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Made focaccia today..

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

Tried a new recipe that was highly rated.. http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/focaccia-bread/detail.aspx

 

I am extremely pleased with how well it turned out and thought I'd share the food porn! (click to see them full size)

 

Pm3qA.jpg

 

I like to eat it with olive oil and diced garlic/greek olives spooned over it like so

 

X2Hve.jpg

 

One thing that drives me nuts though.. I went and bought a commercial peel.. to make moving dough onto my pizza stone easier.. and it never releases for me.. I sprayed it with a lot of olive oil.. seems like maybe that is the wrong idea.. do I want it to be basically dry? I have semolina that I could use but I don't care for that on bread like focaccia. Maybe next time I can take the stone out and work the dough out on it.. that seems like an unsafe thing to do preheated at 450 deg.

post #2 of 19

A lot of people use corn meal  to slide the bread. With a wet dough like focaccia, or pizza, I use parchment paper. Even then, if the bread sat on the parchment paper, it can stick a bit as it wets through the parchment paper.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 19

Oiled parchment paper seems like the way to go.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

With parchment paper do you leave the paper on and put it onto the stone that way?

post #5 of 19

Yes. You can trim the edges if you're worried about the paper igniting. I've not had that problem though it gets brown and brittle. I have an electric oven if that matters. Perhaps with gas, I'd trim.

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

I wasn't really worried about that at 450.. but I would probably cut to size and form the dough on the paper. I was more concerned with whether the parchment paper would do anything funky by being in between the stone and the dough. I suppose as long as there is good even heat transfer that's all the stone is there for yea?

post #7 of 19

Trim after the dough is on the parchment. Much easier to match the size and not have slips, slops and oopsies.

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 19

That looks fantastic!

I haven't made focaccia yet, I really have to give it a try!

post #9 of 19

I think focaccia is usually made in an oiled pan rather than directly on a baking stone. Rather than making it directly on a stone and using a peel, you might try Nancy Silverton's method of using a round cake pan.

 

http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-masterclass-20110526,0,1188913.htmlstory

post #10 of 19

Another method is to start it on a pan, and after 5 minutes, by which point the dough should have firmed up, slide it off the pan onto the baking stone.  The peel is good for that.

post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin View Post

Another method is to start it on a pan, and after 5 minutes, by which point the dough should have firmed up, slide it off the pan onto the baking stone.  The peel is good for that.



Yea once I got it in the oven it was easy to get it out (to put the cheese on top about half way through) .. all good ideas. Thanks for the suggestions!

post #12 of 19

eastshores,

since you made such beautiful focaccia maybe you should try making pissaladiere. or have you?  very similar but kalamata olives, anchovy filets and carmelized onions are all baked into the dough...and you thought it couldn't get any better!!! you can google it or i can pm you if you're interested..again, nice...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

Wow.. no I've never even heard of it but it sounds like it would be great! I've got a few friends that like the strong mediterranean flavors I do (garlic, olives, feta, etc) so I'll have to give this a shot next time we have a get together. Thanks!

post #14 of 19

eastshores,

pissaladiere is basically the french answer to focaccia...i roast the onions for about 2 hours in the oven beforehand....don't know too many things better than simple roasted onions.....well,chocolate doesn't count of course!...i love simple rustica foods...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #15 of 19

Joey, you may have mixed up the french names pissaladière and fougasse (pronounce foo-gas).

A pissaladière is a french pizza, indeed with lots of onion + anchovis + black olives + thyme

A fougasse is a french bread, totally similar to focaccia, even both names are related. You could of course use the same ingredients of a pissaladière and turn it into a fougasse or facaccia.

 

I presented my own take of a pissaladière in the Recipe section a while ago. Mind you, a classic pissaladière is made with a pizzadough and a totally different pattern than the one I made here.

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/66992/pissaladi-re-my-way

post #16 of 19

yes cb,

you are quite right about pissaldiere being more of a pizza-onion tart then breadlike focaccia....my thinking was that eastshores would like the pissaladiere because of the toppings he chose for his focaccia......mea culpa!...it's all good, and you are right again that the toppings on the pissaladiere would work beautifully on the focaccia.....i have also seen recipes using puff pastry for the pissaladiere, but i prefer the regular crust.........now i might just have to make one today...i love all things anchovies, kalamata & roasted onions....thanks for the french term fougasse...haven't heard of that, but it certainly makes sense that it would be the french focaccia....

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #17 of 19

Why does'nt my pizza crust come out like the ones I get from the Pizza stores?

post #18 of 19

Could you list the differences between your results and what the stores get, and describe your recipe and method?

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by vic haranczak View Post

Why does'nt my pizza crust come out like the ones I get from the Pizza stores?



Well one reason might be that you don't have a 600-900 degree F oven. But a lot of it has to do with technique, practice, dough handling, etc. A long treatment which might give you some ideas about how to improve your home pizza, even if you don't want to disable the safety on your oven's self-cleaning feature is:

http://varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm

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