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gluten free diets

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

i know the subject of gluten free foods and diners has been hacked to death here, but after yet another special dinner modification last night, which i certainly have no problem with, it got me to thinking about what exactly happens if someone eats gluten? do their throats close up? turn blue? flushed face? what, maybe a little tummy ache? it's certainly not life threatening...so what is the big deal and what did people do 10 years ago when gluten free wasn't a common everyday trend? just curious..i know i could google it, but why, when i got you guys! thanks...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #2 of 12
Thread Starter 

anyone?

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #3 of 12

I deal with Celiacs a lot and from what they tell me their symptoms are more like bloating, nausea, headaches, and then comes the diareha  (sp) the next day.

post #4 of 12

My wife was diagnosed with Celiacs disease back in July. Previous to that her symptoms were mostly indigestion that were getting worse. Other symptoms can be seemingly totally unrelated. There is a link between seizures and CD as well. My wife has Temporal Lobe seizure disorder and going gluten free has possibly mitigated the seizures to some extent. It's hard to pinpoint for sure but it may be a factor. But since going gluten free she can eat somewhat spicier foods again more so than before. No more gas issues, heartburn and a lot of things that make eating pleasurable again.

My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #5 of 12

my celiac in the end manifested itself as "brain fog" constant lethargy(even though I slept up to 12 hours a day) vertigo, muscle spasms, anemia, vitamin malapsorption, bloating, weight gain, diarrhea, my immune system pretty much broke down - constant battle with any virus, they lasted for months, couldn't concentrate, anxiety(including awesome panic attacks). pretty much wondered why I was even alive. It took over 15 years for a diagnosis. Even now being gluten free for years my body is still not as healthy as it should be, if I get accidently glutened I pay for it with stomach issues.

celiac disease is different from a wheat allergy which would give you the breathing problems you describe. It's just life threatening in the long run. And it certainly isn't a little tummy ache. Wheat is like a slow poison to my system. Other people have more intense re-actions than I do all depends on your genes.

feel free to ask any questions, glad to help.

kathee

post #6 of 12

Celiac disease is a very serious illness, even if some people think it's just a little bloating and tummy ache. In most cases it has an impact on your whole body, not just the digestive system. The symptoms are different for each person affected by the disease but mostly it starts out with bloating. The bloating quickly reaches a level where you experience extreme pain in your lower belly, especially while sitting in a chair. Imagine sitting at your desk at work (for example) or on the train and you feel as if your belly is about to explode. Bloating is followed by diarrhea and if that goes on for some time your whole body can be affected by things like fatigue or malnutrition.

 

When you find out about the illness and change your diet in many cases it feels like a new life (almost). You feel the energy to do things you didn't want to do before and you aren't afraid of the bloating/diarrhea in public anymore. Changing your diet is very difficult at the beginning but it is definitely worth the troubles. It's just very important that you consequently stick to the rules and avoid gluten. 

 

Before doctors knew about this illness the symptoms were just attributed to different illnesses and were labeled as "chronic" condition. Thank god nowadays we know about the illness and can diagnose it properly. Even if people with celiac disease might be a bother to organize around sometimes, they are mostly very thankful for any effort made to help them.

