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Favorite Fall Dish - Page 3

post #61 of 77

Gee, KYHeirloomer, you are a treasure trove of information.  Thanks for sharing.  Now I don't feel so bad about my shortcuts.

 

post #62 of 77

 

Originally Posted by boar_d_laze
Iceberg is sadly overused by people who don't get it, and sadly underused by people who do. Why?

 

I think iceberg lettuce tastes funny, sort of chemically for want of a better word..   I have not used it for years now.  But I'm open to it, if you have a good reason.

DD

post #63 of 77

never one to step on anyone's thread  here but dinner is over, the dishes are done and everyone's watching the game...i am so not a football fan...so here i am.... indygal, have you ever had fresh iceberg lettuce?  as in the real deal, like from someone's garden?....tender and sweet, like your first love, crisp, crunchy and cold.... it's a whole different being than those cellophane wrapped globes in the supermarket. another 'retro' classic salad...i'm thinking from the 'Brown Derby' in beverly hills....bdl most likely knows...anyway, a wedge from the core of a head(quarter), with blue cheese dressing(homemade maytag is best,but good fresh storebought works too... litehouse makes a good one), oh, it should be a chunky dressing so you can doctor a storebought one as well...it is perfect in its simplicity...indygal, you being a retro gal, i think you would like it...try it....if you can' find farmers market fresh try your health food store or buy the globes, lightly tap the bottom and pull out the core, peel back the outer leaves til you get to the sweet little leaves that are tight together... quarter them..make sure the lettuce is cold .

and listen to this...enjoy!!

joey

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrMJzCMrYNY&feature=colike  

indy gal...know this should be in the 'what we're listening to thread', but since your here check out her other music...duet with tony bennet is great...petals probably knows her as she's a canadian too...


Edited by durangojo - 10/31/11 at 11:51am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #64 of 77

I love those iceberg wedge salads, haven't made one in a couple of years.  That's how iceberg is meant to be eaten.  We eat very often at my inlaws and they have the unfortunate habit of serving iceberg salad every time.  It's chopped to bits and doused in canola oil.  I'm one to eat anything, but only if it's worth the calories.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #65 of 77

 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

I love those iceberg wedge salads, haven't made one in a couple of years.  That's how iceberg is meant to be eaten.  We eat very often at my inlaws and they have the unfortunate habit of serving iceberg salad every time.  It's chopped to bits and doused in canola oil.  I'm one to eat anything, but only if it's worth the calories.



Gawd, I made so many of those iceberg wedges in my first restaurant job (Morrisons) back in the day.

The rib in romaine gives you the same cool sweetish crunch, and a bit more flavor.....

Back on topic,with the cooler weather, I think its about time for some Coq au vin.

Maybe I'll use rabbit instead of an old hen this time.

 

 

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post.

 

I find it interesting that you love stews and aren't big on soups. To my mind, the only difference between them is the thickness. Add liquid to any stew and voila!---you've turned it into soup.

 

 


My late mum (a great cook) once chided me for a "soup" I made because the pieces of vegetables were "too large".  She said that big pieces of veggies go into stewsIn a soup, she said, and I agree now, the pieces must be small - diced or preferably minced.  This is one reason, she explained, why soup is given to sick  or convalescing patients; old or toothless folks; or people in a hurry (the quick lunch).  Nothing that needs chewing, just shovel it down the hatch.  The thoroughly cooked vegetables' and/or beans' nutrients have gone into the liquid base.

 

Thickness or thinness of the liquid was not a big factor for her, and I agree with that, also.  It is what you do with the ingredients in that thick or thin liquid base that count.

 

What do you think.

 

I wish Mama was still here to advise me!talker.gif

 

post #67 of 77

OK, Jo, if you say so. (Your musical tastes holds great influence with me).  I grow only buttercrunch or leaf lettuce. I don't even like romaine much, but I do enjoy a good ceasar salad.     It is my understanding that iceberg lettuce requires more care than those do, so I always skipped it.   I go to HFS often, so I'll try it.  I love blue cheese dressing, I make it often for regular salads.    But if I cannot find fresh, I will continue to skip the celophane wrapped globes in the stores.  YUK.

DD

post #68 of 77


Hi KY,

 

I think of stew as very well defined, with meat being more prominent in them than in soups in general.  In my minds soups can be made of anything, but stews MUST have meat as it's main feature.    And then there are chowders........

Quote:

 

I find it interesting that you love stews and aren't big on soups. To my mind, the only difference between them is the thickness. Add liquid to any stew and voila!---you've turned it into soup.

