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SEA SCALLOPS PROVENCALE

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

SEA SCALLOPS PROVENCALE ... SERVES 2 AS A STARTER OR MEZE ...

 

8 large sea scallops ( fresh ) from your fish monger with corals in their shells ( & shells )

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

plain flour

3 tblsp extra virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves finely minced

2 tblsp Cognac ( French Appellation )

finely chopped fresh parsley

 

Wash the scallops well and scrub the shells thoroughly. Remove the corals and set aside. Slice each scallop in half horizontally and then pat dry with kitchen absorbent paper.

 

Season a little well and lightly dust over the white of the scallops on both sides.

 

Place the cleaned shells in a medium oven of 180 degrees centig or 350 degrees farenheit gas 4 heat ...

 

Heat the oil in a sauté pan over a high flame. When the oil is hot, add the garlic and as soon as it begins to sizzle, add the whites of the scallops. Cook for 1 minute, then add the corals and turn over the white scallops and cook 1 minute longer.

 

Stand back and pour in Cognac ( tie hair in ponytail or wear a baseball cap ) and allow to sizzle 1 minute to burn off the Cognac...

 

Then remove from the hear and stir in fresh parsley.

 

Spoon the scallps into the warmed shells ( from the oven ) and serve with a wonderful Champagne, Prosecco or Cava of choice.

 

 

This is a gorgeous starter or appetiser for New Years Eve ... or for the Three Wise Men on January 6th or Christmas Eve or Day.

 

Margcata.

 

 

post #2 of 13

 I.make and present same way, only I use 1/2 clarrified butter and 1/2  oil..and add about 1/2  t  of tomato and garlic concase  piped on top for taste and  eye appeal.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 13

Lovely! I would also have guessed there would be a little tomato in there, the adjective "provençal(e)" mostly suggests it's a dish with tomato.

post #4 of 13

Sounds really good, but just to understand since i'm mainly ignorant of most fish cooking - i would think cognac is too strong for delicate fish, but would use wine instead.  Cognac, with its rich, deep flavor seems more suited to meat.  But maybe not?  I admit ignorance. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 13

That little cognac won't leave too much of its own identity, especially evaporated and flamed off.  Rather it will round off any rough edges and add a mellow "bottom."  Similarly, the parsley won't add a lot of its own character but should tame the garlic so the sweet scallop taste can shine through. 

 

Nice recipe.

 

BDL

post #6 of 13

thanks BDL.  useful explanation as always

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

Sunday 10.30am Madrid Time

 

Firstly, according to a village French Chef who gave me this recipe, he did not employ tomatoes nor do I, however, if u wish to, go ahead. I like it just the way it is.

 

Cognac ... same answer ... If u prefer to flambée with white wine --- experiment ... I prefer the dish with cognac keeping it in the French Provence style ...

 

    

post #8 of 13

I think the "provencale" definition is probably like the "florentine" definition.  In French cooking, I believe, "Florentine" means with spinach, doesn't it?  But there is a cuisine in Florence and not everything has spinach in it!

Likewise "provencale" might mean with tomatoes and provencal herbs, but I'm sure they don't put tomato in everything (In fact, I know they don't).  So it could just mean how they would do it in Rrovence. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #9 of 13

The specification "Florentine" means indeed "with spinach". Does it refer to Florence? Could be, but I'm not sure. There are many dishes made with spinach carrying the specification "with spinach". One of the most wellknown being "Oeufs Florentine". Is a dish with spinach always typical a dish from the Italian Florence? Maybe not.

 

The specification "Provençal(e)" in a dish discription is a bit more open to interpretation imo. It suggests that the dish is "made in the style of the Provence", many times adding and/or combining tomato, lots of garlic, anchovis, pastis, thyme, onion, olive oil, aubergine, courgette, etc. A lot of dishes specified as Provençal have tomato in them, so that's what I expected when I read the title of this thread. Of course not all dishes from the Provence have tomato in them. Cognac is also not what I would discribe as typical from the Provence, pastis is their drink and it's often used in Provençal dishes. But, if a chef wants to use Cognac and call his recipe "sea scallops provencale", so be it.

post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

The Chef who gave me this recipe a few months ago in Provence --- ( I do not live in the USA ) and he does not use tomatoes in this recipe. It is a simple appetiser and quite lovely just the way the Chef gave it to me ... Try it ... it is a lovely appetiser with a lovely white wine from Galicia, preferably an Albariño from Cambados D.O.

 

Florentine is a dish with spinach, however, this does not mean all dishes in Florence have spinach, as a matter of fact, I lived in Italy for quite some time and Florentine as well as Provencal which is the adjective of a dish coming from Provence are " USA " terms for dishes. I have not seen this.     

post #11 of 13

Bistecca Fiorentina - Florentine steak - no spinach smile.gif

 

I think the terms have two connotations - one is "florentine" as in "that's how they make it in florence" and the other is  "florentine" as something with spinach.  Same probably for "provencale"  -

But just for the record, not all food in florence has spinach!  not even most food!  It's just something the french must have found unusual in some florentine dishes and called them "florentine" and the name stuck.  I did a little search on Italian websites and "trippa alla fiorentina" is tripe with tomato (no spinach) and "schiacciata alla fiorentina" is a flat sweet bread

 

Then we might dig up the whole story of Caterina de Medici.... but we won't, right?

 

 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #12 of 13

Yeah, what's in a name? It's like french fries, which are totally not french as you know, not as in the origine, nor in the process of making them.

There's however a positive side to this culinary mistake; it creates a discriminating distance between "our" high quality originals and the pseudo-french ones... lol

 

We could rename Margcata's posted recipe as "Coquilles St. Jacques flambées au Cognac" without any harm, it even sounds posh. I wouldn't want "sea scallops provencale" to conquer the US the same way "our" fries did! The people from Provence will not be amused, and remember,.. they are above all French! Ever heared of a "french colère"?

 

p.s. Don't worry Margcata, I'm joking, I do love your recipe!

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

 

ENJOY the dish ... it is so simple & easy to prepare ... I am a journalist & editor having little time to throw together a dish at the weekends ... this is just lovely ... Interesting comments however ...  

 

 

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