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World Pastry Forum 2010: Candy Recipe Questions

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I'm looking over some recipes from the World Pastry Forum as presented at this blog blogquat.blogspot.com and I don't understand why they're doing some things.

 

1) Almost all their ganache centers include sorbitol. I don't know what this is doing. Its main food uses are as a sugar replacer (though it's less sweet then sucrose), and as a humectant (though I can't see why they would need one in a coated candy center)

 

2) Almost all their ganache centers call for Mycryo cocao butter. You can temper ganache? Otherwise I don't get it.

 

3) Some of their recipes call for sugar cubes. For example Nougat, Marzipan, and liquid booze centers for bon bons.

post #2 of 5

1. Sorbitol is often added to ganache high in fat to slow it from becoming rancid

2. Mycryo is also used for solidifying and stablising.

3.  Cubed sugar has less impurities than free flowing sugar-its why it is also used for sugar work.

post #3 of 5

Tin,

You really don't need CButter to temper ganache. You can achieve a good tempered ganache by using a fast mixing method.

Like a food processor. Ingredients in, hot liqhid oover the top, process.

 

A lot of people think that sorbitol acts as a mold inhibitor, but when you reduce or replace the sugar there will be less melting.

just my thoughts

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post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys!

 

I was a little bit confused by the mycryo, because some of other ganache recipes called for regular cocoa butter instead. Wasn't sure why there was a difference.

 

I've found on egullet a calculator that figures out the free water/water activity of the ganache. Is this a concern for you guys or do you just turn them over faster?

 

Never tried making ganache in a food processer. I've always just poured the hot cream over the chocolate and stir. Sometimes let it sit for a little bit to let the heat do its work.

 

Ever try a water ganache? I'm hearing good things about its flavor.

post #5 of 5

I have some good water ganache recipes, but I prefer cream based ganache for most things- for the thicker texture.

 

 

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