 

Don't most cookbooks and menues list chili as a soup? That's my impression, anyway.



 

post #69 of 77

 

Quote:

I think of stew as very well defined, with meat being more prominent in them than in soups in general. In my minds soups can be made of anything, but stews MUST have meat as it's main feature. And then there are chowders........

 

Sorry Indygal, but I have to side more with KYH on this one as to what the difference is between a soup and a stew.  There are many cultures out there with fabulous vegetarian stews in which meat plays no part.  I really see stew as more of a  really thick soup, which really does nothing for my argument that I prefer stews over soups!!! redface.gif

post #70 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyGal View Post


Hi KY,

 

I think of stew as very well defined, with meat being more prominent in them than in soups in general.  In my minds soups can be made of anything, but stews MUST have meat as it's main feature.    And then there are chowders........



 


I agree with Pete.  I make vegetable stews all the time and there is no meat in them.  There are endless possibilities for vegetable stews and one of my favorites is green bean, tomato and potato stew. 

 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wyandotte View Post


My late mum (a great cook) once chided me for a "soup" I made because the pieces of vegetables were "too large".  She said that big pieces of veggies go into stewsIn a soup, she said, and I agree now, the pieces must be small - diced or preferably minced.  This is one reason, she explained, why soup is given to sick  or convalescing patients; old or toothless folks; or people in a hurry (the quick lunch).  Nothing that needs chewing, just shovel it down the hatch.  The thoroughly cooked vegetables' and/or beans' nutrients have gone into the liquid base.

 

Thickness or thinness of the liquid was not a big factor for her, and I agree with that, also.  It is what you do with the ingredients in that thick or thin liquid base that count.

 

What do you think.

 

I wish Mama was still here to advise me!talker.gif

 



Personally I don't agree.  I think soups play a bigger role in cuisine today.  Soups can be cold or hot, starters or main courses, pureed or chunky, brothy or chowdery.  And don't forget that adding pasta or rice makes it very filling as well.  Back when I was a kid soup was thought to be for sick and old people but now soup is enjoyed by all whether ill or elderly. 

 

The "thoroughly cooked vegetables/beans nutrients" having gone into the liquid base is a whole different issue.  For sure the flavor has gone into the broth.  But through modern science we have learned that cooking vegetables for a long time depletes them of their nutrients, the nutrients don't go into the broth, they get destroyed by the prolonged high temperature.  Most vegetables should be eaten raw for the highest possible nutrient extraction.

 

I also hate thoroughly cooked vegetables in soups so while I will make a broth with bones and veggies I throw all that stuff out when I make the broth.  Then when I use the broth to make soup I add freshly cut veggies to the soup.  All for the sake of flavor, texture, and nutrition.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #72 of 77

In Portugal, Spain and Italy stews had originated in the rural countryside, and most did not have meat, as a matter of fact, during the medieval times, the harshest of all times with invasions, plagues and tortures of innocent folk, these peasant dishes of bowls of substenance were herbs, scarce vegetables and grains which came from Marco Polo to Europe, legumes, and whatever else that was edible and grew, and possibly some hunted game in the remote mountains or forests where countryfolk laboreres were more clandestine, or the fishermen's fish or shellfish along the coast access. They are called Cassolas in Italian, Cozidos in Portugal and Cocidos in Spain. Many of these stews today are still served through out the country however, with modern techinques and refined ingredients such as Pasta e Fagioli or Fisherman's Stew and with the Americas having been discovered, the potato, tomato, peppers and chili peppers etceta. Meat has come along much later, during the Royal Courts and mostly in roasted or fire braised forms. The Royal members of the Court were quite gluttonous. Stews are a very basic in Europe during its terribly cold and grey late autumns and early winters. Each country has its recipes. In Wales, cawl is a relatively meat free stew of cabbage, parsnips, potatoes, leeks and turnips however, with some bacon fat and bread cubes. In Brazil, Feijoada is a black bean stew served with citrus fruits on the side, and the meats predominately pork varieties on the side. The beans are placed upon rice, and this recipe hails from Portugal however, due to the Portuguese colonizing of Brazil, and the African slave trade, many indigenious forms of the tuber family have become today's staples, sweet potato called boniato, yuca root or casava or manioc and this product is also converted into a flour, as the chickpeas or garbanzos utilised throughout the Middle East, Northern Africa and Andalusia. These are all stews including the Tahine of Tangier. In Indian cuisine stews are bountiful in vegetables, such as the spinach, potato and cheese variety called Paneer. Stews can be meatless or with meat, fish varieties such as the famous Bullaibaise or Brodetto di Ancona in Italian.

