or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chicken Marsala

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I want to make it.  How 70's of me.  My question is do I use sweet marsala wine or dry?  Any good recipes?  Would love a modern twist to it as well.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #2 of 13

Dry marsala all the way. Sweet marsala would be WAY too sweet once reduced.

 

http://rouxbe.com/recipes/1544 (no need to subscribe, just click 'text recipe' below the video box) - that's the recipe I followed and I liked the result although I always wish there was more sauce. licklips.gif

post #3 of 13

kk, 

i have a veal marsala on the menu, but do it the same way with chicken... i use dry marsala, cremini mushrooms, diced proscuitto and cream....not sure it's any sort of twist but everyone sure seems to enjoy it. its all in the sauce, which is in the marsala, so get a decent one, doesn't have to be top shelf, but don't get the cheapest either...it'll make all the difference...i use florio brand... aah,such a wonderful simple dish.    a salute...

joey


Edited by durangojo - 9/13/11 at 3:34pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #4 of 13

This is my version of Chicken Marsala that goes over very well in our house.  My hubby is American-Italian and thinks that if it doesn't have red sauce on it, it's not Italian, yeah right brother.  We have a Trader Joe's not too far away from us, so I buy Incanto Dry Marsala (under $5) which is from Italy.

I remember reading somewhere that it's best to use Marsala from Italy, that it's the real stuff, no additives and such.  As DurangoJo was saying, you could use veal, chicken or my inlaws use pork.

 

4 boneless-skinless Chicken thighs (or breasts), cut into bit size pieces

¼ C Flour

½ tsp Salt

1 tsp Pepper

8 oz sliced Crimini Mushroom

½ small Onion or 2 small Shallots, diced fine

1 Garlic clove, minced

¾ C dry Marsala Wine

1 ¼ C Chicken broth

2 Tbsp Butter

2 Tbsp Olive Oil

 

In a large pan heat EVOO, sauté mushrooms until brown, remove to a bowl.  Add more oil if needed along with a little butter for flavor and sweat onions until just translucent; add garlic & sauté until fragrant, transfer to a dish.  Toss chicken in flour salt & pepper, shaking off excess; brown, about 3 minutes per side; transfer to another plate.  Add wine and scarp up all brown bits, reduce, pour in broth; add back onions and mushrooms to the pan and bring to a bubble.  Swirl in 2 Tbsp of butter and reduce for a few minutes; add back in the chicken and simmer for about 5 minutes until sauce thickens further.  Serve over pasta or polenta, also nice with roasted potatoes.

 

Mangiamo!

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #5 of 13
Kanehogirl -- looks good! A minor technique tweak -- always brown your protein first before moving on to the aromatics and mushrooms. It leaves fond in the pan, which helps flavor everything else. They leave fond as well -- so the fond becomes very complex and aromatic, and when you finally do deglaze -- wow.

True even if you (lightly) flour the chicken first.

Just a "cooking fundamental" thing which you might like to try.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #6 of 13

kgirl,

well, i personally use cutlets and do everything right in the pan to stay...no sauteeing and moving them out and so forth and putting them back...it seems like you lose a lot of the good stuff...it's a pretty quick dish to make..you just gotta do it in the right order... i also don't put any herbs in my version at all...don't know why...just doesn't seem to call for it to me...but then again, as everyone here always says..'that's just me'....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

I was thinking right along those lines in terms of recipes so thank you.  I like the addition of proscuitto durangojo, and I like the bit of lemon as well French Fries.  I wonder if I can combine those ideas without it becoming too muddled.

 

Damn, the guy at the liquor store swore up and down that I have to use sweet marsala so I bought it but now cannot return it. 

 

Kanegirl, you must tell your husband to visit Italy one day and see for himself that very few dishes are smothered with red sauce, in fact I can't recall having any red sauce in any of the homes I visited there except when having pizza and even then there were many options without red sauce.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 13

Dry Marsala all he way. I make simiar to the way described  further back. I pound my chicken a bit for even cooking, trim all yellow fat off and dredge & saute chicken first then the rest in same pan.  I use shallots only and a hint of garlic.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #9 of 13

sometimes the liqour store will take back a bottle if it's unopened...if it were me, i'd keep it and make zabaglione, to serve with fresh berries...maybe not the same meal though as the chicken marsala...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

sometimes the liqour store will take back a bottle if it's unopened...if it were me, i'd keep it and make zabaglione, to serve with fresh berries...maybe not the same meal though as the chicken marsala...

joey



Good idea!  I asked the liquor store and they said it is illegal in NY state to return liquor.

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #11 of 13

yeah cowgirl!! 

zabaglione would make the perfect sweet ending to that meal...

veal marsala over creamy polenta, finshed off with strong coffee and fresh berries topped with a HUGE spoonful of the yummy, creamy, custard-y sauce

AAHHH, what about a starter though?

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #12 of 13



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Kanehogirl -- looks good! A minor technique tweak -- always brown your protein first before moving on to the aromatics and mushrooms. It leaves fond in the pan, which helps flavor everything else. They leave fond as well -- so the fond becomes very complex and aromatic, and when you finally do deglaze -- wow.

True even if you (lightly) flour the chicken first.

Just a "cooking fundamental" thing which you might like to try.

BDL



 

bdl,

good point...

I've always made this recipe in this order, but I will try it the way that you and durangojo suggest for a better fond

 

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post





Good idea!  I asked the liquor store and they said it is illegal in NY state to return liquor.

 


We have a rather large liquor store here in Upstate NY and I returned a bottle of something I bought once. It wasn't wine. They balked at first but took it back (Opened as well) I don't think people usually return liquor so they don't make it a policy but they didn't say anything about it being illegal.I know it's legal and up to the discretion of the store owner as to whether they accept returns or exchanges of unopened bottles. They don't say anything about opened bottles.

 

My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking