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To Speak or Not to Speak! - Page 2

post #31 of 33
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thanks tin for the well needed laugh..i remember that skit...funny then, still funny now.....it's kinda what i'd like to do with that organic salmon right about now!!!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #32 of 33

O.K. This will give you guys (likely) a good laugh and should leave you scratching your heads and wondering if I need my bricks counted.(For the record, yes I do. No doubt.)  I grew up in a Catholic household back in the days when you couldn't eat meat on any Friday, not just Lent. We had codfish (salt cod) creamed on toast, tuna, creamed on toast or in a noodle casserole, fish sticks and various pan fried fish species. It was high living (in my opinion) when we had salmon loaf or patties. So one day my mother brought home a whole frozen salmon. I was all excited, because I really liked canned salmon and smoked salmon. I couldn't wait for her to cook that fish up. Finally the great day came. It was the most God-awful thing I ever put in my mouth. It had nothing to do with how it was cooked as she had covered it with lemon slices and baked/broiled it in the oven. Perfectly innocent. You have to go a long way to find a fish that I don't like. I tend to like fish that tastes a little "fishy", perch being my favorite. I like redfish, I like carp. I even like sheephead out of the Mississippi river (a fish no one keeps, but great if you clean it right). But I can't stand salmon that isn't canned or smoked. I get the "you just haven't had it cooked right" routine all the time.(I get that regarding liver too.) It's my not-so-humble opinion that anyone who would eat salmon would eat the *ss out of a skunk, and I'm not backward about saying so. I have a crew who will hound down salmon, but turn their noses up at rainbow trout because it's "too fishy". I tell them they haven't got a taste bud in their head if they think that, but they just think I'm nuts. Having said all that, I had a salesman bring in some salmon from Norway as a sample. I recruited someone from the crew willing to eat it. I grilled it and decided I should at least taste it as it wouldn't kill me, and was shocked that I actually liked it. I might have eaten all of it if I hadn't promised it to someone. Which convinced me that how it's cooked (again, in my opinion) has little to do with it, it's more about where it's from. This particular salmon had initially been cryovaced and frozen.  I don't know what made that Norway salmon so good. When you bit into it it sort of popped and oil just flowed out of it, but the oil was good. It had a fish taste that I can best describe as clean. Definite fish taste, but not the kind that makes you cringe. I haven't tried any organic salmon, and I haven't had any from Scotland. It may actually be better tasting. Organic and plain wild caught Scottish salmon might both taste the same. Don't know. 


Edited by greyeaglem - 8/7/11 at 1:30am
post #33 of 33

Getting back to the original question, I think the patron had a wild hair about something else, and was taking it out that way.

 

We don't go out all that often, and when we do it's to fine-dining places. Thus, I'm not interested in the price of the special. I expect it to be higher, and just don't care. And, in fact, I think it beyond tacky for the server to mention it.

 

In Joey's case, we're talking about a regular practice of not mentioning the price, a special that isn't particularly out of line with menu pricing, and a regular customer. There's no justification for her complaining. Indeed, just the opposite. Knowing how things are done in that restaurant, if price was an issue for her, it's her obligation to ask.

 

I'm not saying this is the normal practice. Most people do want to know the price up front. It's incredible, in fact, how many people read a menu from the right hand side first. So, yes, in general the prices should be given. But this isn't a general case. It's a very specific instance, and all factors should be taken into consideration. When that's done, I believe, the customer's complaint was off the wall at best.

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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