post #7 of 12

I have Celiac Disease. When we come in contact with gluten it is not an immediate allergy attack like most food allergies. It is a systemic allergy response where the immune system begins to destroy the intestines and for 20% of Celiacs like me also the lymph system. A single exposure can cause symptoms and damage to happne for several days to several months and damage can happen internally even if no symptoms are present. For every 1 patient dx'd with Celiac they are fidning there is another 80  who have celiac and have not been tested because symptoms can mimic other illnesses and some poeple may only have a minor bout of diarrhea now and then. I had symptoms for 20 years before a doctor finally caught it and began testing. Bloodwork turned out negative because I also had another aotoimmune disease called Selective IgA Deficiency so no matter how much gluten I was exposed to the tests would always be negative because I lack the ability to produce those antibodies so biopsies were needed. Biopsies came back positive in several spots. Celiac can also cause stomach and intestinal cancer and lymphoma if untreated. The only cure for Celiac Disease is to maintain a STRICT gluten free lifestyle, not just diet because gluten can also be found in playdough, sheetrock, shampoo, laundry soap, cosmetics, fabric softener, medications, and lots more. Grains that contain gluten are wheat, rye, barley, kamut, spelt, and triticale. If a chef prepares a truly gluten free meal and the server just served bread to the previous customer and did not wash his/her hands well afterwards then s/he just contaminated the Celiac's plate. You can NEVER remove gluten from a wood surface so ALL cooking utensils cannot contain or touch wood because it takes 900*F to kill the gluten proteins and that kinda makes charcoal. Cast iron and other porous cooking utensils must go in the self clean cycle of an oven (which happens to reach 900-950*F). Bleach and hand sanitizer do NOT affect gluten. Plastics and nonstick surfaces with the tiniest scratches can harbor gluten proteins contaminating future meals. Gluten spores will remain airborns for 24-48 hours contaminating work surfaces. The FDA claims 20mg of gluten daily )about 1/8 tsp flour)  to be safe for most Celiacs but many will react with as little as 1mg daily. Coooking with gluten free ingredients is not enough, you also need a gluten free environment in order to serve a gluten free meal.

 

For me we know within 4-8 hours I have been glutened. I will have abdominal cramping, diarrhea, asthma, acid reflux, nausea/vomiting, dizziness, hands/feet numbness/tingling, my skin itches and burns, I get a rash on my face accompanied by tiny boils, extreme fatique (sometimes requiring 20 hours of sleep a day for several days), a lot of muscle pain and stiffness, headaches and migraines, coughing, fever, and other symptoms. My symptoms will last 3 days for a teeny tiny minute exposure and up to several weeks for a larger exposure.
 

post #8 of 12

Below is a complete list of Celiac Disease symptoms. Kids can also have ADHD symptoms and behavioral problems. Some people may only have 2-3 symptoms and some people like me will have over 100 of them.


abdominal bloating
abdominal pain
abnormal CBC tests
abnormal liver tests
absence of menses
... accumulation of abdominal fluid
acid reflux
acne like water blisters
allergic rhinitis
anemia
anorexia
anxiety
arthritis
aspirating
asthma
asthmatic or bronchial cough
audible bowel sounds
autism in offspring
birth defects of offspring
black or brown discoloration of the colon
bleeding/swollen gums
blepharitis
blistering skin
blood clotting problems
bloodshot eyes
bone pain
brain fog
bruising easily
bulky greasy stools
burning sensation in the throat
chromosome disorders in offspring
chronic fatigue syndrome
constipation
corns & calluses
cracking in the corners of the mouth
cracking or dryness of the lips
decrease of white blood cells
delayed menses
delayed puberty
dementia
dental enamel defects
depression
Dermatitis herpetiformis (skin rash characterized as intensely itchy skin
eruptions like red bumps and blisters. Burning, stinging and itching
is very bad. It appears in groups around the body, much like the
lesions of Herpes
diabetes
diarrhea
discolored teeth
disorders of the lymph nodes
dry brittle nails that chip easily
dry eyes or cornea
early menopause
edema (esp ankles and feet)
elevated IgE levels
energy loss
fat in the stool
fatigue
fibromyalgia
fibrosing alveolitis of the lung (body produces antibodies against
its own lung tissue, creates a dry cough and breathing
difficulty upon exertion)
fluid retention
foul smelling gas
gallbladder problems
general feeling of illness
gray or light tan colored stools
hair loss
headaches
hepatitis
high blood pressure
hives
IgA deficiency
incoordination and clumsiness, affecting balance and gait, limb
or eye movements and/or speech
impotence
inattentiveness
infertility
inflammation of the pancreas
insatiable appetite
irritable bowel syndrome
irritability
itchy skin
joint pain
kidney stones
lactose intolerance
large appetite
liver disease
liver disorders
lupus
lymphoma
memory problems
menstrual problems
migraines
miscarriages
mouth ulcers
muscle cramps
muscle spasms
muscle weakness
nail fungus
nausea
night blindness
numbness in hands or feet or legs
obesity
osteoporosis
painful intercourse
painful periods
pancreatic problems
peripheral neuropathy
plantar warts
potassium deficiency
psoriasis
purple or red spots under the skin (more so in elderly)
recurrent miscarriages
red-purple swellings on the legs and sometimes arms, with fever and joint pain
restless legs syndrome
rheumatoid arthritis
scaly dermatitis
seborrhea
seizures
severe anemia in pregnancy
short stature
skin rashes
sleep disorders
sore throat
sperm abnormalities
spleen disorders
stomach cancer
stools that float
stunted growth in children
swallowing problems
tendency towards allergies
thyroid disease
tingling in hands or feet
tremors
under active spleen
unexplained exhaustion
unexplained nose bleeds
unexplained weight loss or gain
vaginal dryness
vaginitis
vitamin deficiencies
vomiting
white flecks on fingernails

