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What Did You Cook For Independence Day?

Poll Results: Hot Dog or Hamburger?

Poll expired: Aug 4, 2011  
  • 7% (1)
    Hot Dog (or Meatless Dawgs)
  • 7% (1)
    Hamburger (or any type of Patty)
  • 42% (6)
    All Of The Above
  • 42% (6)
    None Of The Above, Thank You
14 Total Votes  
post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

WOW!!

It was a blast at our house yesterday!! 

We had a great fireworks display as well as Nature’s Own fireworks with a spectacular Thunder and Lightning storm.

We grilled hamburgers and hot dogs; all the tops imaginable along with Hatch chilies.  The always welcome potato salad was present, dill pickles and root beer.  We all ate ice cream while watching the show.

We have switched from Nathan’s to Hebrew National dogs and next year may be Veggie or Turkey Burgers.

post #2 of 25

We grilled tri-tips, chicken kabobs, and a few hot dogs for the kids over a white oak fire. 

 

BDL

post #3 of 25

Pulled pork, BBQ spare ribs, grilled a 10 pound turkey, coleslaw, pickled carrot salad, veggie tray, misc munchies.

post #4 of 25

We don't celebrate it on this side of the pond! 

 

Last night's dinner was crab/lemon/chilli/EVOO/ with linguine.

post #5 of 25


We made a meal modeled on some of the dishes which would have been served on an up-scale table in colonial Virginia in 1776. Included was:

 

Sally Lunn bread

Stuffed loin of pork in a ham gravy, garnished with forcemeat balls

Potato pudding

Minted peas in butter

 

Everything was made using 18th century equipment, on an open fire.

 

Truth to tell, it wasn't actually to celebrate Independence Day (although I did have a copy of the Declaration posted). Rather it was part of our on-going foodways interpretation at Fort Boonesborough.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 25

I made burgers, brats, hot dogs, jalapeno poppers, and salad with homemade cherry vinaigrette. Sadly the only brats left at the store were the crummy pre-cooked ones.

 

Other people brought quinoa salad, baked beans, turkey burgers with grated zucchini, and boca burgers.

 

Jalapeno poppers are easy, just cut in half lengthwise and remove the seeds. Mix up some cream cheese and mozzarella, add some chopped parsley and garlic, and pile it into the peppers. Grill until black on the bottom and toasty on top. Amazing!

 

Cherry vinaigrette is just cherries, balsamic, lemon juice, olive oil, and a bit of salt and sugar. Blend (in blender) until smooth.

 

The guest who brought the turkey burgers says the grated zucchini keeps them from drying out. I didn't try them.

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 

pickled carrot salad sounds really good, MaryB, would you mind sharing that one?

post #8 of 25

does vodka count? i heard it's not just for breakfast anymore!.....crazy busy, tough, tough weekend...couldn't  seem to even form sentences or words by monday....and on my way to my car at 12:30 sunday night, i felt/heard something run past me close. when i got my headlights on, it was a bear.....one martini, two martini, three martini, floor! sometimes drinks overrule food....think we made up for it on tuesday with a little party...cocktail shrimp, crabcakes, grilled salmon, grilled corn on the cob, grilled stuffed poblano peppers, caprise salad, lemon bars...i just pulled out whatever was in my fridge, so things may not have matched...oh well...it was good anyway....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #9 of 25

Pickled carrot salad is simple, sliced blanched carrots in salted water, strips of green pepper, sliced onion in a dressing made from 1 can tomato soup, 1/2 cup cider vinegar(I use other vinegars to change the taste sometimes), 1/4 cup olive oil, tablespoon dried mustard, and a tablespoon or so of Worcestershire that is simmered. Mix all together and let it marinate overnight. Keeps for a week in the fridge.

post #10 of 25

what are forcemeatballs?

 

and tell me more about potato pudding, please.

post #11 of 25

Forcemeat balls, Carnuba, are small meatballs made from finely ground or pounded (as with a mortar & pestle) meats and other ingredients. More like sausage meat, actually. In the 18th century they were often used to garnish made dishes, and most cooks had their own mixtures. For instance, Hannah Glasse, in her 1745 book, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, made her's with veal.

 

Oddly enough, they often were categorized as sauces---perhaps because they were most often combined with a sauce or gravy to dress a dish. Most of the time they would be dusted with flour and fried, except some sources say that if to be used with a white sauce they should be boiled instead.

 

Our recipe (which can be found in our book, A Colonial Virginia Book of Cookery) uses a combination of country ham, chicken, herbs, spices, etc.

 

Puddings, both savory and sweet, baked and boiled, were widespread in the 18th century, and, as a category, broader than what we think of because puddings and custards were not separated. Our potato pudding is adapted from one found in Amelia Simmons' American Cookery. Published in 1796, it is considered to be the first American cookbook. Her recipe is a bit sweet for our tastes, so, among other things, we cut the sugar.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 

oh my gravy Joey!!  a bear?!

that vodka would have been flowing if I ever saw a bear!! 

