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Fresh Fish Prices

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I'm very curious to know what people in land locked states pay for fish,

whether fresh or frozen.  Specifically salmon. 

Do you buy farmed salmon?

When you say "organic salmon", what exactly do you mean?

Do your customers desire salmon?  Will they pay for farmed salmon?

Halibut is incredibly expensive for me.

Upwards of $20/lb, whole fish, fresh.

Anyways, how is it in your town?

post #2 of 17

Oh my god, fish is SO expensive here. 

 

I paid 15 bucks a pound for snapper (fresh loins, skin on) last week. We pay.... around 100 bucks for fresh skin on salmon by the case. It comes with 3 large loins.

 

For frozen grouper, I paid about 4 bucks per 8-10 ounce serving. They keep pushing me to do fish specials at work, but its just so expensive, and I feel bad running a 45% food cost special, and then worry about having any left over. 

 

The price of fish (and potatoes) may soon be the death of me.

post #3 of 17

I just got fish in today      Fresh Columbia River Salmon skin on pbo filet $9.97 #

 

                                      Whole gutted Halibut    $9.79 not a great yield But  some of the best fish ever

 

                                       Fresh Dungeness crab Meat 1# ders   $21.48 pretty high for Oregon

 

Maybe I could buy them here for you and UPS them

post #4 of 17

$15 pound for snapper????  Were talking red snapper...rock cod?? I see it in the grocery store from time to time for under $5...fresh skin off.

 

What are you paying for spuds?  90ct bakers $20+....70ct #2's around $14 (for fries)

Yellow Onions $18

Red Onions $5...#25

post #5 of 17

Fresh red snapper, skin on. I wanted to do a sea bass special, but no was I can justify a 35 dollar special with a fish that costs almost 20 bucks a pound. I just think it wouldn't sell. 22 is about the cap I can charge for a special and know it will move. 

 

I looked yesterday, and our salmon is 10 bucks a pound. We're in the very land locked state of Kentucky. Granted, I do not go with the cheapest sources, but the cost is only a buck or two different. 

 

Our 60 ct potatoes are at almost 30 bucks a case. That's up from 22.00  2 weeks ago. That's all we use, so I couldn't tell you any other prices. 

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 

I don't get the prices for rock fish, and I'm baffled by the different names (sea bass, china red, red snapper, etc).

 

I misquoted the halibut, it's about $15 a pound off the bone, skin on. Sounds about the same, Fryguy.

Are you buying farmed salmon, then, crazycookin?

Seems kinda inexpensive for fresh fish.

And you're in AK Chefbuba?  Can't recall...

post #7 of 17

Bubba is right  you are overpaying get 2 or 3 fish mongers put one against the other ,that's how you get good price. Wild Salmon and the farm raised junk are a lot different. Actually if you went to a salmon farm, you would see the salmon are almost white and colored with carrots as feed before slaughter.  Buy your fish whole its cheaper and in most cases fresher. Halibut is expensive here in Florida also. Salmon is not. Sea bass is high, grouper is med price snapper red and yellow tail is med price. Look for fish that are less $ ask the fish guy whats he pushing. Change your fish entree's, based on cost factors and availability. When you process your own fish, save trim, make fish cakes, or boullibase, or other by fish dishes, this brings cost % down on total.  There are many ways

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by left4bread View Post

I don't get the prices for rock fish, and I'm baffled by the different names (sea bass, china red, red snapper, etc).

 

I misquoted the halibut, it's about $15 a pound off the bone, skin on. Sounds about the same, Fryguy.

Are you buying farmed salmon, then, crazycookin?

Seems kinda inexpensive for fresh fish.

And you're in AK Chefbuba?  Can't recall...

 

I'm in your back yard....East side of Snoqualime.....



 

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post


Heya neighbor! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

...if you went to a salmon farm, you would see the salmon are almost white and colored with carrots as feed before slaughter.

I've heard ground shrimp shells are used for color.

 

Who knows for sure; might be puppy blood.
 

 

post #10 of 17

Its possible , but the one I visited used ground carrot pulp. Actually the poor things hit anyfood like sharks on the attack.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #11 of 17

Left4Bread you asked on another post about the salmon from Norway. It was a sample and had no labelling, but I believe it was wild caught. It didn't change color in the cooler, and farm raised will usually lose it's color. I buy Pacific wild caught sockeye salmon, Blue Wave brand. The label on the box say 4-6 oz., but the case has individual packages with two fillets each marked for resale at 16 oz. So they average 8 oz. each. I pay 5.99 lb. for it.  I paid around $7 lb. a couple of weeks ago for some nice trout. There are several kinds of fish around that aren't so expensive. Look for Cape Capensis. This is a very mild flavored fish from Africa. It is a form of hake, but the area where it's from managed to get their species designated with the Cape Capensis name (sort of like Roquefort cheese or burgundy wine). Production of this fish is on the rise, so supplies and price should be stable. Wahoo is another reasonable fish. There's another name for it, but I can't think of it. We sear it on the grill and finish with buerre blanc. Reminds me of mackeral, but milder. It's a thick, meaty fish and can stand up to grilling. Pongasus (catfish from the Me Kong Delta) is good and cheaper than dirt. You should be able to get it for under $3 lb. and people like it. It's not the same as U.S. catfish, but you can see the resemblance. Cook it as you would catfish. After the world economy took a dump, I was buying whole fillet cod from the Royal Greenland company for $2.99 lb. Never happen again. Europe usually buys up all Greenland produces, and if we can get it, we pay through the nose for it  But everybody was broke and I suppose Greenland was unloading it for whatever they could get for it to raise some cash. Never happen again in my lifetime. I bought several cases of it and ran torsk as a special. That fish is processed on the boat and is only frozen once. Fillets when cooked were snow white and velvety. Like cod used to be. Can't buy decent cod now. It's all processed in China and full of chemicals to hold the water in it. Makes it mushy. I'm always dealing with one nightmare or another. Either it's crap cod, scallops smaller than the size designated, walleye runnning out of supply or of inferior quality, on and on.  I actually bought monkfish a couple of months ago for under $9 lb. Had a hard time sellling it though, people around here didn't know what it was and were afraid to try it. Barramundi is another good fish that isn't expensive.

post #12 of 17

Sorry Bread, part of that last post should have been directed to crazycookin. I got confused. Doesn't take much anymore.

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

And that was exactly the things that I wanted to hear.

Thank you.

 

I have to hit the montereybayaquarium.org to see what people will buy.

Customers expect me to be conscientious in these matters.

 

Wahoo, "Ono", is about $9 fresh from Hawaii.  Looks good.  Haven't tried it.  Ordered some Blue Marlin instead.  Expecting swordfish texture/flavor.

 

"Rockfish" is $5 pound right now.  Pretty cheap. 

 

"I buy Pacific wild caught sockeye salmon, Blue Wave brand. The label on the box say 4-6 oz., but the case has individual packages with two fillets each marked for resale at 16 oz. So they average 8 oz. each. I pay 5.99 lb. for it."

 

That's insanely cheap.  That's just not right.  That's stupid cheap.  ...or I'm paying too much.

post #14 of 17

Wahoo, Cobia,Marlin are all fantastic fish.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

The blue marlin was great!

$9/lb fresh loin

 

post #16 of 17

Unfortunatly most American females years ago would only buy white flesh fish and shrimp. Most likely this is what put the local fish store out of business. Freeezing also did not help., and supermarkets  stocking fish hurt them. I used to tell my mom that there was other fish beside her beloved flounder and sole which when I was a kid thought this the only fish people caught. and ate.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 

really?

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