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Peeling Garlic. Anybody try this? - Page 2

post #31 of 46

I am continuously amazed at what I can learn here! Eleven years, and I'm constantly in awe......

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post #32 of 46

Please understand I am not telling people not to be careful. You should always follow good medical advice.

 

But it is also important to have the correct perspective:

 

I don't remember where I have seen statistics for botulism death from eating garlic, I seen to think it is not many.

 

I do remember automotive death is 33,000 per year.

 

Should we be driving at all?

 

dcarch

post #33 of 46

Tried it out today with my persnickety small hard neck garlic.  I used a 3 liter saucepan which I would then use for making tomato chili sauce for tamales

 

It does work with caveats. Large cloves pop free OK. Smaller cloves need more/longer agitation. Sufficiently small cloves (of which this specific garlic produced a lot this year)  do not work at all. I cleaned three heads to generate the equivalent of a normal head  of grocery store garlic.

 

A technique worth having in your repetoire, but not the universal solution to garlic peeling.

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post #34 of 46

Chef Bubba ! 

Not exactly the most sanitary thing to do., but times change. When you and I were young there was about 10 reported food poisonings heard of  IN A YEAR  now there are hundreds. 18 people DEAD so far from the latest cantaloupe fiasco.

Chef EdB
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      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #35 of 46

The things that used to happen 20-30 yrs ago......There was no real emphasis or training on food safety back then. Cross contamination was about it.

Gloves???? Those were only used when you worked with some type of real caustic cleaner.

 

And patching up other peoples wounds bare handed with no worries... Now you wear a full bio hazard suit.

 

Just think of some of the things that were normal practices back then, and try to do that today!

post #36 of 46

Actually garlic has antiseptic qualities in it's make up.  I would thing it almost impossible for botulism to find a place to grow in mashed garlic cloves.

post #37 of 46

And you'd be wrong. Clostridium is happily at home in garlic.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #38 of 46

Where would you like to deposit your ashes? One of few things that stop bot is acid matter base , like tomato.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #39 of 46

From Wikipedia:

 

Medicinal use and health benefits

In in vitro studies, garlic has been found to have antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activity. However, these actions are less clear in vivo. Garlic is also claimed to help prevent heart disease (including atherosclerosis, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure) and cancer.[28]

 

Not trying to start an argument but it does have antibacterial components.  I can't say what happens when a cook tampers with it, adding oils, heating it or what have you. 

post #40 of 46

from the Mayo Clinic website

 

Food-borne botulism
The source of food-borne botulism is often home-canned foods that are low in acid, such as green beans, corn and beets. A common source of the illness in Alaska is fermented seafood. However, the disease has also occurred from chili peppers, baked potatoes and oil infused with garlic. When you eat food containing the toxin, it disrupts nerve function, causing paralysis.

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post #41 of 46

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

And you'd be wrong. Clostridium is happily at home in garlic.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Mac View Post

From Wikipedia:

 

Medicinal use and health benefits

In in vitro studies, garlic has been found to have antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activity. However, these actions are less clear in vivo. Garlic is also claimed to help prevent heart disease (including atherosclerosis, high cholesterol, and high blood pressure) and cancer.[28]

 

Not trying to start an argument but it does have antibacterial components.  I can't say what happens when a cook tampers with it, adding oils, heating it or what have you. 


Yes, I was broad with my initial statement. I didn't mean a blanket denial of it's features, just as applies to Clostridium.

 

Clostridium is ubiquitous in soil. It's in/on just about all vegetables. Even honey. . And safe for the most part. As long as it's metabolizing oxygen, it's safe to eat--except for babies who have a low acid gut which won't kill it so babies shouldn't eat honey until they're more than a year old.  So pH is important as chefed mentioned.  But we eat it all the time in salads and so forth.

 

So it's safe to make garlic vinegars for example or let our gut do it's job with it's harsh pH.

 

But when you put garlic in a low/no oxygen environment as in an oil, Clostridium changes it's metabolism and keeps on living anaerobically. But now it produces Botulinin toxin as a by product.

 

Heat can kill Clostridium, but the spores survive to produce new Clostridium once the temp drops. This is why garlic oil is dangerous. People think that heating it makes it safe in a pasteurzation sense, but it doesn't in this case. Commercial producers of garlic oil use heat, pressure and preservatives.

 

For home use, you can be safe by making small amounts, keeping it refrigerated between uses and using it up or discarding it within a week.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #42 of 46

As was explained to me, it is not clostridium botulinum that is the danger, it is the toxin(s) produced by clostridium botulinum under anaerobic conditions. Heat may kill clostridium botulinum or force it into the spore state, but heat does nothing to the toxin(s) except make them hot. The toxin(s) will still affect the nervous system.

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post #43 of 46

Pete you are right there really is no such thing as botulism poisoning. It is an offshoot of the toxens caused by the spores under ideal conditions.

 

Like people say E-Coli and I ask which one ? As there are many strains and forms of it

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Mac View Post

Actually garlic has antiseptic qualities in it's make up.  I would thing it almost impossible for botulism to find a place to grow in mashed garlic cloves.



 

Garlic has been used as a anti biotic during wars from what I have read. I had a case of MRSA a few year back caused by a girlfriend that lived in filth and I used a garlic based natural cure as well as the prescribed bactrim, knocked it out on the second outbreak and have been free of it for 3 years. Another friend who had the same infection for 6 years after a motorcycle accident added the garlic to his last outbreak and he is now clear of it for over a year. Garlic is powerful stuff and I doubt anything would grow in garlic alone.

post #45 of 46

I will try this method this weekend as I usually burn through a clove or two a day. I tried the cloves in a jar and threw it in the trash the first time I cooked with it, I will just stick to fresh.

post #46 of 46

A great technique that you must try.. cut the root end off the garlic and microwave for 15-30 seconds on high depending on the amount.. the skin comes right off. I didnt believe it at first I used to just cut the root and and smash or rub between mSUBMITy hands, but the microwave technique is amazing and doesnt cook it at all

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