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OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE'S CHARGRILLED RIBEYE!!!!!

post #1 of 43
Thread Starter 

Outback's chargrilled ribeye has to be the best steak that I have ever tried. Does anyone know how they do it? It comes out with juices all over it and is VERY tasty. Need some help on this one.Thanks.

post #2 of 43

No, sorry.

I've eaten ONCE at the London franchise of the American chain.  Taken there by an Australian relative who thought we'd be eating at an Australian restaurant.  WRONG!

 

It has little or nothing to do with Australia, so I wonder why they use the name 'outback'?

post #3 of 43

Todd Wilbur has covered a lot of the outback recipes. Check out his site www.topsecretrecipes.com 

post #4 of 43
Thread Starter 

I LOOKED ON TODD'S WEBSITE FOR THE SECRET CHARGRILLED RIBEYE RECIPE BUT HE DOESN'T HAVE THAT ONE. SURELY SOMEONE KNOWS IT........THANKS FOR THE HELP

post #5 of 43

I've never been to Outback, but after a little research it seems their rub is slightly spicy and very straightforward.  Salt, paprika, pepper, granulated garlic, granulated onion, a little coriander, a touch of cayenne (or maybe chile de arbol), and a little (dry) mustard.  Nothing special really.  If you don't want to fool around tweaking your own rub, it's very close "Montreal Steak Seasoning," which would undoubtedly serve as well.

 

It's also very close to my "Basic Beef Rub" which says something about stupid minds running in the same small circles... or something.

 

On a more fundamental level... What are you really asking?  Their rub recipe?  How to char-grill a steak?  Indoors?  Outdoors? Over a live charcoal fire? If you can't make a juicy, "tasty" steak with any of a variety of steak cuts, maybe we should start with the basics.

 

"Juices all over it" means a steak has been sauced in some way.  If the steak bleeds a lot of juices when cut, it wasn't properly rested. 

 

BDL

 

PS.  Unless you have vision problems, please don't type in all caps.


Edited by boar_d_laze - 8/12/11 at 10:00am
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post #6 of 43
Thread Starter 

IF YOU HAVE NEVER BEEN TO OUTBACK AND TRIED IT THEN HOW CAN YOU SAY THAT IT'S LIKE YOURS OR ANYONE ELSES?

IT'S NOTHING CLOSE TO MONTREAL STEAK SEASONING. I'VE TRIED THAT.

I'M ASKING FOR THE RUB OR SAUCE THAT THEY USE.

I DOES LOOK LIKE IT'S BEEN SAUCED,IT'S VERY WET WHEN THEY SERVE IT. EVEN WITNESSED SOMEONE RETURN ONE TO BE COOKED LONGER AND WHEN THEY GOT IT BACK IT WAS JUST AS WET ON THE OUTSIDE AS IT WAS BEFORE, MAYBE MORE.

 

okok maybe i was a little out of line. It just hit wrong. I have never heard of caps being proper courtesy. Might have learned somthing today.Sorry.

 

 

 


Edited by jim790 - 8/12/11 at 1:11pm
post #7 of 43

Well, having eaten at Outback and having read this thread, I agree with BDL's answer as to ingredients, largely, and with his rumination on if you wanted technique tips. He did research it, not pull it out of thin air.

 

Salt, pepper, granulated onion/garlic, paprika form the basis of most every meat rub in common usage. But as with any general list, the nuance is in the ratios. I could make a good rub out of the same ingredient list as Montreal Steak seasoning and it would taste rather different.

 

I'd probably omit the paprika and coriander personally.

 

While you don't yet grok BDL, and he has his own peculiar style, he didn't overstep. You did. Calm it down.

 

Oh, and don't type in all caps. It's rude and bothersome.

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
While you don't yet grok...

Ah, brings back fond memories, SIASL
 

 

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post #9 of 43

When it comes to good steak, less is often more. Simplicity, high heat and proper resting are the keys to a good steak generally. Which is more about technique than seasoning.

 

While Outback protects their exact rub recipe and no one here seems to have created their own copy, Google supplies a number of hits that purport to copy it.  Most of the copies are fairly heavy on the salt and I don't recall the steaks being that salty either. They otherwise agree with BDL's list though I haven't hit on one with the mustard powder but have found a few with turmeric.

 

What have you tried so far? Once we know that we can probably be more helpful in refining your recipe and technique to give you what you want.

 

 

The dislike of all caps stems from the early days of the internet where it was seen as the equivalent of SHOUTING. This has largely persisted though IM, twitter and such haven't helped preserve this tradition of courtesy.

 

 

post #10 of 43
Thread Starter 

I do agree with you about the steaks not being all that salty. The more I think about it I would bet that the big taste that I can't seem to get over is probably in the sauce. I've tried most off the shelf common steak seasonings and while they are good but not like theirs. How can they put it back on the grill and cook it more without drying it out? It has to be the sauce right? What are some sauce recipes that I could try? Is that a common practice? Thanks for the help.

post #11 of 43

It's been a while and I don't recall a sauce per se.  I think they just pour whatever juices came out during resting back over the steak. With the volume they do, they probably have plenty of meat juices available.

 

http://www.ehow.com/how_4430733_grill-steak-like-outback-steakhouse.html indicates they have a 17 ingredient rub. And they say pepperberry is the secret. I don't know how right they are, but  they also make no mention of a sauce.

 

While I think a ribeye is fatty enough, on some leaner cuts, i do occasionally enjoy a flavored butter as a finishing accent on a steak.

post #12 of 43
Thread Starter 

Hey that might be work! I'm gonna try it out. Do you think that the butter they use to seer it in is the sauce or juice that they serve it with? You may be on to somthing here.Thanks

post #13 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim790 View Post

...How can they put it back on the grill and cook it more without drying it out?...

Are you absolutely certain that's what they did? Are you really sure they didn't start with a new steak?

 

I don't know what they did, but, from a food safety standpoint, food that leaves the kitchen can no longer be considered uncontaminated, IMHO, and they may have started over. Iy would not be the first time that a restaurant trashed a meal to keep a customer happy, now would it?

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post #14 of 43

Seasoning aside, the big secrets to making a steak of the sort of thicknesses we're talking about are:

 

(1)  Clean and well lubricated grill with both very hot, and mid-hot zones. (2) An adequate resting period after cooking.

 

Allow the steak about twenty minutes out of the fridge, season it, and allow it another twenty minutes to come to room temp.  Put the steak on the hot part of the grill, and allow the grids to tattoo the steak -- usually around 90 - 120 seconds.  Rotate the steak 45* to create a cross-hatch pattern.  Note:  If you have enough grill space, use a fresh area.  Turn the steak over and repeat, as before.  Test the steak for done-ness with a finger push.  

 

If it needs further cooking, move the steak to the mid-hot zone and allow it to finish.  Experience will teach you how long that's going to take -- divide it in half and try to get equal cooking on both sides.

 

Remove the steak, put it on something warm -- or at least out of the draft -- and allow an adequate rest period.  5 minutes for a 1" steak is barely adequate, 7 minutes is better.  The rest evens out the color distribution and "settles the juices" so they don't run out when the steak is cut and leave it dry.

 

Sizzle plates are a nice way of bringing some heat back to the steaks for service.

 

There are several good ways to get extra gloss on steak.  Most of them involve butter to one degree or another.  The simplest is to brush the steak with melted butter just before service.  Another is to put a pat of regular or compound butter on the steak while it's resting -- that way it goes to the table about half melted and half oozing.  A pretty sight.  I usually make a reduced wine/stock jus and "butter mount" it, not only because it's enhances the steak but because it unites the garnishes with the steak.

Steak, Spinach, Roast Potato.jpg

 

This is dinner for two, ready to plate.  It appears that someone ate one of her croutons before I could get dinner on the plates.  Note the jus on the plate with the rib steak.  Note also, the gloss on the steak.

 

If you want to talk seasoning we can.  But as to how Outback in particular does it, you're on your own.  I doubt you'll find their exact ingredients or be able to mimic all of their techniques, but don't doubt you can do better.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 8/12/11 at 6:29pm
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post #15 of 43

OK. Since this is post #15, I don't feel bad tangentially diverting just a bit here. I don't know about Outback, bit big steak-houses have grills that can put out 4 digit temps, that give you a killer crust with a beautiful edge-to-edge red-pink inside. You can get the same result at home if you pull this trick off properly. Start with your steaks at room temp. Dry them as best as you can. Mix a batch of 50/50 sea salt / corn starch. Rub down the steaks, both sides. The salt draws moisture out of the crust, the starch dries it up. Put the steaks in your freezer on a raised rack for from 30 minutes to 45 minutes, no longer. While waiting, get your grill screaming hot. Pull out the steaks and put them immediately on the grill and close it up. Don't even think of opening up the grill for 4 minutes with larger hotter grills, 5 minutes with smaller grills. Very quickly open the grill and flip the steaks, close the grill. Repeat for 4 or 5 minutes. Pull off the steaks and let them rest. That timing should give you perfect rare steak-house steaks. YMMV. 

 

As far as seasonings, I much prefer Webber's Chicago Steak Seasonings to anybody's Montreal. Where/how did Montreal ever get any big steak reputation? Pansys. I also like to re-grind mine and use less. The big bottle from Webber's has an adjustable knob on the bottom. I find it cheaper to just refill it. 

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post #16 of 43

One thing you can't do that Outback does is about an hour or 2 before service treat or dip your steks into Papain. It is a seasoned or unseasoned tenderizer (derived from tropical fruit sources ,an enzyme)  that is purchased commercially. One thing to take note of is when you cut into a rare outback steak it does not throw as much blood as a steak from your house or other steakhouse simply because the papain  bath tends to make it loose moisture before it is cooked, as it is marinating in the solution. If their steaks were not dipped or treated, you could not chew them.Here in FloridaI knew the fellow who sold the local outbacks their spices,herbs and Papain products I believe they must put an Au Jus of soughts on top of the steak so they won'r be dry.

    As far as what BDL said re Montreal seasoning he could very well be right. If you try some of the assorted brands they are not quite all the same, and you have not tried them all . It very well could be  a form of what Emiril called BAM which you make yourself. I am sure Outbacks in comes made already as to insure consistancy in all their outlets. Another large factor  is an at home cook can't duplcate the amount of heat that is used in a commercial place either inside or outside. Your house would go on fire or your outside grill would melt.

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post #17 of 43
Thread Starter 

4 digit temps? What heat source do they use to do this? That's just used for searing right? boar-d-laze mentioned hot and mid-hot zones, what temp would the mid-hot zones be? That's a nice looking steak makes me water at the mouth.  All of the advice is well apreciated and I want to thank everyone for their time on this topic. I'm going to do some serious experimenting on the in-laws.lol.gif

post #18 of 43
Thread Starter 

chefedb...Is the papain available to the public? It does make sense about the blood not running out of the steak and is very tender.

post #19 of 43

Several of the common grocery store meat tenderizers contain papain, Adolphs etc. I have eaten at Outback and wasn't that impressed, I can do better at home.

post #20 of 43

Tradewinds Meat Tenderizer

 

Salt

Dextrose

Standardized Papain

Silicon Dioxide (as an anti-caking agent)

 

There is a "seasoned variety" as well

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post #21 of 43

4 digit temps usually mean an IRC.  There are other methods. 

 

High heat on an outdoor grill is going to be north of 400 -- if you're using charcoal, that means the grill not too far from the coals, and the coals just ashed over.  In other words, a fairly fresh fire. 

 

The mid heat zone is hot enough to cook, but not hot enough to sizzle.  275 - 350 on the grate.

 

Most thermometers won't give you a good reading when held directly over the fire.  In fact, most of them will get killed in one way or another.  Holding your hand an inch above the grill is a very good way of judging temps.  Hold out a flat palm above the coals and start counting.  When the heat drives your hand off, stop.  There's no right number for everyone.  My wife's 2, is my 8.  Most people think of 4 or less as hot, and 8 or more as cold.  So if you're like most people, sear at 2-3 and finish cooking at 5-7. 