 

I believe chowders usually contain clams or corn, potatoes and sometimes hamhock and or bacon a part of their stock. A good corn chowder or clam chowder ... sounds super good ... There are no restaurants in Madrid or Spain for that matter, with a wonderful New England Clam Chowder, creamed style or tomato style ... nor southwestern corn chowder ... Comforting as a whole ...

 

Of course, this is off top of my head ... verses researching the exact history with dates ...

Margcata   

post #73 of 77

 

Soups are the heart and soul of a country. It is part of the texture of everyday life, afflent or laboral class. Zuppa or soup, still command most of the northern regions of Europe and Asia, from Misu to Chicken noodle or chicken rice soup ... Children and adults alike are given chicken soup as the panacea or remedy to all ills as the healer's liquid to reducing fevers and aches and pains ...

 

Unmistakeningly, they are rooted in traditional fare worldwide ... and and their ingredients are seldom elaborate ... simplicity and ease ... and there is not a culture I could comeup with that does not have at least one ...

 

Soups are a tradition, and there is a holding on to something in the middle of change ... we have carried these soup recipes with us since childhood and that is why they are a staple wherever we are during the cold season. On the XXI century side of things, we have cold creams and Gazpachos during the summer, a take off on hot soups, they are cold seasonal soups with Gazpacho as a nick name ... they are drinkable in a mug too or martini glass whatever one prefers or with bowl and spoon ...

 

 

post #74 of 77

According to Barbara Ann Kipfer new---and rather well done IMO---The Culinarian A Kitchen Desk Reference (John Wiley & Sons, 2011):

 

Soup is a liquid foodstuff made of a vegetable or meat, poultry, or fish stock and often containing other ingredienbts, such as pieces of solid food, herbs, and spices. The word dates to around 1653 in English, and up until then this food had been called broth or pottage

 

Stew is any dish that has been slowly simmered in liquid; stewing tenderizes meat, fish, and/or vegetables and blends the ingredients. Stew is from the Old French estuver, "to steam," and originally meant a stove, heatede room, hot bath, or cauldron.

 

Seems to me that differentiating these two can be as difficult as defining "salad." But the desk reference seems to agree with me, that the major difference is the amount of liquid.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #75 of 77

Hi Pete, KY and Kouko

 

I no sooner wrote that than I dug out my recipe for Morrocan cous cous with vegetable stew.

(acorn squash, carrots, garbonzo beans, carrots, raisins, tomato and highly spiced with ginger, coriander, cinnamon, cardamon, etc.   Not a trace of meat, except if you wish, you can put a few shellfish on top.    

 

LOL.  I stand corrected.

 

DD

post #76 of 77

  I stand corrected.

 

Better to sit....preferably at a table, in front of a bowl of sumpin good to eat. drinkbeer.gif

 

 And then there are chowders........

 

Are you suggesting that chowders are not soups?

 

A chowder is a soup that usually (but not always) is made with seafood, often (but not always) made with dairy as the liquid, but which always includes potatoes.

 

Let's keep in mind that a subset of a category doesn't remove it from the category. It just means there are enough versions of it similar enough to be grouped together under the main title.

 

 

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #77 of 77

I make a Cream of Yeloow Squash and Morel Mushroom Soup that is warm and comforting.

Cream of Yellow Squash and Morel Mushroom Soup

Ingredients:


1.5 ounces morel mushrooms, dried
1/2 stick butter
4 yellow squash, crookneck, coarsely chopped
1/2 yellow onion, coarse chopped
2 teaspoons garlic, chopped
6 chicken bouillon cubes
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons red bell pepper, small dice for garnish

Preparation:

Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and add the dried mushrooms. Cover and remove from heat. Allow mushrooms to soak for 30 minutes. Drain the softened mushroom and reserve the liquid. Cut the mushrooms into ¼ inch slices and rinse them under cool running water to remove any dirt particles.

Combine butter, squash, onion, garlic, bouillon cubes, spices and 2 cups of water in a sauce pan and bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.

Pour cooked squash mixture into a blender and puree (carefully if hot). The mixture will be thick. Add heavy cream and ½ cup of the reserved mushroom liquid to the mixture and blend in.

Add the sliced morels and the red bell peppers. Enjoy.

IMG_6718.JPG

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