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Funny how this becomes almost an annual thing.

Poll Results: Stay? Go? Wait?

 
  • 25% (1)
    Suck it up ...stay
  • 50% (2)
    Forget them ...go
  • 25% (1)
    Patients is a virtue ...wait
4 Total Votes  
post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

At a crossroads again but things have changed...quite a bit this time.

 

Professional long story made short; another new director, another new chef.  But the similarities from my past dilemma end there; my unit got a total face lift introducing new concepts.  I've also taken up a management position at a different unit that works out OK for me because its closer. 

 

Now I don't know if my new position comes with a raise; more responsibilities so I figured it would but nothing was ever discussed with me as such, just basically dropped me in and do the job.  Nothing got hammered out and I'm hoping to rectify that this week.

 

The situation; this will be my 7th year with the company, I haven't gotten far with so many promises left broken with each new manager being changed out as often as my underwear (stupid me keeps falling for that dangling worm on the hook).  I've looked around for another job and internal transfer but nothing pops up, nothing I'm qualified for, and nothing sustainable.  I've also been offered a job with my uncles who run their own business of doing custom setups for hi-fi A/V equipment...something I have no knowledge and experience with or any qualifications but would pay more then what I'm making now (just a little over $12/hr).  I might also find myself needing to help support someone from overseas for a while within the coming years so whatever I do, I need to be paid enough to sustain 2 adults for a few years at least.

 

My dilemma; stay with my guaranteed job that I trained for but barely pays a living wage right now and hope for the best later or retrain myself so I can work with family and get paid a living wage while throwing away everything I worked so hard towards with my schooling and my 7 years and hope I can catch on.  And on that note, how hard is it to get back in?  I had a difficult enough time just finding a job right out of college.  But right now, my decision is hindered by whether or not this place is willing to make it worth my while (which it hasn't for a long time) to take up again more responsibilities...

 

This isn't a decision I'm taking very lightly but I'm being pressured left right and center to make one when I don't even have all the facts.

post #2 of 13

You have been there 7 years and as you say got a lot of promises.  Go with your uncles. You can always get back in this raquet.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #3 of 13

Screw the mngrs.  Book yourself an apointment with CORPORATE  H.R..  Get your facts and ducks in a row.  Smile, don't threaten, but do explain that you can't exist on $12.00 per hr and train up staff.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post

...explain that you can't exist on $12.00 per hr and train up staff.

 

 

...and they'll offer you $12.25 and try to make it sound like they're doing you a favor.

 

This all just screams of bullsh*t. 

They are going to use you.  They have been.  They will continue.

I could break it down sentence by sentence, but...  I mean, look at what you said!

 

Run with that A/V job.  Sounds interesting, and you need a back-up profession.

The food industry will always be here if you get the urge.

Learn a new skill.  If it doesn't work out, fall back.

Ain't a big deal.

A lot of us have multiple "skill" sets.

 

You can re-enter the field at a later date.

 

 

 

post #5 of 13

HC, we all get stuck in this trap early in our careers, there is a point in" almost" every Chef's career that they have to stop kissing ass, and reaching for the carrot. I would start using these places are stepping stones and building blocks to a clear path to the career you want. If your not getting the promotions you want, you may be working for a company that really doesn't give two shits if you ever get promoted, or achieve your goals. The goal of every Chef should not be looking for a pay raise from $12 to $13 an hour, they should be building their knowledge base to make $50 an hr. If your working a position and your career is at a stand still, learn everything you can and move on. Be the kind of Chef that is sought after, not the one that waits for someone else to dictate the time line of your career. I have Chef's, with 25 yrs experience, applying for cooks positions that pay $12 Hr, look how far they have come, to go full circle. They have worked their asses off for years, have had a multitude of broken promises, they are back to square one.

 If I had to give one piece of advice it would be, set your own goals, set your own career path. When I was moving up in this business, I worked in Catering, Fine dining, Coffee shop, fast food, Events and Coliseum food service fine dining and concessions, water-park high volume concessions, Private club catering & fine dining. Hawaiian & Oriental Restaurants/ Demo Wok cooking, Food Service Management large employee contract feeding, Vending, and Hotel Food and Bev management. When I started my business, I fell back on, and continue to fall back on, the experiences and knowledge I obtained in all of these Food services.............. What your doing today is, building a foundation of knowledge and experiences, for a career path that only you can set and achieve. ........................The Best..................ChefBillyB

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Well it looks like I'll be writing up a letter of resignation.

 

I'm told through my site manager that he sees no reason for a pay increase given that I'm technically doing the same job at a different site.  If this is the case then I guess I'll be throwing away my 7 years with them.  In his eyes, it seems that I have to prove myself.  Well I was given the chef's shoes when he was let go 2 weeks after my accident, so I was pulling 10+ hours on my feet which were injured for 8 months running the place with next to no support at the surprise of our new chef and no pay increase since it was a "temporary" solution...and this isn't proof enough of my abilities?  If thats the case then theres no impressing him...

post #7 of 13

Run, don't walk, towards the family buisness. a/v is the easiest stuff to learn. kudos for sticking for seven years but it's time for you to do right by yourself. You will always be welcome in the Pro forums here.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #8 of 13

Ahh.... Headless? 

I tolja to see the Corporate HR, not the dip-wad mngr.  He doesn't see you as a human bean, he sees you as a potential labour cost negative, and he doesn't realize that the kitchen will fall apart in the next week or so.

 

From what I see in your posts, the mngmt at your location doesn't last more than 6 mths, tops. New mngr comes in, and is told to better the last guy's food and labour costs.  If you don't squawk, you won't get a raise, the mngrs are calculating on paying you 12 bucks and using your sweat to get them a better job--or the negotiated benefits are thier proposed F&L  %'s .  That's life.  Even if you work for an A/V place, sooner or later you're going to have to negotiate a better salary.

 

The only Chefs I know/knew who would promote and raise salaries for their employees, were the ones who had worked at the place for years and were secure and content in their jobs. Not many of those around--especially in a corporate setting.  Keep this in mind, O.K.?

 

If you really want to go into AV, then  do it.  If you really want to cook, then do it. 

 

Peace my friend, and stick around.  We like you here on this site, O.K.?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm not going anywhere anytime soon.  This AV gig is hopefully a temporary solution, my uncles know my heart is set in this industry so its just something to tie me over till I can land a kitchen job.

 

Corporate wouldn't have done anything, its not up to them.  Site managers and directors are tasked with payroll, hires/terminations, scheduling, and assigning tasks...all with the approval of the District manager/director.  Corporate HR just signs the checks to pay us.  Ultimately there was no one above my director I could have gone to in regards to my pay status other then if it went missing.

 

And my 7 years, I was secure but only because the site knew they could use and abuse me.  Like I said before, they like to play the game of dangling the carrot over my head and every attempt to negotiate better pay resulted in between nothing to $0.25/hour hoping to bank on that carrot to supplement the remaining value of what they don't want to pay me.  But this isn't the only factors of my leaving.

 

In my 7 years, I've developed sleep apnea, calcified ankles (which is slowly getting worse), and during the worst 3 years of my career under an idiot, my blood pressure was near lethal levels that once a week for 2 months straight my nose would spontaneously bleed out (we managed to get that guy fired but the situation hasn't improved much).  On top of home pressures, I'll be seeing some drastic lifestyle changes within the next few months, my original $12.23/hr that was barely sustainable for me would be a joke. 

post #10 of 13

Managers?? The next step after manager is out the door.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

Well management really doesn't want to see me leave, I've worked with most of them my entire career with there and they've offered advice and suggestions to reconsider.  But if my director's actions were any indication of my value to him was, I'm glad I put my resignation in.  At first, he pitched the idea of trying to keep me on part time as he changed his story to "waiting till January to review personnel for possible promotions".  I figured the guy was just gonna try and use me till the end of the year then fire me but I hadn't given him an answer and that offer was very quickly rescinded, a replacement was found (of a sorts), and he instructed the executive chef to basically finalize my termination by asking for my cut off date and offering some words of encouragement on my decision.  I don't even think he really even wants to know why even though he asked.

 

I'm just going to keep this resignation clean; no drama, no rage quit...I'm gone by Friday, I'll setup the place as they've instructed me to then pass the torch. 

 

In all honesty, I really didn't want to leave.  My new position is closer to home, the unit should be easier to run, but still in the end I came to the conclusion that I couldn't afford to keep working for the company.  Its taken a serious toll on my health and personal life.  I probably would have stayed if they even offered only $13/hour but I'm just fed up with working with someone who thinks they're all that and needs proof without looking at my records.  I've done this far too many times now so I had to draw the line somewhere.

post #12 of 13

Look ahead not backwards. Chalk it up to experience. Good luck

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks chefedb,

I don't regret my decision, I just hate my reasoning and situation that forced me to make that choice.  Especially since this was my first and only kitchen job.

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