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Please help us with our cook book (11 year olds from NZ)

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi we are Hana and Courtney, students from Stonefields School which is in Auckland, New Zealand. We are both 11 years old and are wanting to make a difference in society! We are making a cook book made up from easy but traditional recipes from all over the world. We are going to  sell the cook book and give all our profits to a charity of our choice w(e are still deciding on the charity.) We were wondering if you could please send in your cultural recipes to us - it can be a tradition recipe or just a special one to you.

We would love to hear from you and you can either:


If you're not sure if your recipe is ideal, please get in touch anyway and we can tell you.

Thanks heaps for your help! We're very excited to make a difference in the world!!!       


Edited by courtneyandhana - 8/29/11 at 10:18pm
post #2 of 22

OK, I'll play.  Here is a Potsticker recipe using a simple pork and cilantro filling.  You can use the same filling in Wontons if you like (use the square wrappers).  You can also add chopped shrimp to the filling if you want for a fancier filling.  My children make these for parties and school events. Our local wine bar now uses this recipe and serves these as appetizers.  They sell out.  I'm "hapa" Chinese and grew up in Hawaii.

 

Potstickers (Kuo Teh)

 

½ pound ground pork

½ small can water chestnuts chopped fine

½ small bunch cilantro leaves chopped

½” piece of ginger root peeled and chopped fine

3 green onions chopped fine

½ tsp salt

1 T soy sauce

1 ½  T oyster sauce

 

1 package potsticker wrappers, defrosted (usually 30-35 pieces)

 

Mix all filling ingredients together thoroughly.  Refrigerate until ready to use.

 

Line baking sheets with wax paper and dust with cornstarch.

Set out small dish of water.

 

Wet your finger and run it around the outside ½ inch of wrapper.  Place 1 heaping tsp of filling in center of wrapper and fold over and seal.  Pleat top of wrapper with 2-3 pleats to make dumpling stand up better (looks better too).  Place on baking sheet.

 

Refrigerate until used.  If you aren’t cooking them that day, they can be frozen on the baking sheets and then bagged and kept frozen until use.  Don’t defrost before cooking.

 

To cook, heat 1-2 tsp oil on med heat in a frying pan for which you have a cover (a domed cover is best).  You can use a bit less oil if you use a non-stick pan.  Place dumplings in pan, not touching, and brown on bottom.  When they are golden brown on bottom, add ¾ cup of water (amount may vary based on size of pan and number of dumplings) and cover pan immediately.  Cook until water is fully absorbed, 4-6 minutes.  Remove cover and crisp bottom, 1-2 minutes.  Serve.

 

You can serve with a dipping sauce of 1/2 cup soy sauce, 1-2 T rice vinegar, and 1 tsp sesame oil.  Red pepper or chile oil is optional.

post #3 of 22

hi girls,

i would be more than happy to contribute however, whatever i can...one question to help me though...what do you mean exactly by traditional recipes? are you talking about recipes from what part of the country we are in or more from our heritage...for instance, i live in the southwest u.s. where there is a lot of mexican and spanish influence, but i grew up very italian...again, whatever i can do to help and you go girls..it's fantastic...best of luck!!!

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 

Wow, that's so amazing that you come from Hawaii as well as china. You must be full of fantastic recipes from both countries! The recipe looks delicious, but it is quite hard to get cilantro leaves in New Zealand, do you think, that the dish will still taste good?

Thank you so much for letting us use your delicious recipe!

We look forward from hearing from you.

post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hello Joey,

Thank you so much for your interest in our cook book.

We would be honured to have any  cultural recipes no matter where they are from at this stage but we are very interested in your Italian recipes.

Thank you so much for supporting and contributing in our cook book.

We are looking forward from hearing from you!chef.gif

post #6 of 22

I'm Scottish, with a number of relatives living in NZ (although I've got lots more in Australia!)

 

Are you interested in Scottish recipes?  For instance, cullen skink (a smoked haddock soup) or partan bree (a crab soup) or parlies (a biscuit) or shortbread?  Or are these all too plain and bland for you?

post #7 of 22

You can certainly make potstickers without cilantro and they will be just fine.

post #8 of 22

C&H: Great project. Good luck with it. I'll post some recipes soon as I have a chance. In the meantime, on the cilantro issue, it might be called corriander where you live.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post

C&H: Great project. Good luck with it. I'll post some recipes soon as I have a chance. In the meantime, on the cilantro issue, it might be called corriander where you live.


That's a good thought.  May be a matter of nomenclature.

 

post #10 of 22

I will sure love to help you guys on this project.  I will get you some real mexican recipes... I will check and try to send you some that the ingredients will be easy to find.  Are you interested on some desserts also? 

 

Cheers

post #11 of 22

Hi Ladies,

  I think you have a great idea. You mentioned a charity.

I hope I'm not stepping on toes here, but I wanted to throw out the

idea of recipes that would be associated with your charity. Nothing in depth. Easy traditional recipes. Something like maybe healthy meals for people with suppressed immune systems.

Organic meals for children with bipolar disease. etc.

FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 

 

Yes we would please love some deserts Thank you  chef.gif

post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the ideas they are all very great those recipes sound delicious we would love those recipes in our cook book   Thank you  chef.gif

post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 

Om that sounds like a delicious recipe we would love to have it in our cook book I never knew that cilantro was corriander in new zealand  Thank you  chef.gif

post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thank you so much for your idea, Yes we would love some healthy recipes!!!   We have now chosen our charity and we have decided to do the cancer society but we would still love to have some healthy recipes in our cook book  Thank you  chef.gif

post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hi everybody,

 

Hope you are having fun cooking.

Thank you for your input towards our cookbook.  We are just about to start putting our cookbook together and we would really appreciate it if you could please continue sending in your recipes to us as we can not wait to create the finished product.

 

Regards

Hana and Courtney

post #17 of 22

sorry ladies,

i've  just been swamped lately...but now that i can see over the alligators, i promise to send you my recipes on monday.....cheers, girls....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #18 of 22

Hello Hana and Courtney, I am 11 years old   from the Philippines. We also have a charity called the Healthy Kidchen, where me and my siblings cook for other poor kids and give them to schools. I hope you can read my blog at thejuniorchef.wordpress.com

 

Here is a very popular native recipe from the Philippines:

 

Chicken Adobo

 

500 g chicken , (any part or a combination of parts; wing, leg, breast, etc)

1 cup vinegar

3/4 cup soy sauce

1 whole garlic, crushed

pepper

2 bay leaves

 

Put everything in a wok. Let boil for 30 minutes. Done.

 

You can replace the chicken with pork or you can combine pork and chicken.

post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 

 

Hi,

 

Thank you so much for your recipe it looks delicious,  It is so nice to relate to someone our own age.  

We looked at your blog we thought it was a good idea to share your recipes with other in the world.  Once again thank you!

 

 

Regards 

Hana and Courtney

post #20 of 22

Hi Hana and Courtney,

I sent off some recipes today for you to choose from, but just had a thought. Would you want any recipes for our four legged doggie friends? That might be a fun addition, as well as a good selling point. I have quite a few...'slobber dog stew', 'mutts nutts', 'doggie biscotti', 'coonhound meatloaf', 'let's have a party pate'...just to name a few.

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #21 of 22

Hi Hana and Courtney

 

I just sent some recipes to you.  All the best with your cookbook!

OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #22 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thank you very much for all the recipes everyone they sound delicious.

 

Regards

Hana and Courtney

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