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Easy way to remove chicken skin?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Suggested way other than a Sumo match to remove chicken skin before grilling chicken parts?

 

Mark

post #2 of 16

It's much easier to remove chicken skin once the chicken is cooked.  The chicken skin plays an important role in the grilling process: keeping the meat moist and juicy.  Remove it before you grill it and guaranteed you will cook up the driest chewyest chicken you've ever had the misfortune of eating. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

I had discarded that idea thinking that by removing the skin after grilling I'd also be removing all the basting grilling sauce?

 

Mark

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg2 View Post

I had discarded that idea thinking that by removing the skin after grilling I'd also be removing all the basting grilling sauce?

 

Mark

For me, sauce goes on AFTER grilling.

 

With regards to brining or marinading, pre-grilling, loosing the skin after grilling should not have a dramatic effect for those who do not appreciate the crispy skin, IMHO, besides, the fat rendered from the skin keeps the chicken moist, IMHO.
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 16

Here is how I remove duck skin:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeD4O7EDGFk

 

dcarch

post #6 of 16

Putting aside the points raised above, I don't understand why you're having a wrestling match.

 

Start by breaking down the chicken. Then work your fingers under the skin, piece by piece, until there's enough to grab. Hold the skinless part in one hand, the edge of the skin with the other, and pull. Just like removing a glove.

 

Because of the grease, it sometimes helps to hold the skin with a paper towel or kitchen towel for a more secure grip.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcarch View Post

Here is how I remove duck skin:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeD4O7EDGFk

 

dcarch


 

remove duck skin?! :( I'm sad.

post #8 of 16

With chicken parts, the only tricky ones to skin are wings and drum sticks. Unless you're breaking down your own chickens, I think this is a shopping problem and not a technique problem.

 

On the grill, chicken thighs are probably the best cut. Good flavor, good portion size, easy to eat. Easy to pull the skin off or even buy skinless. They all cook at the same rate which can't be said of mixing breasts, wings, thighs and drums. 

 

Even if you're breaking down your own chicken, collect like parts together so they can get the same treatment and finish at the same time.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 16

No need to be sad.

 

This is the way to make crispy duck skin.

 

dcarch

duck7.jpg

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pcieluck View Post




 

remove duck skin?! :( I'm sad.



 

post #10 of 16

I think the only reason taking the skin off of the drum might be difficult is that it kinda clings to the joint to the foot. I tendto explose the end of the bone and cut that join right off. I feel it just plainly looks better, and would make it easier for this person to take the skin off... A few photos for an example

 

53575_165999933424068_100000421873622_430085_2577978_o.jpg

194298_200996156591112_100000421873622_667981_385363_o.jpg

post #11 of 16

After cooking can be preferable.  If you are wanting to marinade, this home cook's idea is to leave the skin on, but poke the meat of the bird with skewer and massage the bird well so the marinade penetrates the meat but the skin is still there to keep it moist.  Once cooked, the skin will separate easily from the flesh.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Good point on the thighs. I saw the skinless package at the grocery yesterday and plan on grilling those with sauce just as if the skin were on and see what happens.

 

Mark

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg2 View Post

Good point on the thighs. I saw the skinless package at the grocery yesterday and plan on grilling those with sauce just as if the skin were on and see what happens.

 

Mark


 

Nothing very dramatic.  Since thighs only have skin on one side to begin with, you've probably already eaten some "skinless" already.  It's a good idea to brine or marinate chicken before grilling, but without the protection and extra fat skin brings to the party it's an even better idea.

 

We grill chicken brochette quite often.  While breast is probably the preferred piece for restaurant "kabob" and "tandoori" cuisines, I prefer to skin, bone, quarter and skewer thighs.  Not only do they taste better and more "chicken-y" than breasts, they're more forgiving and tolerate over-marinating or brining better, they do not dry as easily when (slightly) overcooked.  (They're really very easy to bone and skin, and you can usually save a fair bit by doing it yourself.  But it's also nice to have the butcher do it for you, and no one will arrest you for letting him do it.)

 

If you're grilling-on a tomato-based, sweet, barbecue sauce, I suggest holding the sauce until a minute or two before taking the chicken off the grill.  The idea is to cook the sauce just barely enough to create a glaze, but not so much as to burn the sugars which become dominating and bitter.  Skin-on pieces are different in that glazing improves skin texture and the skin protects the poultry.  I prefer to dress skinless chicken with lime or lemon juice and a sprinkle of herbs and/or rub in the final stages of cooking, then sauce on the plate. 

 

Try it each way, and see what you think.

 

Luck with the cluck,

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/8/11 at 4:32pm
post #14 of 16

 i pretty much use chicken thighs for anything curried, stewed(vindaloo), or grilled(tandoori). i take the skin off for the curries and tagines but leave the skin on when grilling....seems kinda naked or something without it. while i love chicken b's for delicate sautes...picatta, marsala, francaise, pastas, grilled to top salads or in sandwiches, they just can't come close to the flavor that thighs bring to the table....think i'll give the skewered thighs a whirl....is that a spicy yogurt marinade or herb oil?  whatever i like or feel like or have on hand i'm guessing...hmmm..okay, i'm intrigued..

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #15 of 16

Whatever you feel like. 

 

For Independence Day I used some of that orange / peach / mango brine I told you about, and they were great with regular 'merican barbecue sauce.  A couple of days before, I used a marinade heavily laced with sumac.  It could have as easily been a yogurt based tikka or vindaloo.  Or something Mexican.

 

I prefer thighs over breasts for any of the sautes or pan sauced dishes which you associate with veal, like piccata, marsala, etc.  It's not really better, just easier and you can get away with overcooking it a little.   Thighs have your back, while breasts are in your face.

 

BDL 

 

 

 

post #16 of 16

thanks for the anatomy lesson...now i know!

the elegant and uppercrust perfectly sauteed chicken cutlets have it all over the lowly but tasty thighs as far as plate presentation. plus i can charge more for the b's.....just curious, has anyone ever stuffed boneless thighs? i'm thinking a combo of sweet and spicy italian sausage, in the style of the hunter...cacciatora or maybe arrabiata.....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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