad/

 

Sachertorte
(comment from the webpage; as made since forever by café Sacher in Vienna. The classis sachertorte isn't difficult to make at all.


Recipe for 12-14 persons

--Ingredients; 175g chopped dark pure chocolate (70% cacao)/ 150g soft unsalted butter/ 150 g sugar/ 6 large eggs, separated/ 150g flour, sieved/ 175g good apricotjam/ chocolate glaze (see recipe below)/ chocolate holly leaves (see recipe below)/ chocolate hazzlenuts/ a couple of red currant berries or cranberries/

 

--Preparation of the Sachertorte; Grease a removable cakemold of 22 cm diameter with butter, clad the bottom with baking paper and grease that as well/ Melt the chocolate in a bowl over a pan with hot water/ Use a mixer at high speed to whisk the butter for around 8 minutes or until fluffy/ Add 100g sugar in several parts at a time while still whisking/ Add eggyolks one at a time/ Lower the speed of the mixer and add the melted chocolate/ Now fold the flour in/ Beat the eggwhites until stiff and add 50g sugar in several parts at a time until peaks appear/ Fold 1/4 part of the eggwhites in the chocolatemixture, then gently add the rest of the eggwhites and fold in/ Put the mixture in the mold and gently spread even/ Bake 25-40 minutes at 180°C: test with pushing in a pin that has to come out cleanly/ Gently cut around the edges and remove the mold/ Let cool for 30 minutes/ Remove the bottom of the mold and the baking paper and let the cake cool entirely/ Heat the jam 1-2 minutes on low fire, sieve and spread abundantly on top and sides of the cake/ Leave the jam to pull in the cake/ Pour the chocolateglaze in the middle of the cake and spread with a paletknife over the whole cake/ Leave the chocolateglaze to harden/ Decorate with chocolate holly leaves, chocolate hazzlenuts and berries/

--Preparation of the chocolateglaze; Melt 250g chopped dark chocolate in a bowl over a pan with hot water/ Take from the heat and stir in 100g unsalted butter, a little at a time/ Leave to cool at a stage where the chocolate still can be poured/

 

--Preparation of the chocolate holly leaves; Paint melted chocolate on one side of holly leaves/ Leave to harden and paint another layer over the first one/ Gently remove the chocolate from the holly leaves/

 

post #41 of 43

... if I'm going to freeze a creamed soup and I do use a roux, does that mean that it may split once reheated?

Is that why I want to use some other type of thickening agent?

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post #42 of 43

Yup!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

... if I'm going to freeze a creamed soup and I do use a roux, does that mean that it may split once reheated?

Is that why I want to use some other type of thickening agent?



 

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post #43 of 43

I'm sorry I couldn;t deliver sooner.

 

Here is Barbara Maher's Sachertorte and i'll copy out the whole introduction and all. Typing quickly so there will be typos.   

As she so authoritatively describes it it really seems to be a "genuine' and "original" version. 

 

"Sachertorte

 

Apart from black forest kirschtorte, this is probably the best-known chocolate cake in the world, and is instantly recognizable with its simple flat shape and a plain undecorated chocolate covering with "Sacher" piped across the centre; it seems incredible that it should have been covered to the point of legal action being taken to claim the rights to the ooriginal recipe

The nbame is closely associated with the Sacher family of vienna.  Franz Sacher had relinquished his position as chef to the Austrian Chancellor Cl;emens Lochar Metternich in 1840, so that he could open a delicatessen shop and hotel in the Weihburggasse.  His three sons took over the vaerious responsiblities on his retirement, and the youngest, Eduoard, established himself in the gastronomic history of Vienna as the founder of the hotel which was named after him, in the 1880s.  As an exclusive speciality of this hotel, Franz Sacher's Torte helped establish its fame and reputaqtion.  The hotel became a rendezvous for the aristocracy, for the Hungarians and Bohemians and eventually even the Archduke and Duchess.  And the torte also ousted the Linzertorte from its hitherto premier position as favorite. 

The closely guarded seecret of the Sachertorte recipe meanwhile inspired an extraordinary variety of "authentic" versions. The most popular were based on an equal weight mixture and others included almonds.  Maybe at last the truly authentic recipe has come to light. 

Thhis recipe was given to a lady attending cookery clases conducted by Anna Sacher, Eduoard's wife, in 1883.  It used the old measures, which i have converted to grammes. 

 

Anna Sacher;s Sachertorte (1883)

140 g dark plain chocolate  (my note - this usually means semi sweet cooking chocolate in europe)

100 g butter

140 g caster sugar (my note: fine sugar)

4 egg yolks

4 egg whites

70 g plain flour

 

gas 3  170 C, 325 F /60 minutes

 

Set the chocolate in the oven on a plate to warm and melt gently,.  cool slightly.  Beat the butter and sugar in a bowl until pale and fluffy then beat in the choclate.  Weat in the egg yolks one at a time and combine well.  Whip up the egg whites to a stiff snow and mix lightly into the chocolate mixture with a metal spoon.  Fold in the seived flour carefully, taking care not to lose any air.  Have ready a 22 cm (1 1/2 inch() springform tin, greased and floured.  Pour in the mixture, rap the tin on the work top to dispel any air pockets, and bake in the preheated oven.  Cool on a wire rack and then cover with a plain chocolate icing. You may like to coat the cake first with apricot jam to insulate it against the chocolate"

 

From Barbara Maher: Cakes, Penguin Books (1982) p. 149-150

 

That was her recipe.  I'll add the chocolate icing below from her book. 

 

"Chocolate icing

To ice a 22 - 24 cm (9 inch) cake

 

160 gm plain chocolate

250 ml water

1 tbsp butter

140 gm preserving or granulated sugar

 

Melt the chocolate with 2 tbsp of water in a small fireproof bowl in the oven or over a pan of simmering water.  Stir in the butter until smooth.  Boil the remaining water in a copper sugar boiler to the pearl stage (104C 221F); draw away from the heat and plunge the pan into a bowl of cold water so that the sugar stops cooking.  Pour immediately over the melted chocolate and stir with a wooden spoon until the right texture is achieved (a metal cooking sppn should stay lightly coated with icing).  Not all the sugar syrup may be needed.  When the icing starts to cool a little, pour it over the cake.  Set in a hot oven for just a few moments for the icing to set and to take on a high glaze.  Cool at room temperature, never a cold place, as this causes a grey-white bloo,m to appear. 

 

From: Barbara Maher, Cakes. Penguin books 1982 page 74

 

This book is wonderful and apparently out of print, alas.  mine is paperback and is falling apart and is just a bunch of pages loose in a taped together cover. 

It has the BEST tarte tatin and the best dobostorte (really unusual filling)

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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