Shoot!! 

post #13 of 25

kgirl,

 i see a lot of bears where i live, even have them on my deck...just never got close enough to one to smell them! this one made my neck hair stand up though...it was just a little too close for this cowgirl!!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer 

 

Our recipe (which can be found in our book, A Colonial Virginia Book of Cookery) uses a combination of country ham, chicken, herbs, spices, etc.



Is this a book that you have written?

I would love to read it, where can I find it?

 

post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 

Saw a bear once, but it was maybe a good, oh say 1/2 of a football field away.  Mister spotted it first.  We loads of other critters in our backyard.

BTW, burger or dog joey?

post #16 of 25

Pulled pork, potato salad, ABT's, Chocolate Delight (the stuff with instant pudding), and a strawberry pizza were what I made.  Others made green beans with new potatoes, and various fruits and dips.  That was at the campground!

post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

Pickled carrot salad is simple, sliced blanched carrots in salted water, strips of green pepper, sliced onion in a dressing made from 1 can tomato soup, 1/2 cup cider vinegar(I use other vinegars to change the taste sometimes), 1/4 cup olive oil, tablespoon dried mustard, and a tablespoon or so of Worcestershire that is simmered. Mix all together and let it marinate overnight. Keeps for a week in the fridge.


Mary, we called those "Copper Pennies" growing up and I made them quite often last summer.  Need to make some very soon!  Thanks for the reminder.

 

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

Saw a bear once, but it was maybe a good, oh say 1/2 of a football field away.  Mister spotted it first.  We loads of other critters in our backyard.

BTW, burger or dog joey?

huh? burger or dog? something obviously went over my head.....

joey

yeah, you got javalinas where you live...they are nasty critters, but of course if you're that ugly, you'd probably be mean too!!!
 

oh, just saw the poll at the top of the page...sorry...had a grilled jerk chicken sausage on a soft french roll with tequila sweet potato fries.....the red meat thing just ain't for me but i still love the whole idea of eating a hot dog...good mustard, relish, onions etc..now there are so many great chicken or turkey choices..god, i love america! when we're not having a nervous breakdown it's a great place to live!

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 

GIRL!!  (Joey)

I just love food, period!  Dogs, burger, boca, turkey, chicken, tofu, it doesn't matter...

I went to the local market today, and they had these really beautiful "artisanal" hot dogs, $8.00 per pound!!

Oh My Gravy and chips!!

(do not like javalinas, nasty, mean critters, and yes, way ugly!)

post #20 of 25
It has been a few years since the bear incident at Yosemite. It was sort of funny, maybe I'll write it up someday.

We went to a bbq, watched some nice fireworks from their back yard. I made a cucumber salad with Greek yogurt that turned out very tasty. My cucumber plant has some nice blossoms on it, I'm looking forward to making the salad again with fresh, homegrown cukes!

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by allie View Post

Pulled pork, potato salad, ABT's, Chocolate Delight (the stuff with instant pudding), and a strawberry pizza were what I made.  Others made green beans with new potatoes, and various fruits and dips.  That was at the campground!



? What are ABT's?

 

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post
? What are ABT's?

 

 

ABT is an acronym for "atomic buffalo turds."  They are jalapenos, stuffed with cheese, wrapped in bacon, and usually smoked, or otherwise cooked "indirect."

 

BDL

 

post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 

YUM!!

I need to know more about these things you call ABT's!!

post #24 of 25

Is this a book that you have written?

I would love to read it, where can I find it?

 

I had answered you almost immediately, KG, but the post disappeared. I assumed a moderator had deleted it, but, based on correspondence I've been having with the administrator, it must have been a glitch in the system, 'cuz there's no evidence of any moderator playing with it. Anyway, thought I'd post it again.

 

If you or anyone else is interested, A Colonial Virginia Book of Cookery is self-published, and available from Historic Foodways, PO Box 519, Richmond, KY 40476. Regular retail price is $12.00 plus $3.00 S&H, but for Cheftalk members the price is $9.50 plus the S&H. Make sure you identify yourself as a Cheftalk member, and give the name of the person to whom it should be inscribed.

 

Checks, money orders, etc. should be made payable to Brook or Barbara Elliott.

 

Alternatively, the book is available in the gift shops at Fort Boonesborough SP, and Old Fort Harrod SP, both in Kentucky. But, of course, you won't get the discount by purchasing them there.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #25 of 25

The ABT's we like are jalapenos cut in half lengthwise, seed and remove membranes.  Then stuff with a mixture of cream cheese, pineapple, green onions, and sometimes crab meat.  Wrap with bacon, sprinkle on some Baldy's Rub (my other half's rub mixture for his bbq), and then smoke.  I made 30 on the 4th and they were gone within 15 minutes!  I don't think I could make enough to have leftovers when we're at a party.

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