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The Best Advice to give a new Chef to be! Anyone?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hello Professional Chefs out there, I've been in culinary school for just about a year now and enjoy it greatly. Just wondering during all my studies, homework and etc. What is the best thing to do as a new chef, besides practice on skills and reading? Or if there are any skills and or readings I should be aware of that would be greatly appreciate that as well. Thanks bounce.gif

post #2 of 17

Networking and people skills. That's how you'll get the good jobs and promotions. Pro cooking is fundamentally a team effort, so you're going to need people and leadership skills if you're going to be successfully at it.

post #3 of 17

What TheTinCook said plus, remember, a chef is the title of the one who runs the kitchen and there is only one, the rest are cooks with varying responsibilities.

 

And graduating from culinary school does not confer the title of chef on anyone! At best, you might be regarded as a culinarian.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

What TheTinCook said plus, remember, a chef is the title of the one who runs the kitchen and there is only one, the rest are cooks with varying responsibilities.

 

And graduating from culinary school does not confer the title of chef on anyone! At best, you might be regarded as a culinarian.

What Pete said
 

 

post #5 of 17

What both fellows above said . but may I add you must love it and want to do it. Remember it is not a job it is a life, so be prepared for it..  Strive for quality and consistancy all the time. And on the way up, be nice to everyone, earn their respect and give respect. Remember ,You are only as good as your crew.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 17

 101: Love it, your career is part of your family.

 

 102: Balance your time, so you can enjoy both.

 

 103: Work at as many Restaurants as possible in the early years, don't worry about how much time you spend in any of them, learn, learn, learn. You will learn something from every operation, even if it's what not to do.

 

 104: Be the kind of person that (in the early years) shows up early for their shift, works hard, go the extra mile. You are building a career, not just working a job.

 

 105:Be a Chef people want to work with,teach, have patients, remember you were once in their shoes.

 

 106: Hire people with heart, character, and good work ethic, you can teach anyone how to cook.

 

  107: I advanced more in this business with my personality and customer service than I ever did with my Culinary skills. Your not a Bullshi-ter if you follow through and do it.

 

  108: Don't over stay your welcome, always leave a Restaurant in good terms, this isn't easy to do but everyone goes into a job thinking it's a life time deal, most only last a year or two. Leave at the top of your game

 

 109: Leave every Restaurant better than you found it.

 

 110: You can never negotiate a good salary if you call them for a position, be good enough at what you do that they seek you out. Then, and only then, you can name your price and set the conditions of your contract.

 

 111: Love what you do, let it show to your customers and employees, once you make it a job it will take it's toll on you and your family.

 

 112: You are a Chef when you call yourself a Chef, it doesn't come easy or fast, it happens when you are ready and have the knowledge to accept all the responsibilities of the position, a Chefs coat, doesn't make you a Chef.

 

113: It doesn't make you a good Chef by working long hours, you are a good Chef by working smart hours, be there when you must. I hear many Chef's say, I worked 70 or 80 hrs last week, that's not managing a kitchen, that's the kitchen is managing you.

 

 

Good luck...................ChefBillyB............

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by ChefBillyB - 7/25/11 at 9:54am
post #7 of 17

Strive to keep your creative juices flowing. It's called Culinary Arts for a reason. Find ways to express yourself artistically.

 

There has been some wonderful advice given here. Follow it.

 

And remember, as a chef, you have put yourself in a servant leader position. Meaning that you are a leader, however, you lead by serving others. Do it with integrity, kindness and love for your workmates as well as your clients. A screaming chef can accomplish much, however a kind chef can accomplish anything.

 

Be Blessed and Have Fun!

post #8 of 17

Dont overlook the experience you can gain from working in a "whole in the wall" type establishment.  I worked in one for 3months one summer and it was the best job I had for some time.  We made everything from scratch every day.  VERY labor intensive but I learned about speed and effieciency there as well as how to do it right the first time.  It was me, another cook and the owner, thats it and we worked from 10AM to close 6 days a week but I made a life long friend who I still speak to on occasion and look to for advice from time to time. 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #9 of 17

try to build a god range of experiances - fro sure work where you can learn the most - GO TO FRANCE, globally it is still very very revelent

 

Work around the world - if you want to learn about chinese food, go to china -

 

cheers 

post #10 of 17

My best advise is something i tell everyone starting in any career.... Listen more than you talk.... Again, Listen More than you talk. Not much will get you hated faster than having someone try and teach you something and responding with "yeah, I know" or "that's not what they taught us" Listen more than you talk....

 

Next thing is to find your culinary Point Of View[POV] and learn as much as you can about it while you are working and work towards focusing on that POV. If you can't find a job that fits with that POV, keep reading, practicing, and learning. Use every tool in your box to find a job that can help you stay on track.

post #11 of 17

Always wear clean underwear. That way, in case there's an accident, you don't scare the nurses. 

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flattop View Post



What Pete said
 

 

What Flattlop said.
 

 

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

Always wear clean underwear. That way, in case there's an accident, you don't scare the nurses. 



Ok, now that is funny!

post #14 of 17

It's the same advice as for any job. DUH. Don't be late. Get your job done. Don't act stupid, Be responsible. Don't steal. Ask questions so you don't goof up. Don't ask to go home early. Wash your hands. Put stuff back where you got it from. Flush. Clean up your own mess. Don't take things that aren't yours. Don't judge people by their appearance. Tell the truth because then you don't have to remember a story. This is simple stuff. I can go on if you like. Let me know if you need more suggestions. 

 

 

 

When you go out in the world, watch out for traffic, hold hands and stick together. Oh yeah, I forgot ..... It's a $10-$12 job, it's not rocket surgery. Even though any/every-one can be replaced in less than an hour, do the best you can. 

 
post #15 of 17

I dont know how culinary school works in USA but in UK you do 3 years in school. 1 year you are a commis chef (at the bottom learing basics) 2nd yr you run a section and 3rd year you run the kitchen. (you also think you are big and know everything at this point though people dont) and when you then become a commis chef again you think you now it all and you dont.

 

you go from being near the top to the bottom again as a job is real life not college. and chefs start getting pissed with you.

 

You have to remember that college is school and a job is real life.

 

A chef lecturer at my college said to me. A college teaches you the right (best) way and a real job teaches you the best (easiest quickest) way of doing something

post #16 of 17
This is a chef on a power trip your not a cook your a chef a team member all u need is to always give 110% and listen good luck
post #17 of 17

 

Quote:
"103: Work at as many Restaurants as possible in the early years"


Disagree.

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