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Next generation commercial kitchen system design

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

  To all who have been in the trenches and front lines of a modern high volume commercial kitchen. I humbly ask your opinion: which brands and their models are most durable and innovative (in that order); which have proved their reliability to you, the diligent and ever  busy modern chef.  I can't go into much detail as to what this design incorporates into a complete system until patents are secured. I can say that some benefits include lifetime seals on coolers, 1/4 the cost of cleaning and maintaining a kitchen, increased safety and sanitation, among many other bonuses. Share your preferences on all categories of equipment from refrigeration and warming to broilers and fryers with an emphasis on cold stations like those used for salad stations, sandwich, cold pizza toppings, etc. Help me design something that could take our idea of modern kitchen design to a whole new level.  I will eagerly be awaiting your wisdom and experience. Thank you all for your time and interest.  I will keep everyone posted with any developmental milestones.

post #2 of 5

So, are you asking for design ideas to better our commercial appliances? Are you the person that can make this wishes come true?

"The moral of this story is not everything that's slick is non-stick, and not everything non-stick is slick."
— Alton Brown

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"The moral of this story is not everything that's slick is non-stick, and not everything non-stick is slick."
— Alton Brown

Reply
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

 I hope to create something useful yes. I have the improvement part worked out. What I'm asking for is which brand names and their corresponding models have been the most maintenance free, well made products. I am looking for a proven design to start with and apply the superficial design changes to it. This is the beauty of this system. I would only be changing the various design flaws which make for maintenance calls, energy loss, and less functionality.  The system centers around incredible ease of cleaning. Based on your feedback I will decide which platforms to start with and which companies to approach in developing this system.Thanks for the question!

post #4 of 5

Equipment is just the icing on the cake.  For a dream kitchen, look first at the infrastructure.

 

The biggie of course is the ventilation shaft for the hood, and of course, airconditioning. Plan the easist/cheapest route for this before starting on anything else 

 

Next most important is the floor.  Submerged grease trap close to an exit--not in the middle of the kitchen, plenty of floor drains. Now, when the final floor comes on, do it "hospital style", that is, pull the floor covering right up to about 4-5" onto the walls, with a nice, easy cove at the floor/wall junction and on inside corners.  Both your health inspector and your janitor will love you for this.

 

Try and do as much refrigeration with remote compressors, your kitchen wil run much quieter and cooler.  Sliding doors on the walk-in will give you some advantages over the regular 30" door.  Refrigerated drawer units under the range, char broiler, etc, are a nice touch.

 

With all equipment you have two choices of installation: Everything on wheels, or everything bolted down to a pedestal.  The second option is more expensive, but there's no opportunity for crud to get under the legs because ther aren't any.

 

Hate fryers with a passion, but plan for and get a "dummy" fryer on your hot line, that is, the fryers are hooked up to a filtration unit (dummy), so there is very little possibility of people burning themselves with hot oil when straining fryers.  You see this in Mickey D's and other fast food places, absoluletly worth the expense.

 

The two most versatile  pieces of equipment are:  A tilt skillet, and a Rational-type oven.  If you have a separate bake dept. put in a deck oven, not a convection.

 

When considering  equipment,  always look at two things:  The mnfctr's warranty, and the distributer/food eqpt store.  If the store you bought if from won't honour the warranty, or is 90 miles away, find another supplier closer.  If the warranty sucks, or if there's no NSF or UL stickers on the equipment, run away--fast. 

 

Everyone has a different idea of a dream kitchen and how to equip it.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Ok that's all well and good and i agree.  I've used a plethora of standard and exotic pieces; know very well what type of equip. is required for any method .  What I'm asking is what pieces of equipment would you reccommend. For example I like the basic Radiant brand broiler because it's sturdy; clever  placement of seams and screws makes for easier cleaning, & of course it cooks well.  I just want to know what people do like. No opinion is the wrong one.  Not so much unlike a consumer report.  

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