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coconut syrup

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I live in Hawaii and make candied coconut, ginger and dried fruit at the Farmers Markets here. When I make the candied coconut or ginger I have a lot of syrup left over which has reached the 'thread' stage and is a wonderful golden color. I do not know what the proportion of water to sugar is at this temperature (230 F). It tastes wonderful! I would like to market it, but when I let it cool, it's a very thick syrup and it inevitably crystalizes which to me means that there is not enough water in it for it to be a good pancake syrup. I'm thinking I should delute it back down with water, but how much? I would need to be able to judge the right amount of delution by the lowering of the temperature of the boiling syrup since I don't have a brix meter. And about that crystalization, people who buy from me are a little leary of corn syrup, so I don't want to use it to keep the crystalization at bay (it is also really expensive here). Can I use just cream of tartar? Again, how much say for two gallons of syrup. (Also, I can't make any hard candy from the syrup cause all the yummy things that make it taste so good start to burn at about 240 F.) I would be really grateful for any help --I have been experimenting but I had to throw this syrup in the bushes too often, seems such a shame. Aloha, Joan

post #2 of 8

There are cane syrups. There are also glucose and other types of syrups out there made from stuff other then corn, if it's really a big deal.

 

You can make your own trimoline by cooking sugar, water, and acid (including cream of tartar).

 

Also honey.

 

Sugar syrups are at about 80% solids if their boiling point is 230 deg f.

post #3 of 8

Can it be used for ice cream topping, if kept warm or added to hot fudge (coconut fudge sunday)?

In cookies or cake or icings?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 8

I'd thin it a little and add it to my coke.

 

Could also see making fudge with it.

 

I bet it would make a killer turkish delight type candy.

post #5 of 8

Or coconut/ginger marshmallows. Heat it to the thread stage, then beat it into bloomed and melted gelatin.

Beat until cool and thick, then spread it into a pan heavily dusted with confectioners' sugar and dust some on top.

Allow it to cool and firm up, then cut with a knife or scissors sprayed with pan release.

 

Those would be very cool marshmallows indeed!

 

 

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for the information. It is wonderful on cakes and on ice cream just as it is, yum. I do make marshmallows, but darn, cause they are so fluffy, we can't sell enough to use up all the syrup and the heat here makes them hard to present well, they tend want to squish down at little. Still delish, though. I'll look into turkish candy, I haven't eaten any ever, so this should be fun. I am still gung hoe on the syrup idea so 'Trimoline' is the magic word and wikipedia and google lead me from there to how to make it and help with the syrup idea.  One further question: if, at thread stage the syrup is about 80% solids, at what temperature would the syrup be 50% solids? Hmmm. Just thought about this..... I'll make a simple syrup and see at what temperature it boils at. Wish I could send you all a few marshmallows. Thanks so much again! --- Joan

post #7 of 8

Aloha Joan!  So nice to see another local girl here!

I too tried to make marshmallows in we still lived in Kaneohe, but they just went to mush.

I think that the Turkish Delight would sell well at the Farmer's Market to Hawaii's palate.

Where is it that you vend your candies?  LOVE coconut candy!!  So miss the ONO foods in Hawaii :sob:

post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 

Ah, marshmallows. We are on the wet side of the Big Island and sell at the Maku'u, Hilo and Waimea markets. I only make marshmallows for Waimea -they do turn to mush with too much humidity at the other markets. It sound like you have left the Islands. Sad, but now you can make all kinds of candies you couldn't living in the rain. Alton Brown has a good base recipe for marshmallows, find it on the net. If you need a recipe for coconut candy, let me know. So easy. Haven't really gotten into turkish delight yet. Any suggestions for using up the dang syrup always appreciated! Aloha. Joan

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