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Two Questions in One

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
Does anyone still do Intermizzo?

If yes, is it the Pastry Chefs job?

Also, How do the pastry people feel about combining savory ingredients with there sweet bases for sorbets?

Example;
Pineapple with tarragon and red peppercorns (crushed)
saffron and honey..ETC.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #2 of 27
I would say yes, that the pastry chef should do the intermezzo, or at least as a collaborative effort with the chef. I haven't done them in years, but I've seen 'em in recent years while dining in some restaurants.

Savory should be part of the intermezzo (herbs, etc.), and I also like some of the sweeter savories, such as cucumber, tomato, anise, etc, because of their neutrality and cleansing qualities.

Your pineapple intermezzo sounds refreshing...:lips:

Come to think of it, you only hear of sorbets as intermezzos, but has anyone seen other preparations used the same way(to cleanse the palate)?
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Hmmmm,

Momo,

I'm sitting here trying to think of what iv'e seen done other than ices, sorbets and gratines for intermezzo.

I have to think about this one.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #4 of 27

Inter what??

Ok, I wasnt gonna ask but the dictionary didnt tell me much. What in the world is an "Intermezzo". All the dictionary said was: Music and I cant see anyone eating music. :confused:
Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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Jodi


I don't know about you but I think I need a nap.
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post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 

That's cute

Intermezzo is a palete cleanser served between usaully the third and fourth course of a formal meal. Most of the time when you are going from seafood to meat.

Like said before by Momoreg, it is almost always a sorbet, not a sherbert like served at Freindlys restaurant :) but less sweet and balanced with acid and sweetness and savory.

Intermezzo basiclly means Intermission, give your palete a stretch so to speak.
cc
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #6 of 27
like the lime between the taquila and salt?

whoops,


how about a warm infusion or tea course in place of the sorbet? the same principals could be applied, lime with cardamon and saffron, but warm. tiny sake like cup.

fruit jelly lemon verbena.

or

poached citrus zest, not quite candy.



:bounce:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
M Brown,

I absolutly love your humor.

The lime in between the Agave and salt sounds perfect about now.

You have peeked my curiousity.

I have always thought that temperture plays a very important role in the effectiveness of a intermezzo.

Cold, elevates, stimulates and cleanses the palate. as something warm in this situation may work in reverse.

Michel, I am playing the devils advocate here.
Does this make sense?

BTW...pass the lime.:bounce: :p
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #8 of 27
IMO This is a very important part of any meal. It is starting to arrive back on the scene here. To my dislike, the chefs are going way to right. An intermezzo IMO really should be a cleansing and neutralizing to prepare for the next course. I have usually developed mine with a little yin and yang philo. The last few I have had have been way to overpowering, adding flavor instead of infusing. Last week we had a nice one after scallops w/creme sauce, it was ruby red grapefruit w/a hint of tequilla sorbet. the chef put this in the middle of a quinelle of blood orange gratinee and sprinkled w/pink peppercorn.
I have use sorbets,chilled consumees, and such.
Great topic.
Usually pastry chefs task.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #9 of 27
Think I'd rather have a backrub between the releve and the entree, if I could.
It's not Dairy Queen.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #10 of 27
TBH: Oh, you meant as the dinner guest! At first I thought you meant being the cook! (Wouldn't we all like that!?!?)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #11 of 27
I am with panini on that. I find it very very important in a dinner and I am looking forward to your ideas.

Cape Chef,mbrown I have never thought that an intermezzo could be hot!! Especially tea...:cool:

But TBH you may have your back rubbed while you are enjoying your intermezzo!!


Great topic BTW
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #12 of 27
to remove the remains of cocoa butter from the mouth during a chocolate tasting it is suggested you drink warm water.
why does the intermezzo have to be cold, just to save stove or oven space by having a cold course?
to cleanse the palate why not warm to remove fats, oils?

this is fun.

back rub would be nice too.;)
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
Dear M.Brown,
I understand your point about drinking warm water at a chocolate tasting,
(Although I would prefere 77 Fonseca).

This differene here is that the water is a neutral ingredient that imparts no distinct flavor
Change in the chocolate, but as you said..It melts the cocoa butter off your tongue.
In addition, you are going from one style chocolate to another, instead of one distinct flavor profile
Into another (as in a meal).

When I go to, or conduct wine tastings, I follow your format in regards to palete cleansing.
Water and sliced bagguette is all you need to move from one wine to another.

Except; of course if you are trying to show the chemical and physical changes that occur during eating certain foods with wine.

The chilled aspect of an Intermezzo achieves palate cleansing by a balance of acid to sweetness and temperture. The acid cleanses the pores in your toungue, while the sugar and coldness kind of tickle your toungue and get it juiced up for the next course.

I think the concept is not so much as actually “Cleaning your mouth” as it is to stimulate your taste buds.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #14 of 27
what about tart fruit gels or lightly candied zests?

as far as the warm mezzo, how about a tepid one?
could happen.

