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Looking for Vegan Sorbet Stabilizer

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I was disappointed to find out that the Cremodan Sorbet Stabilizer I received has gelatin in it.  Some of the supplier websites I view do not include much detailed product info and my rep isn't much better.

I get enough vegans in my restaurant that I like to at least be able to offer sorbet in addition to fresh fruit if requested, so I would prefer to use a stabilizer that doesn't have gelatin.  

Is anyone out there using a brand they would recommend?

post #2 of 18

Jelly, There is a brand, something like Pinkas? It's in a tube. I'll go find it. I know it's vegan.

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
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post #3 of 18

You could just blend your own. I've got a formula written down somewhere.

post #4 of 18

A quick look at my sources says that you can use ~0.2% of Xantham gum, ~0.3% Guar gum, or ~0.35% locust bean (carob) gum.

 

I've got a blend written down somewhere, just have to find it. Xanthan gum is pretty easy to get retail. The celiacs use it instead of gluten.

post #5 of 18

Maybe this link to Vegan Ingredients will be of help...

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

   I have used just xanthan gum before, I just don't have the guar or locust bean gum handy to mix in.  Sometimes the minimum order on those things are rather large.

Thanks for the input.

post #7 of 18

Modified Tapioca starch

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 18

This may be a dumb question, but do you actually NEED a stabilizer to make sorbet?

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefpeon View Post

This may be a dumb question, but do you actually NEED a stabilizer to make sorbet?



Unless you're going to spin it every service or have a paco, I say yeah, to get the highest quality.

post #10 of 18

So did you try the modified tapioca starch? Did it work?

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

No, I didn't try the tapioca starch.  But I did find out that Chef Rubber brand stabilizer is vegan, so I may order that.

post #12 of 18

Here's what I use:

 

22 g guar gum
8 g xanthan gum
70 g glucose powder

 

Gives me the same results as the Cremodan.

 

You can buy small quantities of guar gum and xanthan from Barry Farm here: http://www.barryfarm.com/thickeners.htm . Some Whole Foods will also carry guar and xanthan for the gluten free people.

.

post #13 of 18

Some sorbets with a high fruit fiber cotnent don't need a stabilizer, i.e raspberry, pear, or cherry.  Some, like lemon, need something to bulk them up.

Not a stabilizer, but fiber, as in natural fiber that raspberries naturally contain.

 

You can go the stabilizer and funny chemicals route, but I'm with Chefpeon on natural ingredients.  Starch is one, but an even more unrefined form of starch is what I use in "thin" sorbets like lemon or lime.

 

Rice.

 

Regular Thai long grain rice.

 

I trust you've had congee?

 

I learned this trick from a very southern Italian:  Make a syrup from sugar, water, lemon juice,zest, lemongrass,lime leaf, etc, and add in the raw rice.  Basically boil the crap out of it, blend smooth and strain.  "Freshen" or brighten up with fresh lemon juice/zest and freeze.

 

Guaranteed vegan..... 

 

 

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #14 of 18

Haha!

 

I was thinking of trying glutinous rice as a stabilizer since waxy starches are more freeze stable. Good to know it works with long grain rice.

post #15 of 18

You should try a solution made of powdered guar (or clusterbean) and water. You don't need much, we blend about 2 tablespoons into a quart of water for a nice, this jelly like consistency.Then use only a 1/2 cup or so to a gallon of mixture.

Totally natural, odorless and tasteless and is tolerated well by celiacs and vegans.

Works great with our pops and adds a beautiful, silky mouthfeel.

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post #16 of 18

Starches and rice will work as stabilizers for sorbets but there are drawback vs. gelling agents:

 

- Starches do not have good flavor release, so the fresh flavor of the fruit will be a dulled and not as clean. Think of the flavor of canned pie filling.

- Starches are not as freeze/thaw stable. If storing frozen products for more than a couple days they will take on a kind of "spongy" texture.

 

That said, cornstarch is a traditional stabilizer for gellato in some regions of Italy. It gives the ice cream a dense, creamy mouthfeel, but gellato is meant to be eaten very fresh - usually the day it's spun.

 

I totally agree with foodpump about fiber content leading to a better texture (though I would still use some stabilizer for other reasons). If you don't want to use commercial stabilizers, then I would suggest using pectin rather than a starch. Pectin will give the sorbet some body while having much better flavor release than starch, though not as freeze/thaw stable as stabilizer gelling agents.

 

And as for using "funny chemicals", most gelling agents used for stabilizers are as "natural" as refined white sugar (sucrose). Xanthan gum is made from fermented corn syrup, locust bean gum is made from ground locust beans (otherwise known as carob), guar gum is the ground endosperm of the guar bean, and carrageenan is made from seaweed. The main reason for using more than one in a blend is they can have synergistic qualities when used in combination that improve the gel texture - using just one like xanthan or guar can make the texture "snotty" really fast.

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 

These are some great suggestions. I definitely want to do some taste comparisons.  You guys are the best!

post #18 of 18

I have heard of people using Slippery Elm Bark, finely powdered.

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