New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Career path crossroads. - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SquirrelRJ View Post

That's why everyone is entitled to their own opinions!

 

IMO, that point can be conveyed without using such a method, much better ways to motivate... they didn't make the movie because the guy was a even keeled chef who is a great leader.

 

I'm in agreement, instead: "Do that once more and you will be terminated for insubordination!"

 

Much clearer, no physical threat, and certainly easier to carry out. Besides, no unemployment to worry about wink.gif
 

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #32 of 36

Basilskite, do call the chef before you go and talk to him / her. 2pm on a saturday may be a good time, but it depends always on how busy they expect to be. Restaurants are heading into the busiest time of year, with the various holidays and Christmas approaching, so you may want to plan your visit. This also demonstrates that you are sensitive to their schedule. I used to hate it when job applicants called me during service, and I'm still sensitive to never call a chef at that time unless he or she asks me to. One option would be to target specific operations which are of interest to you, do your research as to who is who in it, and then approach them and explain to them why you want to work for them, and nobody else. Much more effective than just "looking for a job". Once you have made contact, offer to do a "working interview" where they get to try you out for a day - or evening, and you get to try them, too. This works for some operations, however some large organizations are a bit leery because of liability. I'd check into it, anyway. Good luck, and let us know how it goes.

post #33 of 36
I'm in a similar position. Graduated with a B.S in business and after a year doing accounting and administrative stuff I realize I want to get into cooking. I'm going to be doing a culinary program shortly and hope that it's something I enjoy professionally. If cooking burns me out hopefully my business background will help me get into restaurant management. I think your psych degree could help with that as well because I've worked with a lot of people in the business field that have psych degrees. It's a good general education to have for a variety of things.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

I'm in agreement, instead: "Do that once more and you will be terminated for insubordination!"

 

Much clearer, no physical threat, and certainly easier to carry out. Besides, no unemployment to worry about wink.gif

 

I haven't seen the movie, so I can't say if this was the first time the cooks made this particular mistake or not. In any case, an HR person will tell you that as an employer you have an obligation to provide guidance and remedial opportunity before terminating an employee. Some jurisdictions have grace periods during which you can terminate an employee for no specific reason, and these vary from 30 days to six months from the start date. After that, an employee has a right not to be terminated without cause. At the very least he or she will be entitled to severance, and even then there may be grounds for a wrongful dismissal claim. Every employee has a right to be properly trained for the expectations of the particular job and it is up to the employer to prove that reasonable steps have been taken to allow the employee to perform to the expected standard. I would be hesitant to tell a cook "do this again and you're fired" if it is a first or second mistake. Documentation is everything. This, of course, does not apply to serious situations such as theft, assault, fraud, etc...

 

 

post #35 of 36

 

Don't think I've ever worked in a restaurant that tip-toed through all the legalities. No breaks, or shorter breaks than labor laws allow, lower than minimum wage pay or daily salary style paycheques, shit like that happens all the time in this industry. I don't know what magical kitchens you guys have been working in where there's severance, standard hours, standard wages, documentation, and inappropriate conduct ("threats", inappropriate jokes, etc) isn't tolerated. 

 

post #36 of 36
Thread Starter 

'
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chef KDSimpson View Post

I've been in and out of the industry myself. I had a office job for a little while there working as a data analyst and applications tester (being paid very well for it) but the hospitality industry has always called me back. It seems a shame to not use your Phsyc Degree but I'm sure everything you learnt will set you up for the hospitality industry and better set you up for dealing with lots of different personality types. 

 

Reality Check: If you're worried about turning 40 and feeling like you have missed out on something then I'm sure that you're going feel that way regardless of what path you take. You just need to make a firm decision and stick with it. I can almost guarantee that the people you meet in hospitality can be just as close friends as any other business, perhaps even more. 

 

There is so much to experience out there and you'd be surprised at how much more can be opened up when your hours are more flexible.

 

At the end of the day, depending on how hard you're willing to work, you can move to any position and get all the things you want, weekends and night off and a decent pay rate. But you need to know what you want and have the balls to ask for it. Remember: You don't get if you don't ask.

 

Anyway I hope that helps.  

KDSimpson

 

 
 

This made things much more clear to me.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steelbanger View Post

Basilskite, do call the chef before you go and talk to him / her. 2pm on a saturday may be a good time, but it depends always on how busy they expect to be. Restaurants are heading into the busiest time of year, with the various holidays and Christmas approaching, so you may want to plan your visit. This also demonstrates that you are sensitive to their schedule. I used to hate it when job applicants called me during service, and I'm still sensitive to never call a chef at that time unless he or she asks me to. One option would be to target specific operations which are of interest to you, do your research as to who is who in it, and then approach them and explain to them why you want to work for them, and nobody else. Much more effective than just "looking for a job". Once you have made contact, offer to do a "working interview" where they get to try you out for a day - or evening, and you get to try them, too. This works for some operations, however some large organizations are a bit leery because of liability. I'd check into it, anyway. Good luck, and let us know how it goes.


Ok I'll keep all that in mind. A coworker from that restaurant job I worked at got her position by coming in and asking. But I'm sure not everybody is ok with that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiz View Post

I'm in a similar position. Graduated with a B.S in business and after a year doing accounting and administrative stuff I realize I want to get into cooking. I'm going to be doing a culinary program shortly and hope that it's something I enjoy professionally. If cooking burns me out hopefully my business background will help me get into restaurant management. I think your psych degree could help with that as well because I've worked with a lot of people in the business field that have psych degrees. It's a good general education to have for a variety of things.
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

That's good to know. Good luck with your endeavor Whiz!
 

 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs