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Ribs in the Oven? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

I rarely have occasion to cook ribs and i can't light a fire to save my life (tried a chimney and it lit up in a whirlpool of hot fire, like the gates of hell, and then two minutes later when i dared get close enough to dump the charcoal, there was hardly any left!  My husband won't barbecue, not in his culture i guess) but if i were to cook them they would either be cooked on the barbecue or in the grill of my oven.

 

But, i wondered why one would cook ribs in a slow cooker?  How can that be anything at all like a barbecue? It's a stew of ribs.  Barbecue means a nice crust, roasty taste, and slow cooker means slowly simmered, low moist heat.  Maybe because for me meat that is simmered or steamed is not worth eating, and am not a fan of stews, but even if i were, i don't get how that can be even remotely compared to barbecue?  It's an entirely different thing. 

 

I'm with you, Koukou, i like to pull off the meat from the bone, membrane and all, like a wild carnivore or a paleolithic tribeswoman around the hearth fire.  Otherwise what's the point of eating ribs?  Get a nice, tender piece of meat, cut it with a knife and fork and a cloth napkin in your lap...  Yes, toothpicks and floss, and all that stuff is necessary, esp at my age!  I do accept that element of civilization. 


Many points here!  First of all, your husband doesn't bbq????  That's tragic!  What culture doesn't bbq?

 

I agree that ribs are great on the bbq.  I haven't tried them slow cooked indoors so I can't comment on how good they are.  Considering the fat content in spare ribs I'm guessing they'd be pretty good.  But we have GOT to get you over here one day for a good stew.  I know you like your meat on high heat and still moooing on the inside, but even though you don't like stewed meat (NOT boiled or steamed EWW!) you simply must start to understand the appeal it has for those of us who love it.  Don't get me wrong, I love a good roasted or grilled piece of meat.  It has a great texture and chewiness.  However, when you get a nice piece of beef chuck and put it in la creuset along with onions, garlic, tomatoes, etc. it marries into this beautiful meaty sauce and the meat is tender and silky.  I can't help but think you haven't had a good stew or slow roasted piece of meat.

 

 

 

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #32 of 43

I wanna reiterate.  Definitely remove the membrane.

post #33 of 43


My favorite way to cook them is to put them in the pressure cooker until tender, then simply satr and pepper them and put them in a high temp oven until they are sort of crisp on the outside.   And saurkraut - YES!   They would probably be even better with more spices, but S&P are enough, IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Kuan and Nicko's ideas are very good. 

 

But to go right to your question:  Yes, you can throw them in the oven.  There are a lot of oven recipes for great ribs which don't include or mimic outdoor methods.  One traditional favorite is spare ribs cooked with sauerkraut.  It's a very easy dish to make, and should you want to know more I'll happily supply a recipe.

 

BDL



 

post #34 of 43


 



 


Edited by IndyGal - 10/17/11 at 8:57pm
post #35 of 43

I just marinate them and put them straight on the bbq. Sometimes I use the kettle braai and close it for a while, but mostly it is just uncovered on straight fire.

Like KK and Siduri, I like to chew on the meat and bones. Ribs need to be a bit tough in my opinion. Don't know why but I just like it that way., wheras I like all other meat to be soft

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post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Many points here!  First of all, your husband doesn't bbq????  That's tragic!  What culture doesn't bbq?

 

I agree that ribs are great on the bbq.  I haven't tried them slow cooked indoors so I can't comment on how good they are.  Considering the fat content in spare ribs I'm guessing they'd be pretty good.  But we have GOT to get you over here one day for a good stew.  I know you like your meat on high heat and still moooing on the inside, but even though you don't like stewed meat (NOT boiled or steamed EWW!) you simply must start to understand the appeal it has for those of us who love it.  Don't get me wrong, I love a good roasted or grilled piece of meat.  It has a great texture and chewiness.  However, when you get a nice piece of beef chuck and put it in la creuset along with onions, garlic, tomatoes, etc. it marries into this beautiful meaty sauce and the meat is tender and silky.  I can't help but think you haven't had a good stew or slow roasted piece of meat.

 

 

 

 



Yes, tragic, and unfortunately I am not able to light a fire to save my soul. 

 

As to stews, I do make one exception - carbonnade - the belgian stew made with belgian beer, caramelized onions, deeply browned meat etc.  The brownness of it, the slightly sweet character, the onions - they all go towards the plus side.  (Also it's not that i really HATE stews, just that given a piece of meat, i prefer not to let liquids get in contact with it.  But if someone is cooking for me, i'll eat anything!)

 

I think most of my experience is of stews is with tomato, and much as i like tomato, i don't usually like things cooked in it. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #37 of 43

I think we're getting a little mixed up here regarding gnawing vs tender and what we're talking about in terms of the membrane. 

