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Cheesecake - to bake or not to bake?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hello :)

 

I am experimenting with making fondant cake these days and I am always looking for something to put in the middle (to make it more of a dessert and less caky (dry, can be eaten by hand, that kinda thing). I wanted to ask if anyone have tried using cheesecake as "filling" ? the deal would be; cake (5 cm) cheesecake/filling (3-4 cm) cake (2 - 3 cm) + buttercream and fondant. I biult a sort of moat of cake around the fillng so that the cake does not fall and spill.

 

I am pretty sure it can be done, but this leads me to my actual question: I have seen a couple of different takes on the cheesecake on youtube and some of them are baked, some of them are not. They come out looking somewhat simular but what is the difference? is the baked one perhaps more durable? is the non-baked one perheps better tasting?

 

thanks : D

post #2 of 12

Other than the cream cheese taste, they're very different things.  Refrigerator cheesecakes (i.e., non-baked) are a sort of mousse, while baked are stiff custards.  It's all about the eggs.

 

Obviously, baking the sponge and cheesecake in a single pan is an outstandingly bad idea.

 

The best way to combine a cheesecake with any sort of sponge is to bake them separately, and assemble.  Frosting covers a multitude of sins.  Inspired by a thread on CT, I tried a few compound cakes and thought they were pretty good.  But I've never frosted a cheesecake/sponge with a fondant, and can't say I find the idea of fondant with cheesecake very appealing.  My own first choice is a simple whipped cream -- made and frosted as close to service as possible.

 

BDL

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

oh sorry if it looked like I wanted to bake it in the same go :) of cause I was going to bake the components separately :) that makes building a dam around the filling a lot easier too ;)

 

yes I could fill it with whipped cream or the likes, but I’d really much rather fill it with something delicious such as cream cheese icing, cheesecake, mousse and things like that. Also, serving thin sponge + whipped cream + thin sponge (3 or 4 layers) iced in whipped cream with flags and candles is a traditional birthday cake in Denmark and it wouldn’t work for this occasion, which is my sisters bachelorette party.

 

the fondant would be on top of the sponge and a crumb coat so I think it would be ok. Can't imagine what would happen if the fondant were to touch the cheese so i think I am going to avoid that completely : )

post #4 of 12

We're apparently a bit at cross purposes.

 

Glad you meant an assemblage.  I went down the other road before trying to convince someone she couldn't bake a "red velvet cheesecake" in one pan.  Funny thing, her cake ultimately was a big hit.  You can probably dig up the thread if you want.

 

I was suggesting a sponge / cheesecake / sponge sandwich -- or simply sponge over cheesecake -- with a whipped cream outer frosting -- no whipped cream filling.  With the cheesecake, I don't see you needing any other filling at all, except perhaps jam, preserves or marmalade to help seal the sponge.

 

I fear a fondant, poured or rolled, might be a bit too much of an odd texture combined with a cheesecake center.  But late me hasten to add that I'm certainly not a pastry chef or even that good of a baker and can be unimaginative. 

 

Considering the occasion, it might be slyly naughty to go "tart," and citrus.

 

BDL

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

I totally see what you are getting at, but where I am noone likes fondant anyway (and those who do, can't get enough and eat it cake or no cake) so they always peal it off (so do I crazy.gif) its just that I got strict orders to make a mans torso with raspberry/chocolate filling so you are right but unfortunatly I cannot take your advice :(

 

I think I will dig up that post, it sounds like a fun read :P

post #6 of 12

Hi lokken..

 

I've made something similar..  2 layers of baked cheesecake with 2 layers of red velvet.. and covered with cream cheese frosting (between the layers also).  I received positive reviews from those who had it.

 

red-vel-ck.jpg

 

Rob

Don't forget to feed the pig...

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Don't forget to feed the pig...

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post #7 of 12

Ouaou!

Looks very good! Thanks for the tips, will try this one soon!

 

Catering london

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

wow that was almost exactly the idea : D looks great and very doable! how was it to cut?

post #9 of 12

Two totally different desserts. No bake to me is fast food, my daughter could make one when she was 9 years old. Baked one requires  some baking expertiese. Fondant to heavy and to sweet for my taste.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

have some faith in your 9 year old, she can bake, she just needs to try :D I know this because my mum taught us to cook from a very young age... and sow and dance and you know... woman stuff. I appreciate your comment though, I thiink I need to try making both and then decide :)

post #11 of 12

Hi lokken..

 

No stress to cut.. the cheesecakes used were new york cheesecake, which is a firm cake.

Don't forget to feed the pig...

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Don't forget to feed the pig...

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post #12 of 12

In my opinion the baked cheesecake is more authentic and tastes better. To reply to your question on the filling for your fondant cake, I simply use butter cream in between the layers. One thing though , don't roll the fondant too thick. Most people don't eat it as its too sweet and you'll just loose on the cost of the extra fondant. But, have you ever tried martzipan? (almond paste)

I recently made a birthday cake for my son and rolled the martzipan and placed it over the cake. I also used a layer on the filling over the butter cream.It was amazing. I put a big brown ribbon around the cake and spelled birthday wishes in chocolate butter cream on the top of the cake on the layer of martzipan....it was a real hit.

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