:lips:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #15 of 27
As long as the intermezzo police don't find out, why not?
post #16 of 27
I was in Savannah, GA a few years back and had a tiny, little herb salad served as an intermezzo. It must of contained 10-15 different herbs and greens. My first thought was "How in the world is this going to cleanse my palate and stimulate my apettite?" I was completely amazed. All the herbs were very subtle and played against each other well. By the time I was finished, my palate had been refreshed and the herbs, stimulated my apettite again. I have tried to re-create this salad, but as of yet, no luck.
post #17 of 27
I was thinking last night, that a warm citrus infusion might be a perfect stimulant too, maybe with some crushed mint or cilantro.
post #18 of 27
Momo, you might be on to something. Maybe even blood temp.
You know I grew up in an Italian household,DAH, and I can remember it was kind of a ceremony to gather around the large shelf of different colored bottles of aperitif's. Supposedly they were to stimulate our appetites before a meal. We always had these are toom temp. Just a thought. Actually I think stimulate is the key word here(one hour of listening to my Aunt Carmella)?????:D
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #19 of 27
Personally I think it should be the Chefs responsibility. Why you ask? Because!:bounce:
Seriously what I don't think most people realize is that the pastry chef has a LOT more to do than just desserts. Depending on the operation there's Tea items, breakfast items etc. All the rolls and breads for the dining room come from there. If you are running mini pizzas who makes the dough? If you are making Couilbiac, who makes the pastry? Anything involving dough comes from the pastry chef on top of all the other work they have to do. I think the chef should have their own ice cream makers and make their own infusions etc and pour it into the little bugger, turn it on and come back later for it and leave the pastry department out of it. Sorry Brad:D
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 

Sorry Brad????

Please my Dear hocky indused pastry powerhouse!!!

I have no problem with the savory side of the Kitchen doing the bases for intermezzo, actually..I enjoy making these tasty buggers!!!

Besides I get nuts when My Pastry chef complains of more responsability:D (kidding Micheal)

This was my point to my question, to see whom should be doing it, and if chefs and pastry chefs still think intermezzo is a viable course in a meal.

Hey, Panini..I'm Jewish, but I think I had an Aunt Camellia to

:p
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #21 of 27

great topic

what a great topic -- i was with ShawtyCat on this one --- Inter what???

love it when I learn something new!
post #22 of 27
Glad to see you write that Chrose, I'm with you on this one! I guess it depends upon what's happening or what kind of operation your talking about. In clubs...the pastry dept. is usually one person running their butt off while the 10 guys on the hot side are complaining about when their quiche shells and gougere will be ready. Last thing your pastry chef needs is another responsiblity...I say it's perfect for your sous (teach them both sides).

As a pastry chef, it would be very interesting...but it depends on the situation.

Viable...only in very fine dinning places.
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
As always,

I appreciate your insight Wendy.

maybe to start another thread to talk about. Do you honestly think with the way the economy is going in our industry that there are 10 cooks hanging around the stoves worrying about there quiche shells while the pastry chef is the only one working in the kitchen?

Perhaps another rant thread:D
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #24 of 27
Ahhhhh yes u know those 18 hour days are going to come back soon Cape Chef. And as far as the intermezzo supposedly means "gift from Chef" there for i agree with cape here the pastry guys shouldn't have anything to do with it only The Chef.:cool:
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post #25 of 27
Why not rotate it around? Allow all your cooks to become involved. Assign a cook and/or pastry cook to come up with the intermezzo each day of the week. Two days before their turn they must turn in a recipe to the chef for approval. You can even take it a step further, and make the line cooks come up with something pastry oriented and the pastry cooks to come up with something savory oriented. It gives them all a chance to become involved in menu planning, and forces them to expand their horizons by getting involved in an area that they normally wouldn't.
post #26 of 27
What I was trying to say (ever so poorly as usual) was brought out in Petes post. I like the idea of cross over alot! In my experiences I thought the pastry dept. did alot of cross over into the hot side and think we respond and play off the hot side completely.
In return it seems to me that the hot side really has very little interaction with the sweet side (other then the chef). Line guys would get very nervous and uncomfortable when asked to do anything (including slicing a cake) sweet.
But you know how important cross over is to the overall presentaion from a kitchen. The cross over has to come to the people ready for it, ready for more knowledge. I like to see the sous be the laison between the two sides personally...(assuming the chef is attending to more important items). Lets the sous grow in many ways.
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #27 of 27
I'm on the other side one this one. As far back as I can remember this was the job of the pastry chef. On few occassions I can remember Garde Manager helping. Ice creams, sorbets, frozen items should come from the pastry shop. I may be selfish, but I like to have as many courses as possible. Its good ammunition for hitting the chef up for more labor hours. If your guests understand intermezzo than more than likely they know it usually come from the sweet side. I don't know if I would be comfortable with it coming from the hot line. Don't misinterpret, I firmly believe in cross training. Just my 2 cents.
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