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Feel im getting screwed...

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hows everyone? This is my first thread on here and thanks for the help in advanced!

I have recently moved up from being a line cook to training as a captain in my kitchen (helping out with ordering, scheduling, running inside/outside expo). I got a raise because of it and I am early in my career so I thought that what I was getting seemed fair. Talking to a new line cook who just got hired and is getting 50cents less an hour then me as just a cook... I feel like I'm being takin advantage of here. Not sure how to approach my boss on this one, any ideas? I would like to stay at this restaurant as I feel this job will help me in the long run and look good on a resume, but I could be wrong?

-Kyle

post #2 of 24

Heya!

 

Grats on being good enough for them to spend time in training you to do ordering.

It's not something that I would train just anyone to do.

 

You should probably just be grateful for them spending their time training you.

Consider it an apprenticeship.

 

I've got line cooks practically begging me to teach them how to food cost and whatnot.

I simply don't have the time to do it.

There are classes you can take to learn and PAY for the knowledge...  or you can get paid to learn and be happy that you're getting paid more than that line cook...

 

tldr; they're paying you AND training you. 

Don't look a gift horse in the mouth.

 

post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

Didn't think of it from that point of view, I am happy I got the position and a raise. Thanks for opening my eyes!

post #4 of 24

Do the job till you learn it all. The more you learn the more valuable you are to them . then ask for raise as now they have invested time in you and won't want you to leave

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 24

Hey Pinky,

  As you learn and move up you will understand that anyone worth their weight will never put their business. You should do the same.

If you acted on this, then found out the line cook was blowing smoke up your nose, you would have ruined your shot. The posters before me are talking to you from experience. Follow their lead. Get all the education and experience and then present yourself to ownership as being value added. You'll get greased.

   If you want to stay with this industry PLEASE don't put your business in the street and stay outside the politics!

Good luck to you my friend,

pan

I hope you enjoyed your first postwink.gif

BTW Is the avatar your real looks? I'm might focus on working in the BOHbiggrin.gif

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

Haha yes avatar is my real looks, and my boss still gave me a promotion! Thanks for all the advice, thats why I posted here before I acted on it, I figured someone with a couple years on me might know a thing or two :)

post #7 of 24

Couple of years  ??  You are being nice. Probably between Panini and I you have almost a 100 years.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 24

lol.gif  100 yrs. That's funny, I almost fell off my scooter.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #9 of 24

Don't you mean walker?

tongue.gif

post #10 of 24

Don't worry about the nickels and dimes, learn the job and talk in thousands..............you don't make money in this business going for interviews, you make money when they seek you out......................ChefBillYB

post #11 of 24

You old farts need to realize that it's called  "hoveround" not "a walker"!

Learn your new mode of transportation.

And enjoy it! 

 

[edit]: meant that with all due respect. 

gl with the hoveround and your EZ-grabber.

lol.gif  , also: ;)

 


Edited by left4bread - 7/20/11 at 2:20am
post #12 of 24

we don't need an EZ Grabber with orthopedic lifts in our shoes

 

I should get a 'hoverround'.. tired of the dog chasing the tennis balls on the walker

post #13 of 24

Make fun of us old farts as you say. But anytime you young guys  want to have a quiz on cooking let us know.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #14 of 24

Guess that means I'll have to dust off my cheatsheets on poelet and blanquettes.

post #15 of 24

 

 

Quote:

poelet and blanquettes 

OK,  I'm an old fart. I guess I should know what that is. But I don't have a clueconfused.gif

Unless you're talking about chicken,veal,etc. friccasee. I know that spelling is wrong!!lol.gif Hey ChefEd never mentioned spelling.

 

 

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #16 of 24

You agreed to the wage. It doesn't matter what someone else is getting. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by panini View Post

 

 

OK,  I'm an old fart. I guess I should know what that is. But I don't have a clueconfused.gif

Unless you're talking about chicken,veal,etc. friccasee. I know that spelling is wrong!!lol.gif Hey ChefEd never mentioned spelling.

 

 

That's ok, you're pastry, you don't have to know anything about cooking biggrin.gif
 

Poelet is a very old cooking method. You take a piece of meat, put it on some matingon (fancy mirepoix), drizzle it with butter, and bake it in a covered pot. When the meat is done, you make an integral sauce.

 

Blanquette is kinda like friccasse, but you blanch the meat, then simmer it in a white stock with mirepoix and a bouqet garni. You make then make a sauce out of the stock with white roux and liason or cream.

post #18 of 24

Us hillbilly pastry types call that pot roast

post #19 of 24

Nah, pot roast gets browned before cooking. Also, poelet tends to focus on white meats IIRC.

post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Make fun of us old farts as you say. But anytime you young guys  want to have a quiz on cooking let us know.


That'd be like a senior kicking a freshman's ass in the schoolyard; completely unfair fight, but fun to watch.  lol.gif

 

post #21 of 24

Thetincook 

     Very good definitions. I am impressed.

 Blanquette was lmost always done with veal, and pouling is a cooking procedure. One does not hear of these often in this day and age. Blanquetted is actually almost a light combo saute /poach in white stock and then veloute like finish.

Pouling is done today with a lobster, almost  like when its poached in butter .  For a young kid, you know your onions (as we used to say)

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #22 of 24

Chefedb,

   Whoa! slow down with the accolades. UMM, it just doesn't look that good for us seniors.

Now blanquette de veau is something I learned over there. Not really like friccasee. We sold a lot of orders before the afternoon rest.

It's like a stew. Without digging into my formulas, I can recall we always brought up rice with it. I did brown off the veal with rapeseed oil.

I rember peeling those damn little onions for hrs. I can remember a different spice. We wrapped sprigs and we added cumin or curry.???

TheTincook,

I thank you very much for letting me off the hook because I'm pastry.lol.gif Actually pastry was my back up. I actually made E.Chef of Americana

hotels @ 24. Actually     The AA 191 crash in 79, resulted in many of us out on the street as they sold off properties. I then flipped to the sweet side.

Can you guide me somewhere to read about poelet?

 

BTW  Chefed. TheTinCook writes like he's young, but I'm thinking he's around 65 yrs. oldbiggrin.gif

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #23 of 24

Lol, I'm getting a swelled head here.

 

Thanks Chefedb. The trick I'm having is turning all the bits and pieces knowledge into cooking chops.

 

Poele sounds like a great technique for lobster.

 

I had no idea that American Airlines had their own hotels. That's a pretty wild career.

 

Best reference for the poele that I have on hand is Escoffier's le Guide. He describes two versions. The ancient method, and the 'modern' one he uses. He uses it a lot for beef filet and chickens and other birds. My Larousse is in French, so I haven't checked it yet.

 

BTW I'm only 65 for the discounts. Don't tell AARP.

post #24 of 24

Fridays or Sat.

Always waiting for a seat out. I think we payed the tax. I can't count the number of time I sat in a buddy seat.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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