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post #31 of 51

That's why they call blood sausage, black pudding or boudin noir, lol. Depends on your food ethics, I guess.

 

 

Quote:
I had soon dae for lunch.  A lot of people don't realize that soon dae is actually a traditional Luxembourg food, invented by the Brothers Schleck, Andy and Frank.

lol.gifrollsmile.gif

 

 

It's been a while since I've had to (badly) flute a mushroom. Use a hawk's beak knife for that?

post #32 of 51



 

It's been a while since I've had to (badly) flute a mushroom. Use a hawk's beak knife for that?


I used to have to do it A LOT, and, and found a "bec d'oiseau" (probably same knife you're talking about) too much of a PITA to sharpen, so used a sheep's foot parer.  Now, I use a petty.  Like most forms of peeling the trick isn't in the knife, which you hold fairly steady and by the blade, it's in moving the 'shroom.

 

I've never been a fan of small kitchen knives.  Few things have made me as happy as exchanging them for a petty.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/21/11 at 9:01pm
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post #33 of 51

Yah, it was a bec d'oiseau.

 

Hmm, you're supposed to turn the shroom? I think I did it wrong.

post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 

smack in the middle of dinner service last night it hit me...duh..not amontillado sherry but napoleon brandy..double duh! would that be authentically correct bdl, as i still havent seen a recipe other than CB'S..think you and tin are right about the sausages. even though this audience are world travelers, the grilled sausage or brat may suit them better.as always KIS...chris, just curious, does the whole dish take on a purplish color from the sausage being cooked with the apples? thanks again all...

joey


Edited by durangojo - 7/22/11 at 10:27am

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post #35 of 51
post #36 of 51

Here's a copy of Pellaprat's recipe, and another of Mrs. Beeton's.  Beeton's give some evolutionary, non-French context, and some historical (or a-historical) remarks.  In any case, Beeton's is not exactly Pellaprat -- and with wine as an afterthought yet.  Clearly, styles change and there's no reason you shouldn't take the dish and run with it.  Pellaprat was a great modernizer and collector, and am sure he -- or whomever he caged this recipe from -- did.

 

Here's Beeton (ca 1861):

Poulet a La Marengo.

 

INGREDIENTS.— 1 large fowl, 4 tablespoonfuls of salad oil, 1 tablespoonful of flour, 1 pint of stock No. 105, or water, about 20 mushroom-buttons, salt and pepper to taste, 1 teaspoonful of powdered sugar, a very small piece of garlic.

Mode .— Cut the fowl into 8 or 10 pieces; put them with the oil into a stewpan, and brown them over a moderate fire; dredge in the above proportion of flour; when that is browned, pour in the stock or water; let it simmer very slowly for rather more than 1/2 hour, and skim off the fat as it rises to the top; add the mushrooms; season with salt, pepper, garlic, and sugar; take out the fowl, which arrange pyramidically on the dish, with the inferior joints at the bottom. Reduce the sauce by boiling it quickly over the fire, keeping it stirred until sufficiently thick to adhere to the back of a spoon; pour over the fowl, and serve.

Time .— Altogether 50 minutes. Average cost , 3s. 6d.

Sufficient for 3 or 4 persons.

Seasonable at any time.

 

A FOWL À LA MARENGO.— The following is the origin of the well-known dish Poulet à la Marengo:— On the evening of the battle the first consul was very hungry after the agitation of the day, and a fowl was ordered with all expedition. The fowl was procured, but there was no butter at hand, and unluckily none could be found in the neighbourhood. There was oil in abundance, however; and the cook having poured a certain quantity into his skillet, put in the fowl, with a clove of garlic and other seasoning, with a little white wine, the best the country afforded; he then garnished it with mushrooms, and served it up hot. This dish proved the second conquest of the day, as the first consul found it most agreeable to his palate, and expressed his satisfaction. Ever since, a fowl à la Marengo is a favourite dish with all lovers of good cheer.

