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Having second thoughts about a job possibility.

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Right now I'm just a line cook. While I have the most seniority in most of my shifts, and it's in another cooks best interests to listen to me, I'm nobody's boss and they don't, ultimately have to listen to me. So really, I'm not sure if I'm ready for any position of authority. But as a chef I never say "no" to new tasks or responsibilities. If something is required of me, i get it done with the best result I can do.  If a catering client asks "can you make this?" the answer is always "Yes!" I am resourceful. I will do research, experimenting, and ultimately have an excellent product ready for ready for the given dead line.

 

There's an Italian restaurant near me that I'm informed is "desperate" for a new chef.  One of those places that had "it's day" but is not expected to collapse under the weight of the failing economy at any moment. I'm interviewing for the position and I'm not sure if I want it even if I get it.  I've eaten there before, and I was NOT the least impressed.  I ordered capellini with mushrooms. What I got was pasta poorly drained and sitting in a puddle of water; tomato sauce lazily ladled over the top; and then some unsauteed, canned mushrooms just kind of plopped on top.  Their "home made" meat ravioli was VERY bland.  Their menu is exactly 50 items long.  It's really an American grill that also serves pasta and pizza.  And I don't know how seriously I can take an "Italian restaurant" that serves Chicken Tarriyaki and breaded chicken fingers.  I won't sit here and talk like i've never worked in an italian restaurant that served breaded chicken aka Chicken Milanese, but don't you dare try to sell me bought-in, frozen pre-breaded chicken tenders or anything covered in Kikkoman brand sauces and try to charge me $10 for it!  Even though I'm interviewing for a chef position, I get the idea that this is a place that does not allow their chef to make creative changes.  Even if they did, we're talking about a community in decline.  Their remaining clientele are the senior citizens who probably only come because of the specials or coupon offers. I'm not sure the community it belongs to would embrace change.  

 

Anyone who knows me a little from my posts in the forums probably knows that my passion is really French cuisine.  And though I have most of my restaurant experience working in Italian restaurants and pizzerias; it's due only because i took whatever job my inexperienced butt could get to make my bones in the industry.  Maybe my attitude is poor, but I'd like more opinions.  


Edited by pcieluck - 7/22/11 at 10:32pm
post #2 of 3

LOL. Crack Me Up! 

 

I know and love Italian foods. I don't know anything about French anything, other than French-fries. Tomorrow I'm going to work at a ** French place. 

 

Good Luck with whatever you do. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #3 of 3

I would do some serious due diligence before taking any offer from that place. Sounds like it could be a real loser of a proposition.

 

1) If you don't have any management experience (sous chef/shift leader or higher) do you at least have management tools at your disposal? You'll need to be comfortable with the financial aspects of the kitchen, training and HR, purchasing, and more stuff.

 

2) You'll need good people handling skills. a) to deal with the public since you've gotta rebuild the customer base, b) deal with employees, morale and carelessness will be the big problems, and most importantly c) to deal with the owners and management. I suspect that you will have the most problems with the owners/management.  Since they are running a failing restaurant, the odds that they are highly idiosyncratic go way up. This worries me: "I get the idea that this is a place that does not allow their chef to make creative changes." Are they looking for a guy to head a turn around or just a caretaker?

 

Don't knock the seniors, they are like an extra turn.

 

I think the bottom line depends on where you are in life. If you're relatively young with little or no responsibilities, you can take a flier. I'd probably do it. It's a different story if you've got a mortgage or kids.

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