 

If the hand method doesn't work, try holding an in-law over the coals.  One Mississippi, two Mississippi...

 

BDL

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post #22 of 43

Try and get a meat tenderizer that contains little salt. 99 out of 100 times it will be papain as main ingredient with silicone dioxide

Like Mary says Adolphs is available iun supermarket but get the one that is low or no salt..

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post #23 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ishbel View Post

 

It has little or nothing to do with Australia, so I wonder why they use the name 'outback'?

 

 

Here's a link that sheds light on why the owners (Floridians!) chose the name:

 

http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/Outback-Steakhouse-Inc-Company-History.html

 

post #24 of 43

Who cares how they make it?  Just go to Outback and eat it there.  I've given up on trying to duplicate recipes from chain restaurants.  I'm guilty of liking those Outback ribeyes myself (and Cracker Barrel hashbrown casserole, and krispy kreme donuts, and the list goes on).  But duplicating the flavors never ever works, probably because their stuff is swimming with preservatives.  I wouldn't be surprised if a major ingredient in Outback's rub is MSG and some other ingredient I can't pronounce.  I make a killer ribeye at home and have a killer ribeye at Outback when I go.  The 2 are not the same but both good.  Personally I prefer Texaas Steakhouse.

 

Oh and I believe that Outback only recently got a grill, in the past they've always broiled their steaks.

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post #25 of 43

For what it's worth, one can far exceed 400F with a humble 22.5 inch Weber charcoal grill. 600F+ isn't even a challenge if we're considering dome/air temperature with the lid on, but I don't think that's the point anyway. Searing power can be boosted by choosing the right fuel and using the grill correctly.Venerable 'ol Kingsford is great for consistency and control, but it's not the best thing around for all out, raw heat output. Perhaps not approaching commercial gear, but a chimney starter full of lump charcoal or small mesquite chunk (I like a mix) dumped right against the side of the grill will will provide a zone that's screaming hot. The standard 1 second, 2 second rule is useless. 800-1000F+. I challenge anyone to set their grill up this way and get to a second before self preservation causes their hand to jerk back.  Bear in mind that lump or wood that has gone to coals is hotter, but also burns much faster than pressed briquettes. You must pay attention or you'll miss the coal's peak output.

 

I believe the chimney starter is part of the key. Rather than using lighter fluid to get the coals started, the starter has a definite updraft that gets your fuel of choice raging faster and much more evenly. Getting lump charcoal going in a chimney starter at dusk is a sight; 2/3rds of the thing is glowing white hot by the time the coals are ready to be poured into the grill. 10 minutes or so to bring the grill up to temp (with the lid on, vents wide open) and then it's showtime.

 

I wouldn't try this in a discount store grill, you might melt it. Weber kettle grills are porcelain-enamel coated and can stand the temp.

 

For me, steak rubbed with simple salt 'n pepper seared over mesquite is joy to the taste buds.

 

Phreon

 

 

 

 


Edited by Phreon - 8/13/11 at 8:01pm
post #26 of 43

Jim I understand your frustration here. Outback's chargrilled ribeye does NOT use their regular rub. For this discussion to go down that path was flawed to begin with. It is my understanding the rub they use for the chargrilled ribeyes is an espresso rub. As for the exact recipe, I don't know.
 

post #27 of 43

 Outback always tastes like Adolph's to me and if you are looking for a seasoning blend that will get fairly close you may want to look at "Red Eye" seasoning from Dizzy Pig.

AFAIK Outback cooks their steaks on a flat top so sear temps are fairly moot if your trying to mimic their product.

 

 

http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/HTMLrubs/redeye.html

 

Dave

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post #28 of 43
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the input. I'll give those a try.

post #29 of 43

Jim, If you are trying recipes, try this one. It is my go to recipe for ribeye. Combine 4 parts kosher salt, 1 part black pepper, and 1 part garlic powder. Rub both sides of steak with Worcestershire and sprinkle liberally with seasoning. Allow to come to room temperature and grill as usual. Let rest for 3-5 minutes. Enjoy

post #30 of 43
Thread Starter 

I'll give it a try and let you know how it turns out. Thanks. Jim

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