[I copied this from the University of Adelaide web site, and edited the spacing very slightly before pasting it here]

 

In my opinion, the story is more likely apocryphal than not. 

 

Moving right along into the modern era, here's the Pellaprat recipe (ca 1915):

CHICKEN MARENGO

 

3-1/2 pounds chicken legs and breasts

2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp ground black pepper

flour

1/4 cup olive oil or salad oil

3 tbs butter

1 cup chicken stock

12 small white onions, peeled

1/2 cup sliced green pepper

1 cup well-drained Italian canned tomatoes, or 4 peeled, seeded, and quartered fresh tomatoes

1/2 cup pitted black olives

1/2 tsp ground allspice

1/4 pound sliced mushrooms

1/2 cup dry white wine

 

Rub chicken with 1 tsp of the salt and black pepper.  Dredge in flour.  Brown in 1/4 cup oil and 1 tbs butter.  Add the next 6 ingredients.  Cover and simmer in 45 minutes or until the chicken is tender.  Saute mushrooms in remaining 1 tbs of butter and add to chicken along with wine 5 minutes before cooking time is up.   Adjust .  Serve with rice.  Makes 6 servings.

[Very slightly edited for abbreviations]

 

CF The Great Book of French Cuisine, Henri Paul Pellaprat, Over 2000 recipes by the director of the Ecole de Cordon Bleu, Paris; Vendome Press, 1982; edited by Kramer and White, further adapted for the American kitchen by Day. 

 

N.B.  This and Pellaprat's Modern French Culinary Art are differently titled versions of exactly the same book... sort of.  The French original was L'Art Culinaire Moderne, originally published in 1915 and more or less constantly updated through Pellaprat's lifetime, and even afterward.  Various English editions are more complete than others, and if you're buying a copy, I suggest buying one with the most recipes and illustrations possible -- and not buying the Jeremiah Tower version which was heavily redacted with the idea of losing recipes which weren't sufficiently contemporary.  Too bad, because they not only provide a window into their time but why let Jeremiah make that decision for you?

 

My 1982 book better reflects the late fifties and sixties than the date of publication.  I think that's because the pictures were taken for and from an earlier, 1966 British edition (which I had and lost).  Pellaprat, as much as anyone else, taught me to cook.  But the recipes and presentations (go for the lavishly illustrated!) are stuffy and old fashioned.  Of course you can improvise and evolve.  He most certainly would have.  I'm not sure if I'd change anything here though, except for transubstantiating sliced to fluted.  Maybe cippolinis instead of pearl onions.  Otherwise, what's not to like?

 

I'm not sure, but I think my older book had a Chicken Marengo illustration.  This one, alas, does not.

 

I'm not sure who impressed the importance of fluting the mushrooms on me -- it's certainly not in this edition if it was in Pellaprat at all.  Probably the chef from a joint where I worked in the early seventies, who may have been the most rule-driven cook of all time.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/22/11 at 11:58am
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post #37 of 51

 

 

Quote:
 

 

post #38 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Currywurst is a popular excuse to drink more beer in Germany.  It's way up on their list of snack foods.  Perhaps, as they say in Germany, "numero uno."

 

It's true that any sort of blood sausage might be a little challenging for your audience, and probably best avoided for your gig. But apropos of nothing, I had soon dae for lunch.  A lot of people don't realize that soon dae is actually a traditional Luxembourg food, invented by the Brothers Schleck, Andy and Frank. 

 

Of course you catch a break on fluting the mushrooms.  But just you. Everyone else has to.  Or else.

 

Congratulations on the knife.

BDL


I spent 2 years in Deutschland and I don't recall needing an excuse to drink more beer nor did the locals seem to need it either!  rollsmile.gif

 

And sorry about the above post.  Something went awry!

