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American measurement TO metric one please ?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi every one , can any one please tell what is the equivalent of cup  of flour in grams please ? i do find much easier to use the meteric measurement in baking since the american one is bit confusing ( sorry guys)

post #2 of 9

Hi and welcome! Here's a link to a conversion chart that should help you. It's easy!

 

http://www.traditionaloven.com/conversions_of_measures/flour_volume_weight.html

 

What are you making?

 

 

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kboutiche64 View Post

Hi every one , can any one please tell what is the equivalent of cup  of flour in grams please ? i do find much easier to use the meteric measurement in baking since the american one is bit confusing ( sorry guys)

A word of caution: a "cup of flour" is a volume measurement, the equivalent weight WILL vary depending on

  • sifting
  • packing
  • humidity
  • leveling
  • variety
  • fineness

 

and may vary from a low of 4 1/2 ounces (125 grams) to somewhere around5 1/2-6 ounces (156-170 grams).

 

According to King Arthur Flour, 4 1/2 ounces is fairly representative for all-purpose flour in the USA.

 

The ONLY accurate volume/weight conversions are for liquids, any granular material is subject to considerable variation. Best solution? Get a "1 cup measure", fill it with flour, and weigh it on a scale calibrated in grams.

 

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #4 of 9

Never mind,

Chef Pete said all I was writing. The only thing I added was that there is less room for era with small recipes.

You can run into real problems scaling up. If you are off a measure on a small recipe it is only exaggerated as you multiply up.

 

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #5 of 9

Common ingredient weights

1.000 28.34952
Item Measurement Ounces Grams
Almond flour, toasted 1 cup 3.325 95
Amaranth flour 1 cup 3.625 103
Ancient Grains Blend 1 cup 4.625 132
Barley flour 1 cup 4.000 114
Buckwheat flour 1 cup 4.250 121
Chickpea flour 1 cup 3.000 86
Flax flour ½ cup 1.750 50
Harvest Grains Blend ½ cup 2.625 75
Hazelnut flour 1 cup 3.125 89
King Arthur flours      
- Unbleached All-Purpose Flour 1 cup 4.250 121
- Bread flour 1 cup 4.250 121
- Cake flour 1 cup 4.000 114
- Unbleached Cake Flour blend 1 cup 4.250 121
- Gluten-Free multi-purpose 1 cup 5.375 153
- Perfect Pastry Blend 1 cup 4.000 114
- Rice Flour, Brown 1 cup 5.375 153
- Rice Flour, White 1 cup 5.000 142
- Round Table Pastry flour (white) 1 cup 3.750 107
- Tapioca Flour/starch  1 cup 4.000 114
- Whole wheat (traditional) 1 cup 4.000 114
- Whole wheat (white) 1 cup 4.000 114
- Whole wheat pastry 1 cup 3.375 96
Oat flour 1 cup 3.250 93
Rye flours    
Medium Rye 1 cup 3.625 103
Pumpernickel 1 cup 3.750 107
White Rye 1 cup 3.750 107
Semolina 1 cup 5.750 164
Sorghum flour 1 cup 4.875 139
Spelt flour 1 cup 3.500 100
Sugar, granulated white 1 cup 7.000 199
" 23 cup 4.750 135
Sugar, confectioners’, unsifted 2 cups 8.000 227
Sugar, dark or light brown, packed 1 cup 7.500 213
Sugar, demerara 1 cup 7.750 220
Sugar, Sticky Bun 1 cup 3.500 100
Sugar substitute: Splenda 1 cup 0.875 25
Sugar substitute: Clabber Girl Sugar replacer for baking 1 cup 5.000 142
Tapioca flour 1 cup 4.000 114
Teff flour 1 cup 4.750 135

 

Adapted from the King Arthur Website

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

thanks guys, that wasvery helpfull, i work for manchester college ( uk) the students love cakes, i have made biscotti recently they want more of it , what is best to use is it melted butter or oil in making biscotti ?

post #7 of 9

Many thanks for the specifics, PeteMcCracken!

post #8 of 9

I slightly disagree with the idea that because flour volume varies you cannot convert it to weight.

 

Technically, that's true. But you have to start somewhere.

 

In American terms, for instance, most baking authorities use 4.5 ounces as the weight of a cup of white wheat flour. If you volume measure, will that vary? You betcha! But, in practical terms, if you use 4.5 ounces all the time you will have a consistent measurement. If a specific recipe needs adjusting, then you can always adjust. But that's true of any formula.

 

If the 4.5 ounce conversion consistently leads to the same problem, than adjust the base conversion. That is, for instance, if, while using 4.5 ounces, your dough consistently needs more liquid, then change your base weight to, say, 5 ounces. After that, you know that with the flour you use, if you have a volume-measurement recipe, to convert it to 5 ounces per cup.

 

So, in this specific case, take 4.5 ounces and convert it. There are 28.5 grams to an ounce. Multiply by 4.5 and you get 128.25 grams.

 

If you are off a measure on a small recipe it is only exaggerated as you multiply up.

 

This, too, is very true. But, maybe, more in theory than reality. In practical terms, if there is such an error, you correct after the first batch. And then there's no longer an error.

 

Let's not forget, too, that day-to-day differences in the flour's moisture content can have a major effect, and the dough may require more or less moisture added. I've never done big batches. But with small batches---up to six loaves of bread at a time---the day-to-day adjustments have varied more widely than any weight conversion errors.

 

In all cases, knowing what a good dough looks and feels like is better than blindly following any recipe or formula.

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

I slightly disagree with the idea that because flour volume varies you cannot convert it to weight...

My apologies, I was simply trying to point out that the volume/weight conversion will vary with the specific product being measured as well as the technique of the person doing the measurement.

 

I convert volume to weight very often, especially with flours. However, I do not use any standard conversion, I use my own conversion, one that I've created from repeated trials weighing a known volume of flour in various states from "out of the bag" to fully sifted before measuring.

 

As KYH states, "adjust your conversion" to match conditions. Even if you measure the weight of 100 separate "cups of flour" and use the average, the next cup will probably weight more, or even less.crazy.gif
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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