post #9 of 12

For those wanting to make sure your food is gluten free here is a list of possible sources of hidden gluten

artificial color

atta

baby powder

baking powder

barley

bath salt

beer

binder

bran

brewers yeast

bulgar

candy

caramel coloring

chewing gum

clarifying agents

clay

cleaning products

coloring

communion wafers

conditioner

cosmetics

cough syrup

curry powder

detergents

dextrins

dinkle

dog food

dry roasted nuts

einkorn

emmer

emulsifiers

envelopes (lickable)

face wash

farina

flavoring

fu

germ

glucose syrup

glue

graham

groats

hair spray

hing

hydrolized

hydrogenated

ice cream

instant coffee

kamut

kecap

ketchup

ketjap

latex gloves (dusted)

lipbalm

lipstick

lotion

lozenges

maida

malt

maltose

marinades

matzo

medications

miso

mouthwash

mustard

natural flavors

natural juices

nondairy creamer

oats

paints

pate

pie filling

playdough

processed meats

pudding

rubber gloves (dusted)

rye

seafood analogs

seasonings

seitan

shampoo

sheetrock

shredded cheese

sirimi

smoke flavoring

soap

soy sauce

spelt

stabilizers

stamps (lickable)

starch

stock cubes

sunscreen

tabbouleh

tabouli

teriyaki sauce

tocopherols

toothpaste

triticale

triticum

vegetable gum

vegetable protein

vegetable starch

vitamins

vulgare

wheat

white pepper

whole meal

post #10 of 12

Wow Kathleen, lots of eye opening info. Thank you so much.

 

I had no idea how how little I knew about safety concerns when cooking for people with Celiac Disease.

 

As a conscientious chef, when approached about gluten free requests, do you have any advice on how I should respond because obviously truly gluten free meals are beyond my capabilities at work.

 

Are most people with Celiac Disease aware of the improbablility of producing a truly gluten free meal in a commercial establishment?
 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 12

Cheflayne:

The list she posted is long, but much of it is not even food.

 

If you pay more attention to the sources of gluten rather than an overwhelming list of products, it'll be easier to handle and manage, IMHO.

I'm pretty sure you could take a walk through your kitchen walk-in and pantry and readily identify 90% of the products that contain gluten, with the other 10% being unsure of until you read the ingredient list.

That'll change if there's a lot of processed foods in your place, as opposed to being heavy on from-scratch cooking.  But even so...

Proteins, Produce, Rice...A pretty good start.

No Pasta, No flour.  No problem.

Not making light of this issue - it is a serious issue and we are in the service industry, and most of us will be as accomodating as possible.  But, it also doesn't have to be overwhelming or even challenging.  We just need to be educated and aware.  The rest is easy.  It's what we do.

post #12 of 12

Actually it was more the post before the one with the list that caught my attention.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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