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Curry Goat or Chicken Recipe

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Here is the basic recipe that is used. We always deviate from though either adding more or taking something away.

Curry Goat/Chicken

Cut up 2 lbs. mutton or chicken into small cubes. Place in a large bowl. Add 1 crushed clove of garlic, 2 tomatoes, 2 onions 1 stalk of scallion, 1 hot pepper chopped, then 3 tablespoons curry, salt and pepper to taste. Mix all together. Allow to rest for 1/2 hr. Separate meat from seasoning. Fry meat in 2 tablespoons of butter, 2 fluid ozs. oil until brown. Add seasoning and 2-3 cups of water. Cover and simmer until tender. Serve with rice or roti (Indian flat bread).

Forgot to add that "seasoning" would be a separate recipe that Id have to post. It is made differently by everyone and every country.
Jodi


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post #2 of 23
May one use Indian curry powder, or must one use West Indian, such as "Blue Mountain Country" brand from Jamaica? And do you have a recipe for making roti? One of my favorite lunches was goat roti bought from a cart in my neighborhood. Unfortunately, both that cart and the other Jamaican restaurants nearby have closed, so I've got to learn to make my own. Any hints on the roti? What is that stuff in the middle of it? Also, there was potato or some other chunky starchy veg in the ones I used to buy. Any suggestions? Thanks so much!
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
You can use this stuff as a filling for the Roti, that's what we do. As for the curry powder, Ill give you a hint, all west indians shop at the asian market. The asian market carries all the foods and veggies that are familar to us that we cannot get from the supermarket. Although Pathmark is catering to us immigrants now. :)

I use Ecaf Curry Powder or Indianhead (the one with the indian in the headdress) but you can use whatever curry powder you want. My grandma uses what ever is on hand. We dont hold strict to recipes like Americans seem to do. In fact we really dont write anything down. We use potatoes as the chunky starchy veg Im not sure if other people use something else. I think someone posted a recipe for Roti on the board last year. Ill look for you and be right back.

Jodi
Jodi


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post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

Roti

Here is a link to the Roti Recipe

Saroj's Cookbook

Info about Roti & the Caribbean
Jodi


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Jodi


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post #5 of 23
This type of food is heavenly. Thanks for the Roti recipe, but you haven't mentioned what is the stuff in the middle of it that Suzanne was referring to. I know what she means although I wouldn't be able to describe it...

I also use Indianhead Jamaican curry powder.

BTW, I use a knife and fork. :eek:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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post #6 of 23
Yes, thanks for the info and the roti recipe. The roti I'm used to is flaky and sort of layered. The "stuff in the middle" that I meant is inside the roti, between the layers of the bread -- as if two disks of dough were fitted together with this grainy stuff in between. It's been like that here in NYC and in Florida.

BTW: I thought this was just Trini food; is it more widespread throughout the Caribbean than that?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

JUST TRINI FOOD!!! ACK!

Roti is Caribbean food! There are Indians (from India) everywhere throughout the West Indies. Every country serves their version of Roti. Just like we, west indians that is, speak the same language (broken english with some african/indian/spanish words) we speak different dialects. That's how I can distinguish between different caribbean countries. Sometimes.

The curry goat/chicken/beef recipe is what we Bajans use to fill our Roti. I don't know what the other countries use but Im sure that their recipes are different to mine. Here is an example: Jamacians seem to use coconut milk in their Rice & Peas. In fact, their Rice & Peas is actually Rice & Kidney Beans most of the time. We Bajans lean more towards Rice & Pigeon Peas. Its the same basic recipe, just with different twists to it to reflect the culture. That's all. If you really look at our food, music and language, you will realize that even the Spanish countries are similar to the rest of the West Indies.

Plus, the other European & Asian nations that have settled in our country integrate their dishes with ours. We have our own version of Haggis, empanadas (sp?) etc. Our "rich & expensive" house look like Pagodas sometimes because of the Asian influence. And that is why the West Indies is often called "The Melting Pot" of the world. Sorry NY.

Ok, enough history and culture lessons before you guys beat me up. :blush:

Jodi

PS
Kimmie

You eat the Roti any way you feel comfortable. They usually sell it wrapped in waxed paper around the bottom in BIM (Barbados) so as to minimize the mess. Ill do some research on which Roti recipe you are talking about and post it later.
Jodi


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post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 

Veggie Roti Maybe??

You may be getting a vegetarian Roti made of only Curried Potatoes.

Trini & Tobago Rotis

Plus we have to remember that most Indians use Garam Masala (toasted spices) to start their curries.

Potato Curry Recipe

Let me know if this is it.

Jodi
Jodi


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Jodi


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post #9 of 23

Thanks for all the info!

I am more than happy to defer to someone who knows what's authentic! Beat you up??? NO WAY!!!!! Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!!! I'm printing off the roti recipes even as I type this! Keep it coming, PLEASE!

If Island Flava is still lurking around here, we'd love to hear what you have to say.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #10 of 23

What's in the middle of the roti

I was cleaning up my food clippings files today and FOUND IT: Yellow Peas Roti. After you roll out the dough, you spread it with cooked, spiced yellow split peas. Then you fold it in half, roll it into a circle again, and bake it. So the pea filling makes a sort of grainy layer itself between the flaky layers of bread.

