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Tipping on gross or net sales of bill

Poll Results: Do you tip on the net sales amount or the gross sales amount (tip on tax)

 
  • 76% (10)
    Net Sales (Why would I tip on taxes)
  • 23% (3)
    Gross Sales (I am a high roller and I tip on the taxed amount)
13 Total Votes  
post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

When you tip do you tip on the net sales (amount before tax) or the amount after tax? There was an old thread about this from 2006 but only two replies. I am resurrecting this topic to find out what everyone does. We constantly have a discussion about this when we go out with friends.

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Nicko 
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post #2 of 28

Net. I usually double the tax, unless I'm at a regular haunt, then I overtip a little.

post #3 of 28

20% of the net. Like thetincook, I overtip if at a reg. haunt.

post #4 of 28

I must be the only one too lazy to do the math.

 

I use 20% as my base tip, increasing or decreasing as the case may be. But I base it on the total, and, in most cases, round up.

 

For instance, if the total (gross) bill is $57, 20% would be $11.40. For satisfactory but not exceptional service I would leave 12 bucks on the table.

 

Here in Kentucky the tax is 6%. So, on the above example, the net would be $53.58. Take 20% of that and the tip is $10.67---which results in an actual tip of $11. I'm not going to sit there playing accountent over a lousy buck.

 

Do the rest of you really do it differently? I mean, whether figured on the net or the gross, if the tip comes out to odd change to you actually leave the exact amount (in my example, $11.40) for the server?

 

I also never put the tip on plastic. Stems from my days as a server, when how much I actually made was something between me and the IRS.

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post #5 of 28

15-20% (depending on the service with exceptions on a slow kitchen) on the net bill, including alcohol.  My husband use to figure it with the out the booze until I explained that the wait staff has to share their tips with the bar, that is correct right?  I mean about sharing the tip? 

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post #6 of 28
Thread Starter 

I am still scratching my head as to why it is now 20%. Growing up as a kid it was always 15%. To me there is the following types of service:

 

  • Ok service - 10% - server showed up served your food but did not do anything exceptional.
  • Good service - 15% - server was attentive, looked for opportunities to go above and beyond. 
  • Excellent service - 20%+ - server truly went above and beyond. Much attention to details. 

 

 

I have been to little burger joints and had a great server and tipped 30% without even blinking. On the other hand I have been to high end restaurants where the server made me feel like they were doing me a favor and I will only leave 15% and even that I don't feel is deserved.

 

To me tip on the net it is fair to both.

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #7 of 28

15% + or - depending on service, after alcohol but before tax.


Edited by abefroman - 9/8/11 at 9:55am
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

I am still scratching my head as to why it is now 20%. Growing up as a kid it was always 15%. 

 

Good point Nicko! 

My husband and I started to talk about this thread over breakfast this morning; he feels that it was the restaurant owner/operators who first started the 20% tip by suggesting this to the patrons.

Another thought on tipping:

Recently we had family staying with us and we all went out to lunch, 5 adults and two children, 2 and 3 years old. 

The check had a 18% gratuity added (the manager told us we had more than 6 people at our table) to the bill without the server saying anything to us.  Thank goodness my husband caught that one! 

But I mean, how do you figure two small kids count as making up a party of 7? 

What service did you provide to them?  

They brought their own food and coloring books, the wait staff didn't even bring them a drink, they had their sippy cups.   



 

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

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post #9 of 28

don't forget to tip on the total before any discounts or coupons, the servers get taxed on their net sales before any discounts.

 

From wikipedia.com:

Tipping is customary in restaurants having traditional table service. As tipped employees generally qualify for a lower statutory minimum wage from the employer, tips in some states constitute the majority of the income for tipped workers such as wait staff. While opinions vary, Fodor's suggests that tipping wait staff 15% of the bill (before tax) is considered standard for adequate service, or up to 20% for excellent service

post #10 of 28

I tip on the total amount of the bill.  I don't bother with the "pre tax" amount.  When it comes down to it, unless you have spent hundreds on the meal whether you tip pre tax or post tax really makes very little difference (15% of 5-6%).  As for the amount I usually tip anywhere from 15-20% depending on the service, although poor service will see less of a tip.

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post #11 of 28

I always tip double the taxes.  In our area, 9 1/2% is common for taxes.  This is given for standard service.  My husband says this means his drink is filled everytime he ask.  If the server anticipates his needs this is excelent service and deserves something extra.  We do tip on plastic sometimes and we do tell the manager when our server deserves the extra money.

post #12 of 28

15% on the net as the absolute minimum, even if service was lackluster -- it's how the server makes a living.  Usually 18-20%.  

 

Regular hangouts 20%; inexpensive places like diners, 20-25%.  

 

All plastic, I'm afraid.  I've just about stopped carrying cash.  

post #13 of 28
Thread Starter 

I don't think it matters whether it is on the plastic or cash. The server has the obligation to report their income taxes. 

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #14 of 28

I generally tip about 15 - 20% on the total bill.  Exceptional service gets more.

post #15 of 28

Neither....

 

I start at $00 (£00)

and if the greeting is good i add an appropriate amount on normally (£2) $4

then the better or more i enjoy service i will keep adding an amount onto this. if something happens or does something i don't like i take some £/$ off.

 

On a 2 course meal lasting around 2 hours costing around $100 (£50) i would usually tip between $15 (£7) and $45 (£20) if its bad service i usually tip around £0.50p or $1 this being an insult to staff.

 

As a waiter myself the more someone tips the better the service was, the less the tip i think i could have done better.

post #16 of 28

We started leaving the tip in cash so that the server has instant cash in their pocket. 

It seemed to me that the owner/operator/manager maybe didn’t give them

their fair share at the end of their shift from the till if we left our gratuity on the plastic. 

Maybe someone can shed some light on that one for me. 

This place that we use to go to added the tip on after we had written a zero on our ticket and left it as cash, twice!  We don’t go there anymore.

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

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post #17 of 28


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kieron19 View Post

Neither....

 

I start at $00 (£00)

and if the greeting is good i add an appropriate amount on normally (£2) $4

then the better or more i enjoy service i will keep adding an amount onto this. if something happens or does something i don't like i take some £/$ off.

 

On a 2 course meal lasting around 2 hours costing around $100 (£50) i would usually tip between $15 (£7) and $45 (£20) if its bad service i usually tip around £0.50p or $1 this being an insult to staff.

 

As a waiter myself the more someone tips the better the service was, the less the tip i think i could have done better.


Wow that's terrible.

 

Not how you tip, but how far the Dollar has fallen in value :)

 

I also consider the level of service I have received, and though having to rely on tips for my income in the past as well I do not over tip bad service (that is just wrong), will over tip considerably for service that excels, and do not feel bad for a server that may have chosen the wrong career path and receives low tips due to poor service. There are just certain individuals who do not belong to be working with people, and I do not feel obligated to leave them any certain amount of money for trying to make me as miserable as they are. Those who do just the opposite deserve the difference added on top though.

 

Typically  though I almost always immediately figure what 15% is in my head (sorry to those who find it tough, but just comes to me for some reason, and more a curse than gift) and then consider the experience when deciding, One thing I do dislike is a reduced tip due to things beyond a servers control like sub standard or poor food, dirty establishment, or even under staffing. I know many will reduce for those things and I honestly do feel the urge, but if the server does it right I am not comfortable making them take the hit for it etc. and will just not return.

 

Now there are times where 15% or 20% does not work for me and I have left a tip near or similar to the bill. I say this because I see people leaving change on the table when they get good service, and take up a table, but end up with a $6 bill from a breakfast special or something similar. I just do not find it right to leave .90 for a tip just because you went with the special as the server still had to service you etc. Maybe it is just me but I find I have to leave at least a few dollars.

 

Maybe I put too much value on the experience, but I really do believe that pretty much anyone can take your order and throw your food on the table, but those who make it a pleasant experience and leave you wanting for nothing really deserve to be rewarded for it, and those who do not put in that same effort need to handled accordingly.

 

Oh and never ever never tip on tax. :)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

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post #18 of 28

Here our tax is about 15% so I add a few dollars to whatever the tax comes up to.

