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Dicing an onion.... - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnePiece View Post

It might be too much pressure.

 

I will need to try dicing an onion with my knife when I go get it (I moved and don't have it with me till the 10th).

It seems that because he pulls across the onion, it slices rather than just going it through it.  I think that is also my problem.

Yes, he is "slicing", not "chopping", almost any knife works better that way.
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #32 of 36

You might also try making the horizontal cuts first, before you make the vertical ones. I find that way a bit less of a hassle than the other. 

post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post

You might also try making the horizontal cuts first, before you make the vertical ones. I find that way a bit less of a hassle than the other. 

Um, I'm not positive, but I think that is what the OP was asking about was the horizontal cuts, the first cuts done on the video.
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #34 of 36

BDL - thanks, though I'm not sure Siduri was a goddess, but I like the idea of the mythological innkeeper - stop by for a beer and some good food, and get some advice on Life sort of thing...

 

I don't see my way of slicing and then cross slicing all on the board as slower.  The slices usually end up on top of each other more or less, and the cross cuts done on the board are no slower than the cross cuts done before you slice it.  Having studied art and knowing how to do crosshatching with a pencil (making even lines quickly) it seems to be quite efficient and accurate (though rarely is accuracy necessary for any of my home cooking) and i generally like to keep doing the same sort of action, rather than have to change hands and do another kind of action.  (I'm quicker on the computer because i do most of the "mouse" work by using the keys and save that time changing hand position back and forth).  I guess it's my main reason for slicing and then cross slicing.  If i have to do several onions, i'm doing the same action all the way through and that saves time.  

 

I also find it harder to do it your way, but that's a circular problem because i don't like doing it that way so i don't practice it, and see no need to because my way works for me.  Maybe if i had a great knife rather than a good knife, it would seem easier.  Anyway, i have no chef breathing down my back with his preferred technique in mind and so have another reason to keep doing it this waysmile.gif

 

One last thought - I do like food to look like food and not geometric objects.  I like food to look rough and more natural - never got the Japanese taste for making food look like little cylinders and squares that you can't figure out what they are.  I like the top of a potato salad to look like i just piled it on, the top of the cake to show the swirls of the frosting application, the pieces of vegetable to look like real vegetables.  In art we called it "truth to materials" and i never liked trompe l'oeil, though i know it appeals to many - not my style.  Finally, when roasting chopped vegetables, the uneven shapes take on different levels of carmelization and that adds taste and eye appeal. 

 

on that line, i submit my Haiku called Japanese Lunch:

 

A pencil box,

two pencils,

lots of colored erasers

 

sorry - jet lagged and getting carried away

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #35 of 36

Siduri! 

Home one can do whatever they want, but in a food service setting everything must be uniform and consistant. Home sometime I use a machine for a lt of things, but again it is not consistant.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #36 of 36
Siduri = Goddess of wine, wisdom, and par-tay.

BDL
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