Then you can fill it with the curry or whatever and fold it up to eat.

If anyone is interested (Kimmie?), I'll post the recipe. It was in the NY Times special "Style and Entertaining" section of November 5, 2000.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #11 of 23
Thread Starter 

OW!

My mom smacked me in the back of the head for not remembering. She said, and I quote, "Have you been paying attention to anything Ive been showing you!" So sorry for not remembering that one. :(
Jodi


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Jodi


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post #12 of 23

I feel your pain

Well, I didn't describe it very clearly at the beginning, so don't feel bad. (Wasn't a REAL smack, I hope!)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
West Indian moms and Spanish moms are the same. I can take the smack. The lecture I could do without. :rolleyes: Can you believe that Im 24 and a mom of almost 3 and Im still a kid to her? :crazy:
Jodi


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Jodi


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post #14 of 23
Shawty, darlin, you will ALWAYS be a kid to your mother!!!!!!!

Love your posts re West Indian food - I think so often we 'northerners' get a rather mish-mashed idea of the Caribbean, and forget all the cultures that had blended to make this a true multi-national part of the world!


I'm more familiar with the Hawaiian melting pot, and all the cuisines that have blended in those islands; for Easter, I bought some 'Hawaiian dinner rolls' at the local store - tasted very suspiciously like Portuguese sweet bread, til I remembered that the Portuguese settled heavily in Hawaii!!!

We are truly becoming one world!!!!
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post #15 of 23

THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

ShawtyCat for the recipes and Suzanne for your persistence.

YES Suzanne, I would appreciate the recipe. That's just what I was looking for. Would you post it at your convenience please?

and Cat, you will remain your mom's kid forever...


:bounce:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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post #16 of 23
I tried to locate the recipe on their website to no avail. I hope you didn't lose your newly found clipping! :rolleyes:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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post #17 of 23
Lose a recipe? MOI?? No, sorry, I just ran out of time yesterday. But here it is now:

Yellow Peas Roti from the NY Times "Style & Entertaining" November 5, 2000

FOR THE FILLING:
1 package (1 pound) dried yellow split peas
4 jalapenos or other chili peppers, seeded and minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin, or to taste
Salt and pepper to taste

FOR THE ROTI:
6 cups all-purpose flour
1 Tablespoon baking ppowder
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 to 1 1/2 cups water
Corn oil for brushing.

[list=1][*]For the filling: in a medium saucepan, bring 2 quarts water to a boil, add the split peas and simmer over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, about 20 minutes. Drain and puree, in batches, in a food processor. Place in a large bowl, add chilies, garlic, cumin, salt and pepper. Mix well and set aside.[*]For the roti: preheat oven to 450 degrees. In a large bowl, combine the flour, baking powder and salt. Stir in enough water to make a soft but not sticky dough. Place dough on lightly floured work surface and knead briefly. Cut into 12 pieces and shape each into a ball. For each roti, roll out 1 ball of dough to a 10-inch round. Spread with a heaping tablespoon of the pea filling and fold in half. Roll out again to a 10-inch round, brush top with corn oil and place oiled side down on a cast-iron griddle. Bake until lightly browned on bottom, about 2 minutes. Brush with oil, turn over and bake until lightly browned on bottom. Place on a paper towel and keep warm while making remaining rotis.[/list=1]
Yield: 12 rotis

My note: I'm not clear about the use of the oven for this; if you're keeping the rotis hot in the oven, why have it up that high?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #18 of 23

My turn for a head-smack!

I just looked back at the recipes I printed off from one of ShawtyCat's links (Trini & Tobago Rotis ) and saw the one for "Dhalpouri Roti" which is another version of what I was looking for. Oops!

Of course, the upside is that now we have 2 versions to try!!;)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #19 of 23
Thanks a million Suzanne! :D

BTW, I understand from your recipe that the roti is baked!

Also, can you find Carib beer easily in NYC? It's widely available here and great with this!
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #20 of 23
I think they mean "baking" on the griddle, rather than in the oven. Kind of the same way you "bake" scones on a griddle. As far as I could tell, the oven is just to keep them hot as you cook them individually.

Red Stripe is very easy to get, even in my closest supermarkets which have the smallest selection of products in the world (and the highest prices).:( But it's not that hard to get just about any brand of beer, if you know where to look.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #21 of 23
If that's the case, then I don't understand why the oven would be at 450 just to keep them warm.

Seems to me that baking would be kind of impractical. I would not use the oven at all at that point and keep the roti warm in a towel, placed into an insulated container.
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
post #22 of 23

Just because it was printed ...

even in the vaunted NY Times, doesn't mean it was well-written or thoroughly tested. That's why I'm starting to look for work doing that kind of stuff! (they need me!!!!!)

Yeah, if I were using the oven at all, I'd set it as low as possible, and wrap the roti well before putting them in it. But it looks as though the rest of the recipe should work.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #23 of 23
I agree Suzanne. I must admit that I much prefer the technique used in the Dhalpouri Roti. But I like the ingredients used in the NYTimes! :lips:
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
Reply
K

«Money talks. Chocolate sings. Beautifully.»
«Just Give Me Chocolate and Nobody Gets Hurt.»
«Coffee, Chocolate, Men ... Some things are just better rich.»
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