 

post #39 of 51
Thread Starter 

just received my $3.61 1966 copy of pellaprat's 'FMCA'...no, it's not the jeremiah tower edition...so yes, his chicken marengo recipe calls for sliced mushrooms and his veal marengo recipe calls for whole mushrooms(i'm guessing buttons), to be added near the end, before it goes into the oven. one thing that never really made sense to me about the fluted mushrooms was why would they be fluted just for a stew...of course though, it was Napoleon. i think if i add the buttons i would first lightly saute them in butter and brandy. recipe calls for only white wine which i thought interesting as well, no brandy?...thought the green peppers an odd addition as well...viva la france!...thanks tin and bdl for going 'above and beyond"...really appreciate it!....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #40 of 51

So?  Whaddaya think?  Best cookbook ever for stodgy French dishes? 

 

BDL

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post #41 of 51
Thread Starter 

stodgy perhaps but i am finding the pictures extremely entertaining and interesting..the attention to detail is inspiring in an anal sort of way...food today is so much more freer, creative and colorful...some of pellaprat's pasta and grain dishes look so sickly... for instance the carbonara, i would throw some peas in there or the simple spaghetti with clams could use some fresh basil or italian parsley...our dishes(plates) are more interesting today as well with shapes and colors galore.. he sure did like to make alot of food to look like eyeballs...that stuff always wigs me out a bit...like someone staring at you...you know what they say...'just cuz you're paranoid doesn't mean that someone's not after you!'..anyway, i am enjoying it immensely, thanks for asking.....does make me think about how all the stodgy cooks got to where they are though....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #42 of 51

Don't think the pictures had anything to do with Pellaprat personally.  One of the publishers had them done, the first English publisher "if memory serves."

 

Any particular stodgy cooks in mind?  

 

BDL 

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post #43 of 51
Thread Starter 

no, not exactly...it's just that some people only wear white socks their entire life, while others run barefoot!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #44 of 51

And still others wear pointy-toe cowgirl boots. 

 

Barefoot, me.

 

BDL

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post #45 of 51
Thread Starter 

and proudly, i might add!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

and proudly, i might add!

joey

Yeah, but spurs in the kitchen may lead to misunderstandings ! crazy.gif
 

 

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #47 of 51
Thread Starter 

not for long buckaroo pete....indeed,not for long !..plus spurs are really great for keeping the walk in door from shutting behind you!!!

joey


Edited by durangojo - 8/2/11 at 7:11pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #48 of 51
Thread Starter 

BDL,

it is becoming increasingly clear to me that monsieur henri-paul pellaprat was/is a genius. his recipes which appear simple and straightforward, are just that...the stodgy photos had me fooled at first! the more i read through his recipes(which tells alot about a person), the more i want to know the person, the man himself, the genius that drove him, his life...everything. what a time to be in paris..to work, to train under the best, with the best, in the best...to be the best...wow!...mind blowing really...any reading recommendations? thanks

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #49 of 51

durangojo,

 

Jeremiah's edition has some bio I think.  At any rate whatever there is to know about Pellaprat, Tower knew it.  I think there might be some stuff on the Cordon Bleu website.  If Pellaprat wasn't precisely a "founder," he was not only their most influential teacher but probably had more to do with making it the institutional force it became than anyone else. 

 

You've hit the nail on the head in terms of what he liked and what he liked to teach.  He was one of those great, ingredient-driven simplifiers who come along every so often, drag us all back to first principles, and get everything to make sense.  He's one of my culinary heroes, and probably the biggest influence on my own cooking.  No one markets a spoon engraved with "What Would Pellaprat Do?" But more's the pity.  A lot of us would be better for it.

 

Excuse the gush,

BDL

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post #50 of 51
Thread Starter 

thanks bdl...will definately search the net when i have time....after the weekend most probably....here's a kick in the pants though...the powers that be(the people that pay me) now want an italian buffet...go figure! am a bit disappointed, but oh well, learn and live!...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #51 of 51

Italian buffet, oh well.  Lions and tigers and bears, oh my!

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 8/5/11 at 9:05pm
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