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post #19 of 28

We have a unique tax structure in the area. If you dine with-in our city limits, the tax on food is 10% and every where else is between 5 and 7%. Because of this we find it necessary to be very aware where the place we are eating at is located. Regarding the net or gross, it is normally off the net and when using coupons or discount cards we tip off the net before the discount was applied.

post #20 of 28

some customers just tip on the food amount...not the wine or the tax....we are outside the city limits here and our tax is 3% less than  in town...the resort/luxury tax at the ski mountain is 10%, so people that tip on the taxed amount really get fleeced.....if you are staying at the resort and are eating the majority of your meals out, it adds up.....for me, the tip should be based on food and service and tipping on the taxed amount may not be much unless you are with a large party. i just do 20% of the food cost...i feel that i am already paying an upcharge on wine....but as i said, it depends on the size of the party...if it's 2, it's not enough to worry about..if it's 8 is can be...guess it also depends if your a big roller!

joey

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post #21 of 28

last night we took  my Mom out to dinner at this place that had opened not too long ago and the three of us had 2 apps, 3 entrees, 2 desserts and 3 glasses of wine.  The wine was $21 with food portion being $76 and my husband left a $16 tip.  I'm still trying to figure out how he came to $16 for a tip, but he and I have been talking about this topic and I did remind him not to tip on the tax or alcohol.  Isn't the typical markup on booze 100%?  (btw the food was very mediocre at best)

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post #22 of 28

For most of my eating out--which is ethnic dives--I round the tip to the nearest whole dollar. This overtips sometimes and undertips others. But most of this happens at my "regular" places so it evens itself out.

 

When I'm spending more, I get more precise about it, but still tend to round to what work with easy math. Sometimes that mean's weird tip amounts down to cents if I'm playing with plastic. Others would find that math tedious I guess. 

post #23 of 28

I tip on the alcohol as well as the food, partly because I have learned to consult waitfolk on wine choices.  Sure the restaurant marks it up, but that's the business, and I benefit from a curated collection of wines that I can try by the glass.

 

It's interesting that current and former waiters are among the most critical, but you all probably spot flaws in service that I miss.

post #24 of 28

Where i work At the moment for covers under 5 we do not add a tip on. For covers 6 or over (under 20) we put a optional 12% on (which not many people ask to be removed) for over 20 covers (people) when booking we charge them for the F/B (food and beverage) and a table charge of between £100 and £150 mainly because they get a room to their selves and 2 waiters. this 100£ to 150$ is the best way to ensure a fair tip and if their is like say 35 people its only £2.85 each

 

 

post #25 of 28

Tax has nothing to do with anythng the server has done for me,  so I tip on the pre-tax amount,  even though the difference may be slight.  That having been said, I usually ignore the percentage rule of thumb,  and tip according to how the server did (or didn't) improve my dining experience.  

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post #26 of 28

My math skills suck monkey butt so using the tax amount is a great help for me... 

 

Mind you if the service sucks  I will still tip, just not as much as I would if the service was good.  I suspect most places tip out the kitchen and it isn't the kitchen's fault the servers are doing a bad job.

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post #27 of 28

20% of the bill, including tax.  I only round up, never down.  If the service or food is exceptionally good, the tip calculation changes accordingly.  I seldom tip less for bad service, although I will complain to the server and to the management if the server doesn't take me seriously or offer, in some way, to "make it right."   People who take responsibility for their screw ups deserve some encouragement.  Everybody messes up, it's what you do about it which says the most. 

 

The one thing that will make me deduct from the tip is the server telling me the problem, whatever it was, was my fault.  While I accept responsibility, I don't pay for blame.  They can pay me.

 

I never tip less than $5 for anything, even a glass of water, except for take out. 

 

For take out, I tip less; usually just put the change in the glass if it's not too much -- say between $0.50 and $3.  An espresso bar is not take out, even if you get the coffee to go, it's a bar.  If the take-out is special food which demands a lot from the kitchen, I might tip more. 

 

I tip the delivery guys for the delivery, not for the food.  All of our places are within three minutes, so I tip $5, whether the bill is $10 or $50.  I'll tip more for a longer drive or if there's something unusual about the order.  The idea that someone's going to spend 15 or 20 minutes taking care of my order for minimum wage is not acceptable. 

 

Unless something very unusual happened, I feel it's in bad taste to call attention to myself with the tip.

 

If the place is a real favorite, I'll buy the owner a bottle and the staff a case for the holidays.  Sushi bars used to cost me a lot, because I bought a bottle of good whiskey  for each sushi man, but I only have one sushi-ya and two sushi men to which I currently feel loyalty.  We often get gifts from our favorite places, too.

 

I don't tip more at places we frequent with the expectation that they'll treat us better next time.  The tip is not contractual, it's gratuitous (hence, a "gratuity").  I tip what I feel is fair and generous because that's what I expect from myself.

 

BDL

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post #28 of 28

I usually tip on the after tax amount - 20%

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