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CUTCO Petite Chef - Page 2

post #31 of 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

I happen to be a big fan of F. Dick as well.  Even have a large promotional poster from the early 1900's.

 

Wonder if the moderators will let me post of picture of my big Dick poster?...........lol.gif



LMAO

I have set of the Cutco DD steak knives that I received as a gift. Nearly fell of my chair when I saw what they cost. The only good thing I can say about them is if I send them back I get a new "free" set that lasts a few more months.

 

Dave

 

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #32 of 37

Friend of mine used to sell Cutco  50% of selling price is salesmans commission. They are ok and pretty but for a house, and a housewife , not commercial applications.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #33 of 37

 

It amazes me how many of these knives are out in the world. They produce huge quantities of knives.

post #34 of 37

It amazes me how many people actually think they are great knives. It's probably not a stretch to say you could buy better/equal knives at Wally World for 1/5 the price.

 

Dave


Edited by DuckFat - 3/29/12 at 7:31am
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #35 of 37

They have some of these at my lodge, some with the serrated edge and some with regular edges. When I took my Edgepro Apex there and sharpened some of the knives people donated, I tried shapening a cutco chefs knife. I got a decent edge on it, but I didn't want to waste too much time on it. I also sharpened some Chicago Cutlery knives, and they seemed to be made with better steel than the cutco. There was one old butcher knife that was almost brown with age, and it sharpened up quite nicely. But the cutco's seemed cheap and I wouldn't waste my time on them. And I think some of the posters in this thread must have worked for them, for giving them so much praise, Even the old ginsu knifes weren't much worse than them.

post #36 of 37

I'm a cutlery knife collector and have more knives than I can display including several from Cutco that I bought to satisfy my own curiosity.  I don't form opinions until I've had a chance to use them, sharpen them and use them again because how well they hold their edge and how well easy it is to sharpen them has a lot to do with my opinion of the knife.  

 

The large slicer is as well made as any $15 knife, and so is the large Chef's knife, but nether is in the same class as any $60+ knife I own including other stamped knives like many made by Mac or even old Gerber's.  The serrated slicer might beat out almost every other knife in Cutco's "cutting layers of sandpaper" test, but I can't think of a kitchen use that simulates that abuse, and its performance in the kitchen does not surpass lots of other knives that do only cost about $15.  I suspect there are many hacksaw blades that would beat Cutco's serrated performance, and that fact would not make them any more superior in the kitchen, than their serrated knives are just because they do a good job cutting sandpaper.  That's a lousy way to test a fine knife.

 

I have used and resharpened the large Cutco Chefs knife a few times, and it's nothing special but rather mediocre at holding an edge and not particularly easy to sharpen because the metal is more malleable than I prefer.  I'm not saying it's a total piece of junk, but it's a long way away from a fine knife in design and quality.  Serrated Ginsu knives have many of the same qualities at a tiny fraction of Cutco's price.

 

Cutco brags about their handle design and I don't think it's anything to brag about.  It's not comfortable for any long task like a real chef might have done in their kitchen, and perhaps that's one reason I don't think I've ever seen one in a professional kitchen.  Most commercial kitchens and butcher shops have an abundance of knives, and they usually make their selection on two factors, cost and quality.  The top chef might have a few expensive knives that no one else touches, but the help who do most of the work usually use low cost medium quality knives like Victorinox or Dexter because they work, are indestructible, and don't cost a lot.  I understand why many people, myself included, who actually do less work with their knives are willing to pay far more to have much higher quality knives, but I don't pretend their necessary if you're going to be a good cook.  I own many fine knives, but do not consider the Cutco knives I own to be in that class.

 

Cutco knives are great for knife sobs like me, but with one small difference, they who know nothing about knives, and couldn't put a good edge on a real good knife even if they owned one.  Of course they like the Cutco slicer, it's an expensive knife and they can probably prove it to you by showing you their receipt, so it does have snob appeal.  They also have physical proof because it cuts their meat, fruit and veggies every time, proof enough for anyone who's never had a real good sharp knife in their hand.  No use arguing with people who have never used a better knife and by better I don't just mean one with a better name, but one that is also sharp.  I've been in countless homes where all their knives regardless of quality or brand, were dull as butter knives because they never sharpen them.  

 

Fact is that a Cutco owner who can't sharpen a good knife is probably better off with a serrated blade than they would be with the best un-serrated blade on the market.  It's also a fact that they would be just as well off with lots of other serrated knives that cost a fraction of what they spent on their overpriced Cutco wonder knife.  You can't enlighten them by telling them about the difference, the only way they will become convinced is if they actually have the opportunity to use a very good knife that has been appropriately sharpened for the task their about to perform.  I have done that with a few Cutco fans and surprised them.  None dumped their Cutco knives but a few did acquire better knives and I help them keep them sharp.

post #37 of 37

Cutco's prices are at the top and their quality way below what I would expect at that price.  I own several and they don't compare to real quality knives around the same price.

 

Pro's

 

Extremely durable, thanks to the low temper and malleable metal used in their blades.

Snob appeal, great if your showing off the receipt to people who don't know much about good knives.

The factory will sharpen them for a small shipping and handling fee, that is a bit less than what a comparable knife might cost.

 

Con's

 

Their extremely overpriced

Their fancy handle design isn't comfortable for long use

Their serrated blades are not easy to sharpen at home

Their soft blades don't hold an edge very long, Chefs knife comment

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