 

Ribs can and should supply both gnaw and tenderness.  "Fall off the bone," tenderness is not desirable, and neither is toughness.  The presence or lack of the membrane is incidental to those qualities; and in any case, burns off or at least breaks up during direct heat grilling.  Ribs cooked for barbecue competition are judged positively for the meat's ability to stick with the bone when a bite is taken; while "fall of the bone" is severely downgraded.   Nevertheless, the meat must be sufficiently tender so the judge doesn't have to wrestle with it, or chew and chew and chew.  Well cooked pork is always tender -- tough is never good.

 

To be clear, the very dense, white, collagenous material which holds the bones and meat together, is NOT the membrane but the collagenous cover of the rib socket.  The membrane is an almost clear, silverskin which covers the back of the slab and the inside of the flap -- only.  Worth noting that, depending on the butcher, pre-trimmed, packaged ribs often come with the membrane already removed.  So, if you buy "St Louis" or "KC" style spares, you may not even get the membrane to begin with.  On the other hand, if you buy "packer cut," whole ribs, you certainly will.

 

I've never heard anyone ask for "extra silverskin," or even say they liked it in any other context; but do understand how some gnawers might like to scrape their teeth against it as part of the gnawing process; I do.  But the dentally scraped membrane is not good eating.  And, speaking as a gnawer myself, the bit of extra gnawing is not worth leaving the back of the rib unseasoned. 

 

If you cook indirect, "low and slow," and haven't at least tried ribs with the membrane removed -- you don't know what you're missing.   

 

BDL

post #38 of 43

Amen! to just about everything you say, Boar.

 

Personally, I don't care for the membrane even when cooked over direct heat. Just a personal taste thing.

 

Leaving it in place when cooking indirect low & slow (which is how I do ribs 90% of the time) makes no sense to me at all. It gets in the way of seasoning, as you say. And is the next best think to inedible. So, I vote with Kuan: always remove the membrane.  

 

Here's a related question: How many start with packer-packed, but then trim off the flap and knuckle ends?

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #39 of 43

Membrane off, I always buy the packer but in the cryovac and do my own trimming if I want St Louis cut but generally if cooking for myself I don't both trimming, I enjoy getting in there and picking around all the cartilage and some of the best meat is buried in there.

post #40 of 43

My long post with pictures shows how I trim packer cut spares for family -- removing the chine bone and membrane, and closely trimming the flap.  I'm not sure if that particular style of trim has a name or not, but it's very common in SoCal.    If we're entertaining at the "dressy casual" level (never since I retired), I'll go St Louis style, which means removing the tips.  Not everyone removes the tangle of crossed from the small ends, but I always do if there's any possibility of guests.  Too messy.

 

That said, I don't think there's any particular virtue in using packers if you have a decent butcher who will trim for you.  It can be a little intimidating, especially if the sharpest knife in the house is a serrated steak knife -- which isn't as uncommon as it should be.  Also, real packers are packed two slabs to the cryovac bag, and not everyone wants to cook so many ribs at one time. 

 

BDL

post #41 of 43

That's all very informative!

I'll check my ribs (well not mine, but the pig's) next time to see if the membrane is removed or not. If it isn't I'll try removing it and cooking it that way to see if it makes a difference.

 

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post #42 of 43

 

YES, there is a name for that particular style of trim. 

Quote:
My long post with pictures shows how I trim packer cut spares for family -- removing the chine bone and membrane, and closely trimming the flap.  I'm not sure if that particular style of trim has a name or not, but it's very common in SoCal. 

 

It's the "Really NICE CUT Style". I looked it up. 

post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

We ended up grilling them outside after all.  You all would HATE my ribs.  They most certainly do not fall off the bone.  You have to chew like a dog to get all the meat off.  The membrane is attached.  There is no mop.  I seasoned them with olive oil, garlic salt, pepper, and oregano, then brushed them with lemon juice in the last 5 minutes of cooking.  Typical greek style with a robust smoky flavor.  Served with a corn salad.  Not the kind of meal you want to have without floss in the house :)

 

I am so curious about oven baked ribs though.  Might have to make that soon anyway.



Nothing wrong with leaving the membrane on imo, especially if your bbqing. Keeps more of the moisture in the meat if your cooking membrane down. I cook them that way at home most of the time and only remove it for competition to maximize flavor throughout the rib meat, ie rub and sauce. Most bbqer's cook them around five hours +-, mine are usually done in 3 hours and just great. If you like a firmer rib thats ok too, different strokes for different folk they say. However to get them a little softer just cook them longer, cooking time will vary depending on the actual cooker and temperature of the heat inside the grill plus how many time you peek. They always taste better imo too unwrapped but you have to e very careful with them temps so as not to overcook and dry them out or burn them. 

 

 

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