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Sauces; gravies; glazes, book recommendations?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Wanting to learn how to make different kinds of gravies and sauces that go with different meals and meats is there a website with that type info or a book anyone would recommend? Also wanting to buy a good book specific to spices and their applications and what goes with what?

Thanks in advance.

post #2 of 11

I haven't personally read it, but James Peterson's book "Sauces..." is usually recommended as the seminal work on sauces: 

 

http://www.amazon.com/Sauces-Classical-Contemporary-Sauce-Making/dp/0471292753

post #3 of 11

Peterson is great.  You might also want to check out David Larousse's book, The Sauce Bible.  Depending on the cuisine, most good cookbooks do lots of sauces. 

 

If you want to learn to make the more basic and common sauces, this is a very good place to ask.  There are some outstanding people with differing viewpoints.  You'll get a lot to choose from.

 

Is there anything in particular?

 

BDL

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post #4 of 11

Petersons book one of the best. Stay away from food network celebrity chef books. Most recipes the ratios are wrong.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replys. No BDL as you know my discipline is bbq but really wanting learn how to cook more fine/good food in the house for family and friends. Just was thinking how over the years some of the best foods/plates I had always came with some sort of sauce or gravy or something like that. May be getting back into the restaurant biz soon and just really want to make good food and make people happy.

thanks all.

 

post #6 of 11

Que,

 

Sources like Peterson and Larousse may be a bit more... well... Euro/technical than you want. 

 

Why not start with asking a bunch of questions here?  Of course, you're going to have narrow things down before your questions will make sense to others.  That narrowing is a good place to start.

 

Most sauces are put together in building block steps.  First you do some generic prep (like making a roux or sauteing aromatics), then you make a generic sauce, finally you make it a specific sauce with a few ingredients and technical additions. 

 

As a preliminary, there are limits to how well you can do with boxed stocks and bases; if you really want to push quality for sauces (including gravies) -- no matter how simple or basic -- you need to start with stock making. 

 

BDL

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post #7 of 11

Quetex, I strongly suggest to buy a good food magazine every now and then. In my country and in France, many magazines have an extra seasonal issue with recipes only. I would guess it's the same in your country. That is such a good source for trying out the modern way how different seasonal product work together. I just bought a fall issue with 100 exciting top recipes for 8€.

Sauces are so important. It's the final finishing touch of a dish. It ties everything on the plate together. I have to admit that it's imo probably the most difficult thing in cooking. The wrong sauce will simply kill a dish. The right sauce will do magic. And, most of all, a dish without a sauce is not nearly finished.

 

The days of standard heavy sauces from old cookbooks are so over. Today, cooking is about light but very tasty, including sauces and jus. That's what you'll find in magazines. On the other hand, it never hurts to have a quick browse in the dusty old cookbooks to learn something about classic techniques. You will discover that many modern sauces are contemporary, easier and lighter versions of the classics.

 

A very good book on spices with a good deal of recipes; Spice Market by Jane Lawson - Murdoch Books Pty Limited

post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

Never mind the limitations BDL of the boxed stuff, its the "extra" stuff in there I have a problem with like fillers, additives,preservatives, ect. At home I like to make everything from scratch as much as possible including my bbq rubs, which btw this past saturday I nabbed a  Texas State championship against 42 of the best in the state still using the rub off your blog. There are many good rubs on the shelves but since I eat  my practice food I wont use them but rather make my own so I know exactly what is in there and can adjust as I think it needs to tweak the flavor. Any how I like your idea and will start asking questions if i dont find the answers through the searches here. 

Chris 

 

 

Quote:
 It's the final finishing touch of a dish. It ties everything on the plate together. I have to admit that it's imo probably the most difficult thing in cooking. The wrong sauce will simply kill a dish. The right sauce will do magic. And, most of all, a dish without a sauce is not nearly finished.

Thats exactly how I feel even though i am not a cheft but I have had those experiences when eating out and cooking some of the things we cook regularly at home. Its true that everything changes.

 

Been talking to a potential partner about stating up a steak house down here, we have very few of them.

 

 

post #9 of 11

The Peterson Sauce book is an incredible reference. His soups and vegetables books are also essential reading. Don't forget Larousse and the original Silver Palette, they're both packed full of useful stuff.

 

Ken Harper

http://www.chopchop.ca

post #10 of 11

A good simple straight forward book on sauces is, "The Complete Book of Sauces", by Sallie Y. Williams.  She gives you good basic information.  Hints on substitutes for hard to find ingredients.  More than 300 recipes.  An index in the back that lists the dish and what sauces would be proper for it as well as a name index for the sauce.  Not expensive on Amazon.

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the suggestions, will be ordering today.

 

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